Archive for the ‘Cerebral Palsy’ Category

FES Equipment Coming to Baltimore’s Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital

Thursday, September 8th, 2011

Author - Sarah Keogh

Back in February, Jon Stefanuca wrote about a study in the Journal of Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair about Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) and the benefits it can provide to those individuals who have suffered spinal cord injuries. He explained how FES is able to provide electrical impulses to stimulate paralyzed muscles. The study’s authors found improvements based on using FES that led them to recommend using stimulation therapy in conjunction with occupational therapy for patients with incomplete spinal cord injuries. This technology is now also being used to help people with a wide range of injuries and illnesses including, stroke, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, and cerebral palsy, in addition to spinal cord injuries. According to the Christopher and Dana Reeves Foundation website, FES works by applying “small electrical pulses to paralyzed muscles to restore or improve their function”. The benefits can be extensive:

FES is commonly used for exercise, but also to assist with breathing, grasping, transferring, standing and walking. FES can help some to improve bladder and bowel function. There’s evidence that FES helps reduce the frequency of pressure sores. From: Christopher and Dana Reeves Foundation website

Improved Technology To Be Locally Available

Since FES was originally developed, the technology improved from being something that was typically integrated into large expensive equipment, such as exercise bikes and wheelchair based equipment, into smaller more portable devices. The good news for individuals with neuro-motor injuries in Baltimore City and the surrounding areas is that this type of FES treatment is about to become more available locally. At the end of August, Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital announced that they have received a “Quality of Life” grant from the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation. The article explains:

The money will help Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital purchase Bioness® equipment for its Adaptive Equipment Rehabilitation Clinic (the clinic). The clinic works with patients with neuro-motor disorders to maximize their movement as much as possible given their physical limitations.

From Bioness.com

The Bioness website explains that they produce a variety of “medical devices designed to benefit people with Stroke, Multiple Sclerosis, Traumatic Brain Injury, Cerebral Palsy, and Spinal Cord Injury. These products use electrical stimulation to help people regain mobility and independence, to improve quality of life and productivity.” While I do not know what particular equipment will be available at the Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital, Bioness makes equipment to assist patients with hand paralysis, foot drop and thigh weakness among other conditions.

MWPH Uses Interdisciplinary Approach Combining FES and Therapy

The article about the grant explains some of the many wonderful things available for patients at the Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital (MWPH):

  • …[an] interdisciplinary approach to the assessment and management of adolescents and children with neuromuscular impairments, paralysis and/or movement disorders
  • … [a] team of 21 experienced specialists in physiatry, occupational therapy, and physical therapy.

The new equipment at MWPH will be used along with the other occupational and physical therapy options available to patients. A study described in US Neurology looked at stroke victims and found the combination of FES and traditional therapies that include repeated motion provide the best results:

Stroke patients with limited voluntary movement could now benefit from technologies such as functional electrical stimulation (fes) combined with necessary repetition of functional tasks (use-dependent plasticity) to enhance the neural repair process and improve outcomes, thus enabling them to begin to overcome their previous limitations and to improve their physical capabilities.

From Bioness.com

The goal at MWPH for children and adolescents is based on a similar idea:

Patients whose muscles can be retrained will require several months of therapy to gain normal range of motion and strength. For those patients with more severe conditions where muscles cannot be retrained, the Bioness® equipment will be used to augment their range of motion. Using these two therapy modalities, patients will acquire greater functionality, range of motion, muscle strength, and the ability to move independently.

This multi-disciplinary approach should allow these children and teens to have the best chances of improved motor use and the most independence in their future lives.

Related Articles:

Coming Soon? Restored Breathing for Spinal Cord Injury Patients

Spinal Cord Injury Updates: More Reasons for Optimism?

New Treatment Holds Promise for Patients With Spinal Cord Injuries

New Microchip Promises to Make Life Much Easier for Paraplegic Patients

Service dogs in school — a fresh look

Friday, July 22nd, 2011
Service Dog and Boy

service dogs

A while back I wrote a piece on the topic of service dogs for kids and mentioned the use of service dogs in schools. A regular reader of our blog then wrote in with a number of comments and questions about the propriety of dogs in schools. To help answer her questions, I recently spoke with Nancy Fierer, who is the Director at Susquehanna Service Dogs in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, which is an organization that trains and places service dogs. Susquehanna is the organization that placed two of the dogs mentioned in this NPR story.

