July 1 – New Residents, New Rules……Again!

This post was authored by Theresa Neumann and posted to The Eye Opener on June 13th, 2011.

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Last year, I wrote a blog on “The July Effect”, a long-observed phenomenon of increased hospital deaths during the month of July that was substantiated by medical data and statistics just last year. These data seemed to specifically relate these deaths to the influx of new medical school graduates into teaching hospitals as first-year residents of those institutions. The conclusions of the study seemed well-substantiated. I further elaborated on some of the potential causes of errors being made that could result in harm to patients; what I didn’t elaborate upon was the rigorous and demanding schedule that residents assume.

In 2003, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) instituted new policies regarding the time limitations of ALL residents, but specifically focused on the first year resident. These limitations were placed on the number of hours that residents could and should work in any given week or rotation in an effort to safeguard the health of the resident but more so to ensure the safety and well-being of patients being treated by these residents.

It is now 2011, and the ACGME is instituting even stricter limitations affecting both first year and mid-level residents; Nixon Peabody does a great job of delineating the changes in the guidelines. Much information has been published in the last year regarding the continued occurrence of medical errors despite protocols and safety mechanisms in place to protect patients (click on related blogs below). It seems that the ACGME is attempting to address some of these errors by addressing the fatigue factor of medical and surgical residents in training. The overall maximum hours per week will not change; it remains at 80 hours.  Yes, twice that of “normal” jobs. One big change is the limit on the maximum continuous duty period for first year residents; this will be decreased from 24 to 16 hours.  It will remain 24 hours for residents after their first year, but recommendations include “strategic napping.” Another change is the additional duty time, previously allotted as 6 extra hours to perform clinic duty, transfer of care, didactic training, etc.; for first year residents, these duties are to be included in the overall 80-hour work week, but after the first year, the residents will be allowed 4 additional hours. A third big change is the minimum time off between duty periods. Previously, it was noted that all residents “should have” 10 hours between shifts; year 1′s are still recommended to have 10  hours off, but they MUST HAVE AT LEAST 8! Intermediate-level residents should also have 10 hours off, but they also must have at least 8 hours off with a mandatory 14 hours off if they just completed a 24-hour shift. Final year residents are recommended to receive 8 hours off, but this is still being reviewed.  One thing that has not changed is the mandatory 1 day off in 7, averaged over 4 weeks.

Many of us watch the medical TV shows, but none of these shows really paint the true picture of medical residency training. As a Physician Assistant student, I trained alongside medical residents and medical students, alike. My training mirrored theirs in the hospital setting, and it happened well before the 2003 ACGME recommendations. There were times during my surgery rotation in a trauma center during which I worked 36 hours straight, followed by 10 hours off, then back to 10- and 12-hour days. The working hours entailed clinic time, managing daily in-patient care, many hours in the operating room, admitting patients during the overnight hours from the emergency room and emergency surgery for trauma victims, hours and hours at a time, in the overnight hours and during the day.  By the end of 36 hours, the exhaustion was indescribable. It is easy to understand how and why mistakes happen. After these crazy shifts, no one ever looked so glamorous as those who are depicted on television shows…..TRUST ME!

July 1, 2011, marks the date when over 100,000 medical residents across the USA from ACGME-accredited training programs start their training in teaching hospitals/institutions across this great nation. We should applaud the ACGME for looking at the data, analyzing studies regarding sleep deprivation, and putting forth these guidelines, not only to aid in patient safety but also to protect the health and well-being of these doctors in training. The pressures of residency are incredible. It is interesting that there was and still is opposition to the duty-hour limitations, citing oppositional rationale such as the residents do not learn enough in 16 hours, and small institutions do not have the support staff to treat all of the patients without the addition of medical resident hours.

So, who is going to fill those gaps created by the resident-hour restrictions placed by the ACGME come July 1st? Each institution will have to look at its own hospital model and decide according to current standards. In 2003, many of these gaps were filled by Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners; I suspect this will again be the case.  These mid-level practitioners are quite capable of providing many of the services necessary in hospital settings; they are a growing and well-respected addition to the healthcare team, and I suspect that their usefulness and potential will be more fully appreciated with the institution of healthcare reform!

For more information and Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) regarding the ACGME guidelines, please go to the website and click on the links!

And, no matter who is caring for you or your loved one, never be afraid to ask questions about therapies and medications being ordered. Be informed!

Related Posts:

“The July Effect”: Where To Seek Medical Care When The Heat Is On

Medical Malpractice – Serious Medical Errors: Failure of the System or Just Plain Ignorance

Study Finds Regional Hospitals Often Are Better At Preventing Medical Errors Than Academic Centers – Kaiser Health News

Tort Reform or Just Plain Medical Care Reform: the debate continues as thousands are injured annually in US hospitals

 

 

 

 

 

 

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3 Responses to “July 1 – New Residents, New Rules……Again!”

  1. Lisa DiMonteNo Gravatar says:

    Margaret Heffernan, author of “Willful Blindness” writes about the effects of fatigue on our ability to use our critical thinking skills: “As we get tired, glucose goes toward the part of the brain that keeps us awake, while going away from the area that controls critical thinking and processing; therefore, we become too tired to analyze things.

    “Consider this: The loss of one night’s sleep is equivalent to being in a drunken state. How does that affect our ability to analyze, advise and recognize that which is presented to us?

    “Working long hours does not make us more productive. In fact, people work at peak capacity at 40 hours a week. After that our capacity to think degrades significantly. When that happens we need additional hours to make up for the mistakes we made when we were tired.”

    Kind of scary if we apply this to the medical profession.

  2. TheresaNo Gravatar says:

    Lisa,

    Thank you for your input. Clearly this has been and continues to be an issue. Sleep deprivation is a serious deterrent to productivity, accuracy and, yes, critical thinking. Medicine and surgery are all about critical thinking, some specialties more than others. It’s about time the ACGME starts to really look at the age-old practices of the profession and practice what they preach….evidence-based medicine!

    Theresa

  3. Lisa DiMonteNo Gravatar says:

    It looks like this is a step in the right direction, Theresa. Thank you for sharing this valuable information.

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