New First-Of-Its-Kind Study: 70,000 Children Injured Annually by Medical Devices

This post was authored by Rodd Santomauro and posted to The Eye Opener on July 29th, 2010.

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A new first-time study of injuries suffered by children as a result of medical devices has produced some startling statistics. “More than 70,000 children and teens go to the emergency room each year for injuries and complications from medical devices,” according to an article in The Washington Post, which highlights a study just published by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Although the study points out that only 6% of all of these injuries required hospitalization, the fact remains that there is still a very large number of children that suffer injuries due to medical devices.  Some injuries are due to malfunction and misuse, while others are from very dangerous events, such as “puncture wounds from hypodermic needles breaking off in the skin while injecting medicine or illegal drugs”. According to the The Washington Post article:

The most serious problems involved implanted devices such as brain shunts for kids with hydrocephalus (water on the brain); chest catheters for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy at home; and insulin pumps for diabetics. Infections and overdoses are among problems associated with these devices.

In addition, the article touches on a recent trend that has come with medical advances: home health care, for such treatments and procedures which previously required longer and more extensive hospital stays:

Dr. Steven Krug, head of emergency medicine at Chicago’s Children’s Memorial Hospital, said the study highlights a trade-off linked with medical advances that have enabled chronically ill children to be treated at home and live more normal lives.

Home care can be challenging for families; Krug says he has seen children brought in because catheters were damaged or became infected.

“Health care providers need to be aware of these kids and their devices and how to recognize or diagnose” related problems, Krug said.

All of this being said, the article suggests that the Food and Drug Administration may soon become more involved, due to the nature and extent of these injuries to children:

The researchers are working to determine how and why the injuries occurred and also are examining the prevalence in adults. Those efforts might result in FDA device warnings, depending on what they find, said study co-author, Dr. Brock Hefflin.

Hefflin and lead author Dr. Cunlin Wang work in the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. They note there has been recent concern about medical device safety in children, particularly since many devices intended for adults are used in children.

We leave you with this conclusion, as stated by the American Academy of Pediatrics:

This study provides national estimates of pediatric medical device-associated adverse events resulting in emergency department visits and highlights the need to develop interventions to prevent pediatric device-related injuries.

Is this an adequate response?  What do you think?

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