Archive for the ‘Joint Commission’ Category

The Week in Review: did you miss last week’s posts on health, safety, medicine, law and healthcare? A sneak preview of the week ahead.

Saturday, March 26th, 2011

Eye Opener - Nash & Associates Blog

This week we are starting a weekly posting of our blogs of this past week, some key blogs of interest to our more than 6,500 monthly readers, and a sneak preview of what’s coming next week. We would really like for you to join our community of readers, so don’t forget to hit the RSS Feedburner button or subscribe to our blog, Eye Opener. We share with you our thoughts, insights and analysis of what’s new in the law, the world of law and medicine, health, patient and consumer safety as well as a host of other topics that we deal with as lawyers on a daily basis in trying to serve the needs of our clients.

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This Past Week

Birth Defect Updates: Warnings About Opioid Use Before and During Pregnancy In this post, Sarah Keogh, explored a new report which is vital information for women who are pregnant or thinking about becoming pregnant. Opiods, narcotic pain killers such as morphine, codeine, hydrocodone and oxycodone, are a valuable part of a physician’s drug armamentarium, but they can have significant implications for a fetus if taken during pregnancy or even just before a woman become pregnant. Read Sarah’s important piece, be informed and learn why you should discuss the use of any such drugs with your obstetrician/gynecologist before taking them.

 

Doctors Disciplined by Their Own Hospitals Escape Actions by Licensing Boards. Who’s at Fault? Brian Nash, founder of the firm, writes about a serious problem with this country’s medical licensing boards, who have failed, at an alarming rate, to take disciplinary action against physicians, who have had their hospital privileges revoked, suspended or curtailed for issues such as sub-standard care, moral transgressions and the like. Public Citizen brought this story to light; we analyze the issue and share our thoughts on this serious patient health and safety issue.

Decreasing Obesity Risks in Children: Another Benefit of Breastfeeding A mom herself and an advocate for public health childhood obesityand safety throughout her legal career, Sarah Keogh reports on a recent study covered by the Baltimore Sun about the long-term benefits of breastfeeding for at least six months. The issue for many, however, is – how can a family of two income earners afford to do this? Does our society and the workplace really lend itself to this practice? Read Sarah’s compelling piece and share your experience and thoughts.

The Week Ahead

Sneak preview of what’s ahead during the week of March 28, 2011:

medical technology

Brian Nash begins a series on the issue of medical technology and patient health/safety. Is the medical community being properly trained in the proper and safe use of all the new medical devices that are hitting our hospitals, clinics and medical offices? Is the rush to have the newest, shiniest and “best” new medical device really advancing the safe and effective delivery of healthcare in our country? Here’s a sneak preview…

Dr. Roper and so many other dedicated healthcare professionals are faced daily with the same issue – “…challenged by the task of putting lofty ideas into practice at the local level. I remain very committed to the effort, but we are daily challenged to put the best ideas into practice.” Put another way – at least for me – taking public healthcare policy and practices and making a much better widget.

As these lofty concepts were debated, published and analyzed, technology streaked along with its new bells and whistles at what some might call an amazing – almost mystifying – pace. Did you really envision yourself 25 years ago sitting with your iPhone or iPad and scouring the world’s news, chatting with your friends and followers on the other side of the planet, watching the latest streaming video of March Madness or sharing every random thought you have on Twitter or Facebook?

Some top posts you may have missed

What happens when your surgeon has been up all night and you are being wheeled into the operating room to be his or her next surgical case? We looked at an article from The New England Journal of Medicine that addressed this patient safety issue and made recommendations for change.  See our posting entitled A Surgeon’s Sleep Deprivation and Elective Surgery-Not a good (or safe) combination.

Dr. Kevin Pho, who is the well known editor and contributor of KevinMD.com, wrote a piece in which he espoused his belief that medical malpractice cases really do not improve patient safety. Having read this piece and finding that this was just too much to digest, Brian Nash wrote a counter-piece entitled Malpractice System Doesn’t Improve Patient Safety – Oh Really? What this led to was cross-posting by Dr. Kevin Pho on our blog, Eye Opener, and our posting on his blog. Our blog post (as best I can tell) led to one of the all-time highest postings of comments by readers of KevinMD. One thing all participants in the “debate” learned – we are both passionate about our positions. Read what led to this firestorm.

 

Study Finds Differences Among Doctors, Risk Managers in Admitting Errors – Joint Commission Resources – Answer: Just Tell the Truth!

Sunday, April 4th, 2010

The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety recently issued a report on how Risk Managers (those who handle claims in hospitals as part of their duties) vary from physicians in admitting errors.  The report was based on anonymous surveys of nearly 3,000 risk managers and roughly 1,300 physicians.

Some of the key findings from this survey were as follows:  

  • Risk managers have more favorable attitudes about disclosing errors to patients compared with physicians
  • Risk managers were less supportive of providing a full apology
  • Risk managers expressed more favorable attitudes about the mechanisms at their hospitals or health care organizations to inform physicians about errors
  • Both Risk Managers and physicians agreed that there is a lot of room for improvement in systems to report errors.

The news release issued by the Joint Commission then contains the following quote:

“Fulfilling patients’ expectations for full disclosure of medical errors remains a complicated process. Our data offer additional insight into the complexities of these conversations and reflect the evolving roles of stakeholders beyond the physicians involved in the error,” says lead author David J. Loren, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Pediatrics, at the University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.

Why is it so complicated?  This past Friday, I reported on an article from the New England Journal of Medicine, in which the concept of acknowledging wrongdoing early in the process is central to current programs to minimize litigation costs and seek alternative methods of coping with “national tort reform legislation.”

If physicians and risk managers only had some idea of how many people we interview for potential claims and lawsuits, who are seeking legal assistance because they ‘just want to know what happened’ or who are just plain angry because no one would talk to them about what went so terribly wrong or even ,in some instances, flat-out lied to them about what happened, they might not need to do a study to conclude – there is a “lot of room for improvement.”

I know – it’s fear of lawyers that leads the health care industry to have such angst over just telling the truth.  What they don’t get is that we, the lawyers, would probably have a lot less people calling us to investigate their claims if someone had just taken the time to figure out what went wrong and told the patient and/or the family the truth.