Dealing with Cerebral Palsy: A Resource for Parents and Family (Part III)

This post was authored by Jason Penn and posted to The Eye Opener on June 22nd, 2011.

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In Part I of this series I provided a basic introduction to dealing with cerebral palsy.  I also provided Maryland parents with a comprehensive list of places that are able to assist parents.  In Part II I discussed educating children with cerebral palsy and provided a list of places to turn if you need help.  Today we will take a look at some of the medical treatments available for cerebral palsy.

Medical Treatment

Cerebral Palsy cannot be cured, but treatment can often improve a child’s capabilities. Progress due to medical research means that many patients can enjoy near-normal lives if their neurological problems are properly managed. There is no standard therapy that works for all patients; the physician must work with a team of other health care professionals to identify a child’s unique needs and impairments.  Typically, an individual treatment plan is created to addresses them.  As a general rule, the earlier diagnosis and treatment begins, the better chance a child has of overcoming developmental disabilities or learning new ways to accomplish difficult tasks.  The goal of treatment is to help the person be as independent as possible.

Treatment requires a team approach, including:

  • Primary care doctor
  • Dentist (dental check-ups are recommended around every 6 months)
  • Social worker
  • Nurses
  • Occupational, physical, and speech therapists
  • Other specialists, including a neurologist, rehabilitation physician, pulmonologist, and gastroenterologist

Treatment is based on the person’s symptoms and the need to prevent complications.  Self and home care include:

  • Getting enough food and nutrition
  • Keeping the home safe
  • Performing exercises recommended by the health care providers
  • Practicing proper bowel care (stool softeners, fluids, fiber, laxatives, regular bowel habits)
  • Protecting the joints from injury

Putting the child in regular schools is recommended, unless physical disabilities or mental development makes this impossible. Special education or schooling may help.

The following may help with communication and learning:

  • Glasses
  • Hearing aids
  • Muscle and bone braces
  • Walking aids
  • Wheelchairs

Physical therapy, occupational therapy, orthopedic help, or other treatments may also be needed to help with daily activities and care.

Medications may include:

  • Anticonvulsants to prevent or reduce the frequency of seizures
  • Botulinum toxin to help with spasticity and drooling
  • Muscle relaxants (baclofen) to reduce tremors and spasticity

Surgery may be needed in some cases to:

  • Control gastroesophageal reflux
  • Cut certain nerves from the spinal cord to help with pain and spasticity
  • Place feeding tubes
  • Release joint contractures

What is important, however, is that an individualized approach be taken for your child.

Query:  Does your child have cerebral palsy?  What medical treatments are you providing for your child?

 

 

Credits to http://www.nlm.nih.gov; www.nsnn.com

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