West Nile Virus is Back in D.C. -Things You Should Do to Stop the Spread

This post was authored by Jon Stefanuca and posted to The Eye Opener on October 12th, 2011.

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Last week, the D.C. Department of Health confirmed this year’s first case of West Nile Virus (WNV). WNV is a bird disease. However, infected mosquitoes can transmit the virus to humans. Otherwise, this disease cannot be transmitted directly from a human or a bird.  Persons infected with the West Nile Virus may experience severe headaches, fever, nausea, vomiting, muscle aches, pain, and stiffness.

While the risk of a WNV infection is low, individuals who are immunocompromised should be particularly careful and seek medical attention if symptoms are present. Individuals with weak or suppressed immune systems include the elderly, young children and those prone to infections (e.g., HIV/AIDS patients).  The key is to implement measures to reduce exposure to mosquitoes. Individuals at risk should wear long-sleeved shirts and pants. Mosquito repellent should be used as well.

Every year, the Department of Health conducts WNV testing throughout the District, particularly in areas where infections have been reported. If you live in an affected area, you might receive additional information from the Department. Larvicide may be sprayed in your neighborhood. Should you require additional information about WNV, feel free to contact the D.C. Department of Health.

In the meantime, while mosquitoes are still flying around, here are a few things you could do stop the spread of the WNV:

1.  Dispose of cans, bottles and open containers properly.  Store items for recycling in covered containers.
2.  Remove discarded tires. Drill drainage holes in tires used on playground equipment.
3. Clean roof gutters and downspouts regularly.  Eliminate standing water from flat roofs.
4. Turn over plastic wading pools, wheelbarrows, and canoes when not in use.
5. Cover waste containers with tight-fitting lids; never allow lids or cans to accumulate water.
6. Flush bird baths and potted plant trays twice each week.
7. Adjust tarps over grills, firewood piles, boats or swimming pools to eliminate small pockets of water from standing   several days.
8. Re-grade low areas where water stands; clean debris in ditches to eliminate standing water in low spots.
9.¬†Maintain swimming pools, clean and chlorinate them as needed, aerate garden ponds and treat with ‚Äúmosquito dunks‚ÄĚ found at hardware stores.
10. Fix dripping water faucets outside and eliminate puddles from air conditioners.
11. Store pet food and water bowls inside when not in use.

Please share this information with your friends and neighbors.

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