The ADA and dogs in school

I also did a little more research on the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) and its impact on the issue. The ADA requires that all public facilities allow a disabled person and his or her service dog (not pets) to enter the premises just the same as a non-disabled person. So is a school considered a public facility? It’s an interesting question. On the one hand it is accessible to the public in the sense that parents and students can freely enter a school. However, if you’re not the parent of a child at the school, can you just walk into a school and roam the halls like you might roam around a mall? I think if you tried that, you would get stopped pretty quickly and asked to leave if you had no valid business there. However, the law appears to be settled that schools are considered public facilities at least for those areas that are open to the public such as administrative offices, gymnasiums during sporting events, and auditoriums during public events. Therefore, schools must be accessible to service dogs in these public areas. For class rooms, however, it’s not so clear. While the law appears to favor allowing service dogs in class rooms, it is being decided on a case-by-case basis because there are other considerations as well – the age of the child, the disability at issue, the ability to control the dog, etc.

How much school assistance is necessary?

I have to admit that when I first wrote on this topic, I had envisioned that the dog and child were a self-contained unit that required little in the way of adult assistance. Ms. Fierer indicated that that is usually not the case. Depending on the age of the child and the level of disability, the child may be able to care for the dog independently. However, in most instances an adult (teacher’s aide or nurse perhaps) is required to pitch in with help giving the dog water and taking it out for bathroom breaks. Ms. Fierer indicated that the dog does need water breaks during the day (feeding can be done at home before and after school). This is usually accomplished by keeping a water bowl in a nearby room – perhaps a nurse’s office or a counselor’s office. Several times a day, either the child (if he/she is old enough) or an adult can take the dog for a drink. The same is true for bathroom breaks (pee only; No. 2 is usually taken care of at home). Again, service dogs do require assistance from the school but from what Ms. Fierer told me, the disruption is fairly minimal and can be worked out with proper planning.

Controlling a service dog

A larger issue is the child’s ability to control the dog. Even though service dogs are highly trained, the owner (in this case a child) must still be able to control the dog before being permitted to take a dog into school. These include such basic commands as making the dog sit, stay, come, leave it, and walk on loose leash. These are some of the common commands that all service dogs must know. In addition, a service dog also receives additional training in a particular disability and learns specific commands unique to that disability, e.g., retrieving specific items, pulling a wheelchair, responding to seizures, search and rescue. These commands must be mastered as well. For example, if an autistic child is in need of the dog to put its head in the child’s lap to help calm him/her down, the child (or a trained adult) has to be able to give the dog that command. If the child cannot give that command to the dog, then it undermines the usefulness of the dog in school.

Because of the demands that service dogs place on the child, very young children usually do not take dogs to school unescorted. Ms. Fierer said she would be surprised to see a six-year-old, for example, taking a dog to school alone. Older children can, with proper training, be permitted to take a dog to school alone. To ensure that the child is capable of caring for the dog, Susquehanna utilizes the Assistance Dogs International Public Access Test. This test requires the owner and the dog to perform multiple tests in a variety of settings to ensure that the dog is well-trained and that the owner can properly control the dog. For children, Ms. Fierer indicated that the testing is usually administered with the parent and child because she uses the team approach – the parent, child and dog are a team. For a child taking the dog to school, however, the parent is usually not there so the child must be able to control the dog independently. Only when a child is adept at controlling the dog should the child be permitted to take the dog to school. Even then, parents have to work closely with the child’s teacher and other school staff to coordinate the details of how the dog will be cared for.

Other concerns

Our reader also asked questions about whether service dogs are a distraction in school and whether they can pose a danger to other children. After talking to Ms. Fierer, it’s my opinion that these are not major concerns. As for being a distraction, Ms. Fierer said that is usually not the case. Service dogs are generally introduced into the school gradually, starting with maybe a half-hour per day and building from there. The children get accustomed to the dog and the novelty soon wears off. Also, the other children need to be educated that this is a service dog and not a pet to be played with. Children can easily learn this lesson. As for being a danger to other children, Ms. Fierer said she has never heard of a dangerous incident happening at school such as a dog biting a child. These dogs are amazingly well-trained and the trainers allow zero tolerance for aggressive behavior. If a dog shows any aggression, that dog does not make the cut for being a service dog. Therefore, I don’t believe this concern is a valid reason for denying a child a service dog.

Training a service dog

In terms of the actual training given to the dogs, Ms. Fierer said that when a puppy is eight weeks old, it starts living with a dedicated puppy handler who is responsible for teaching the dog basic manners.  This time includes classes at Susquehanna twice per month.  This arrangement goes on till the dog is 18 months old, at which time the dog receives about six months of intense training.  About 50-60 percent of training is the same for all service dogs. The rest is devoted to the unique needs of each disability. Before a dog is placed, Susquehanna spends about 2 and ½ weeks training the family that is receiving the dog. Even after placement, Susquehanna continues to do follow-up training – at first on a weekly basis and then gradually declining over the next six months. It even does annual re-testing.

