5 Questions to Ask Your Obstetrician Before You Go to the Hospital

This post was authored by Brian Nash and posted to The Eye Opener on March 9th, 2011.

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Having our baby

Once the special moment comes for you to go to the hospital to deliver your baby, there’s so much that goes on that it just may not be the best time to remember questions you wanted to ask your obstetrician. I’ve been there four times – so, as they say, been there done that! I’ve also had a number of cases that made me stop and think – “I wonder if some of the issues that my clients encountered could have been avoided if they had asked some questions before they wound-up in labor in hospital?” As you can well imagine, that is perhaps not the best time for a Q and A session.

This past weekend, I posted somewhat of a survey on our Facebook Page and Twitter asking our friends, fans and followers what questions they wished they had asked their obstetricians before they arrived at the hospital. I also have a number of moms, who work in our law office; so I put the question to them as well. The responses received provided some interesting food for thought, which I thought I might share with those about to have their baby.

Who will be delivering my baby?

This was one of the most frequent questions making the list. A number of women complained that they wish they had known that their primary obstetrician was not going to be the delivering doctor. Turns out that physician was being covered the day/night these moms delivered. While they may have met all the members of the practice (if it was a group practice), they were not particularly happy when their primary obstetrician wasn’t there for the delivery. The problem is compounded when their primary obstetrician was off and being covered by someone they had never met before. Suggestion: find out as best you can what the chances are that there will be coverage by someone you’ve never met before you arrive at the hospital. You may want to make an appointment to meet that potential covering physician if this is a concern.

When will I see my obstetrician at the hospital?

One of the cases we are handling somewhat arose from a situation that raises this as an issue. You get to the hospital, you’re admitted, you’re placed in bed, monitor attached – you’re good to go. But – where’s your doctor? Does he/she even know you’re there? When is your obstetrician coming to see you? Several of the women who responded said this was a real concern and wished they had discussed this with their doctor before they sat in bed waiting and waiting for their doctor to arrive. They also wondered – if there was no direct phone call before going to the hospital, just how could they be sure their doctor was notified that they had arrived. In one instance, one obstetrician claimed she didn’t know the patient was even in hospital for more than 4 hours! This woman had to undergo an emergency C-Section when the doctor allegedly figured out she was there. Suggestion: confirm with the hospital staff after you arrive that your doctor has been notified that you have arrived and ask when you might expect for your doctor to arrive and examine you.

Who will be doing the circumcision of my baby boy?

A number of parents indicated that while they had discussed whether their newborn son would have a circumcision, it hadn’t crossed their minds to ask – “Who will be doing the procedure?” If this is an important consideration, and you would like an answer not only as to “who” but “what experience” they have, think about covering this with your obstetrician beforehand. While some physicians are very good at performing this procedure, others are not so good. There have been a number of infant penile injuries that we have happened in the hands of – well let’s say – less than skilled physicians.

What will happen if for some reason I require general anesthesia but I’ve recently had a meal?

One of the common orders for a patient who will undergo general anesthesia is that they be NPO (nothing by mouth – liberal translation) for hours prior to surgery. While you may have planned to have an epidural or natural childbirth, some conditions involving you and/or your baby (non-reassuring fetal heart tracing, placental abruption, etc) can occur that may change the “plan” and require that you undergo a different form of anesthetic management. Suggestion: if such a situation should arise, you will be seen by an anesthesiologist first. Perhaps you will have a discussion about possible alternatives for anesthetic management, but I can virtually assure you, that will not be the best time to have a coherent, meaningful discussion. Some have suggested, based on their experience, that asking for and having a meeting with anesthesia personnel before going to the hospital for delivery is time well spent. You can usually have such appointments made through your obstetrician’s office and have a meaningful discussion of the various alternatives, risks and complications at that time.

How long will the effects of my epidural anesthetic last after delivery?

It’s been pointed out to me that while some hospitals have discontinued the practice of providing pain relief (analgesia) post-partum by use of PCA (patient controlled analgesia) pumps, some hospitals still continue that practice. Regardless of what the hospital’s practice may be, there is usually a very consistent practice/protocol for when a woman who has had an epidural should be discharged from a recovery room/area. This is when she is able to bend her knees, move her hips and flex her feet in both directions. Suggestion: ask your obstetrician what his/her practice is for providing you pain management/relief after you deliver your baby. Will you have an epidural running to provide that relief? When should you expect to get return of your ability to use and feel your legs? Don’t guess – you could suffer what is known as a prolonged block, where the anesthetic, for various reasons, is taking too long to wear-off and affecting your neurological functioning. If your obstetrician doesn’t know, then consider talking to specialist in such pain relief techniques – the anesthesiologist at the hospital where you will be delivering your baby. While you’re there, you may also want to discuss what the risks, benefits and complications of epidural, spinal and general anesthesia are so that you are aware of these issues in advance.

What suggestions do you have?

This is only a partial list of a number of suggestions made by our readers and staff. What suggestions do you have? If you have already been through childbirth, are these matters or issues you wish you had discussed before you went to the hospital? If you are about to have your first child, are these issues, concerns or questions you might share? We – and our readers – would really like to hear from you. There is no substitute for experience – or so they say.

Image by corbisimages.com


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3 Responses to “5 Questions to Ask Your Obstetrician Before You Go to the Hospital”

  1. Kaye MillerNo Gravatar says:

    Additionally, parents should have interviewed and selected a pediatrician of choice by the last trimester. Remember, the OB is a mom doctor, not a baby doctor. Unless fetus-specific testing is performed (amniocentesis for instance) exams are geared to monitor the health of the mother. While the ideal scenario is to keep the baby cooking as long as possible, the resolution to many pregnancy related problems is delivery of the baby. There can be wild interplay between balancing the health of the mother and the gestational age of the fetus. This is where the skilled OB is appreciated. Perinatologists and neonatolgists are highly trained sub-specialties for high risk pregnancies and premature neonates. Biophysicial profiles, stress tests, and non-stress tests will give an indication of the baby’s tolerance to life inside and outside the uterus.

  2. TracyNo Gravatar says:

    I took a birthing class at the hospital where I was planning to deliver. In addition to the valuable information the class provided about birthing options and scenarios, we were able to take a tour of the delivery and maternity wards. This was helpful in planning what to bring to the hospital and what to be prepared for while in labor. Many classes are offered, including a one weekend crash course.

  3. meaningful use…

    [...]5 Questions to Ask Your Obstetrician Before You Go to the Hospital | Eye Opener: The Nash & Associates Blog | %post_tags%[...]…

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