Cardiac Catheterizations Overused

This post was authored by Brian Nash and posted to The Eye Opener on March 11th, 2010.

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According to an article published by WebMd, a recent study suggests that almost two-thirds of patients who undergo cardiac catheterizations do not have clogged arteries.

Researchers tracked about two million patients who had the procedure at about 663 hospitals across the nation between 2004 and 2008. Of the two million patients, researchers focused on about 400, 000 patients with stable chest pain and no previous history of heart disease. The study specifically excluded patients with a history of heart disease, angina, or heart attacks.  In this population of patients, about two-thirds did not have significant arterial blockage.

Cardiac catheterization is a commonly used invasive procedure to diagnose blockage in the arteries of the heart. The procedure is performed by inserting a catheter in an artery of the arm or the leg. The catheter is then guided into the coronary arteries of the heart.  At such time, a die is injected through the catheter and its flow is analyzed to determine whether the artery is blocked.

According to Pamela S. Douglas, professor of cardiology at Duke University:

We want to be clear that if someone is having a heart attack and their doctor sends them to a cath lab, they shouldn’t argue. … But a stable patient who has not been diagnosed with heart disease and who does not need catheterization for pain control may want to ask about the risks and benefits.

Contributing author: Jon Stefanuca

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