I hope this follow-up addresses our readers’ concerns. Ms. Fierer emphasized that service dogs are not the solution for every child. Susquehanna actually does therapy sessions with families before even agreeing to place a dog to ensure that the dog and the family are a good fit. She indicated that it is a big responsibility to own a service dog and it is not a decision that is made lightly by the dog trainers. However, for the right child and the right family, a service dog can be an amazing asset.

Related Nash and Associates Links:

Service Dogs for Kids

 

photo from servicedogtraining.wordpress.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dealing with Cerebral Palsy: A Resource for Parents and Family (Part III)

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2011

In Part I of this series I provided a basic introduction to dealing with cerebral palsy.  I also provided Maryland parents with a comprehensive list of places that are able to assist parents.  In Part II I discussed educating children with cerebral palsy and provided a list of places to turn if you need help.  Today we will take a look at some of the medical treatments available for cerebral palsy.

Medical Treatment

Cerebral Palsy cannot be cured, but treatment can often improve a child’s capabilities. Progress due to medical research means that many patients can enjoy near-normal lives if their neurological problems are properly managed. There is no standard therapy that works for all patients; the physician must work with a team of other health care professionals to identify a child’s unique needs and impairments.  Typically, an individual treatment plan is created to addresses them.  As a general rule, the earlier diagnosis and treatment begins, the better chance a child has of overcoming developmental disabilities or learning new ways to accomplish difficult tasks.  The goal of treatment is to help the person be as independent as possible.

Treatment requires a team approach, including:

  • Primary care doctor
  • Dentist (dental check-ups are recommended around every 6 months)
  • Social worker
  • Nurses
  • Occupational, physical, and speech therapists
  • Other specialists, including a neurologist, rehabilitation physician, pulmonologist, and gastroenterologist

Treatment is based on the person’s symptoms and the need to prevent complications.  Self and home care include:

  • Getting enough food and nutrition
  • Keeping the home safe
  • Performing exercises recommended by the health care providers
  • Practicing proper bowel care (stool softeners, fluids, fiber, laxatives, regular bowel habits)
  • Protecting the joints from injury

Putting the child in regular schools is recommended, unless physical disabilities or mental development makes this impossible. Special education or schooling may help.

The following may help with communication and learning:

  • Glasses
  • Hearing aids
  • Muscle and bone braces
  • Walking aids
  • Wheelchairs

Physical therapy, occupational therapy, orthopedic help, or other treatments may also be needed to help with daily activities and care.

Medications may include:

  • Anticonvulsants to prevent or reduce the frequency of seizures
  • Botulinum toxin to help with spasticity and drooling
  • Muscle relaxants (baclofen) to reduce tremors and spasticity

Surgery may be needed in some cases to:

  • Control gastroesophageal reflux
  • Cut certain nerves from the spinal cord to help with pain and spasticity
  • Place feeding tubes
  • Release joint contractures

What is important, however, is that an individualized approach be taken for your child.

Query:  Does your child have cerebral palsy?  What medical treatments are you providing for your child?

 

 

Credits to http://www.nlm.nih.gov; www.nsnn.com

How Do I Choose A Lawyer? A Helpful Guide

Monday, June 20th, 2011

One of the most important things you can do if you are considering a lawsuit is to spend time doing a proper search for the lawyer, who will be handling your case.

Just because a law firm or a lawyer has a fancy webpage or an eye-catching ad in your local phone directory or even a professional looking TV commercial does not mean that this lawyer has a clue what he/she is doing in the specialized areas of medical malpractice or catastrophic personal injury.

We invite you to read and consider the issues and questions raised in our White Paper – “How to Choose a Lawyer.”

If you have other ideas or questions that you believe would be helpful to our readers in their search for a lawyer, post your reply on this topic so others may benefit by your insights.

 

Image courtesy of www.quadtechint.com

 

Week in Review: (June 13 – June 17, 2001) Eye Opener Health, Law and Medicine Blog

Saturday, June 18th, 2011

Eye  Opener’s Week in Review

 

Jason Penn

From the Editor:  Today marks the end of week two as “guest” editor for the Eye Opener. I can tell you that the title “editor” is a misnomer. When it comes to the Eye Opener and its panel of bloggers, very little (if any) editing takes place. Consistently, our blawgers provide you with timely and topical posts. This week was no different. Let’s take a retrospective look at what the “Eye Opener” offered this week (and, of course, a sneak peek at the week ahead.)

– Jason Penn, Guest Editor

 

(Many thanks to Jason and all those back at the firm, who helped get the word out on some great topics this past week while I’ve been wrapping-up week #2 of the trial from hell…….Brian Nash)

July 1 – New Residents, New Rules……Again!

