CT Scans – Are You Being Properly Protected Against Radiation?

This post was authored by Jon Stefanuca and posted to The Eye Opener on December 2nd, 2010.

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According to new research presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America, breast shields should be used for men and women undergoing CT scans of the chest/lungs. According to Terry Healey, M.D., Director of thoracic radiation at Alpert Medical School of Brown University, the breast shield is capable of reducing the level of radiation by about 30%.  This is significant considering that radiation can cause or contribute to the development of various malignancies (e.g. breast cancer, lung cancer, esophageal cancer).

Although some physicians argue that the use of breast shields may impact the quality of the CT scan (i.e., by producing artifacts such as streaks or lines making the interpretation of the study more difficult), this new research suggests that the use of breast shields does not impact the diagnostic quality of the CT scan. A breast shield is nothing more than a thin piece of heavy metal placed in front of the chest during the CT scan procedure.

Researchers studied 50 patients, who needed CT scans of the chest. Most of the patients were undergoing the study to rule-out lung cancer.  For some patient the shield was placed directly on the chest. For other patients, the shield was slightly elevated from the chest surface. Overall, some artifact was present in about 2/3 of the cases. However, in the opinion of the researchers, there were no instances where the artifact interfered with the diagnostic quality of the radiographic study.

According to Judy Yee, M.D., vice chair of radiology at the University of California: ”[T]here’s no good reason not to use breast shields. The cost is relatively low and the benefit large.”

Perhaps a larger patient population is needed for the results of this research to be more widely accepted by the radiology community. We’d appreciate anyone who has experience in this field to share their thoughts on this topic. Do such shields cause artifact that makes the study less accurate and potentially dangerous to a patient? Does the accuracy of the scan, when a shield is used, depend on which type of scanner is used or which generation of scanner is being used? Are there other techniques that can be used to protect a patient yet not run the risk of artifact “mis-read”? We’re not physicians or radiology technicians, so we welcome any insights those who are might have on this topic.

If you are concerned about excessive radiation and need to undergo a chest CT, ask your radiologist if a protective shield can be used during your CT scan. Discuss the issue and – as we always stress – take charge of your own medical care. Be an informed patient and be responsible for your own health and safety. Know what the issues, risks and benefits are and discuss it with your doctor. Then – and only then – make an informed decision.

Image from emedicine.medscape.com

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