By: Theresa Neumann

While the loss of sleep is rarely a topic on Gray’s Anatomy (or any made-for-television medical drama), it is a genuine quandary for non-actor, medical residents. This past Monday, Theresa Neumann explored the ACGME’s limitations on the hours worked by medical residents in the United States. As Theresa explained, the overall maximum hours per week will not change; it remains at 80 hours.  One big change is the limit on the maximum continuous duty period for first year residents; this will be decreased from 24 to 16 hours.  It will remain 24 hours for residents after their first year, but recommendations include “strategic napping.” Curious about the other changes?  Read more

Newest Word on Crib Safety: Ban the Bumpers?

By: Sarah Keogh

Sleep isn’t only important for medical residents; it is also important for the smallest members of our families. As Sara Keogh explained on Tuesday, Maryland is considering regulations to ban the sale of crib bumpers. For many years, more and more emphasis has been placed on infants sleeping in safe cribs without any additional “stuff” in them. This has included the elimination of lots of former nursery staples. Baby blankets, stuffed animals, pillows and other loose items have been banned from the crib by safety experts for years. As requirements for cribs have required slats that are closer together, the utility of using a bumper to help a child from getting stuck between crib slats has been eliminated. More recently, the Consumer Product Safety Commission has developed even newer crib safety standards, including eliminating the use of drop-sides, and warned against the use of sleep positioners. Yet, despite the advice to put babies to sleep only on their backs in cribs empty of everything except a well fitting mattress and fitted sheet, many parents and caregivers persist in using other items in cribs. Now, with an increasing number of deaths associated with crib bumpers, Maryland is considering a stronger stance. Read more

Legal Boot Camp Class Four. Sean and Kristy’s Story: How a Jury Award is Conformed to the Cap

By: John Stefanuca

On Wednesday blogger Jon Stefanuca broke out his calculator:  bootcamp style.  In the state of Maryland, there is a cap on the damages that can be awarded.  But what happens when a jury returns a verdict in excess of the statutory amount?  Mathematics and law intersect.

To see the results, and a detailed explanation of how it all works, you can read more ….

 

Confusion with Advanced Directives: Palliative Care, End-of-Life and Hospice Care

By: Theresa Neumann

With the death of the always controversial Jack Kevorkian, we revisited a post by Theresa Neumann.  Breathing a little life into the post (pun intended), Theresa provides an excellent primer for readers that are facing end of life situations.  The differences are nuanced and can be difficult to understand at a most difficult time. Are you sure you know the difference between palliative, end-of-life and hospice care?  Read more

Acquired Brain Injuries: Subdural Hematomas

By: Theresa Neumann

When Humpty Dumpty fell, they were able to put him back together again.  Because our lives are nothing like a children’s nursery rhyme, when we fall, we get hurt.  A head injury is particularly serious. Have you ever bumped your head and developed a “goose-egg?” It’s truly amazing how fast that big bruise under the skin grows. That bruise, or hematoma, is from a broken blood vessel, usually a vein. The pressure from the swelling helps with clotting, along with the blood’s own clotting factors. This types of hematoma typically takes a week or more to go away. If it’s on the forehead, it’s often followed by one or two “black eyes.”  That’s because the blood tends to spread along  tissue planes, and gravity notoriously pulls everything downward causing it to pool in the eye sockets, where the blood cells degrade and their components are reabsorbed by the body. Unlike a fairy tale, however, this goose-egg can be serious.  Read more

Sneak Peak of the Week Ahead:

As I told you at the beginning, the Eye Opener’s writers continue in their efforts to provide you with timely and topical blogs for your reading pleasure. As evidenced by the above, this past week was no exception. The Eye Opener and its writers are excited about the week ahead too!  Here’s a sneak peak of what’s in store for you:

  • Service dogs for children:  more than just a pet
  • Changes in Sunscreen:  will regulation prevent cancer?
  • HIV Patients:  Increased risk for developing cancer
  • Legal Boot Camp is back in session and Part III of our Cerebral Palsy tutorial.

Wishing You and Yours a Great Week Ahead!

Images courtesy of:

www.theepochtiems.com

www.sleepzine.com

www.nailsmag.com

www.aginglongevity

 

 


Week in Review: (June 6 – June 10, 2011) Eye Opener Health, Law and Medicine Blog

Saturday, June 11th, 2011

 

A Word of Special Thanks…

From the Editor:

I am so grateful to my bloggers and friends at the firm for all their hard work this week. I started a  multi-week trial this past Tuesday, but in my absence, the Eye Opener kept rolling right along thanks to them. Special thanks to Jason Penn, who took over the task of making sure the schedule was kept and the blogs got posted.

Brian Nash

 

From Jason Penn -

It is time to take a look back at the week that was.  With the temperatures soaring in the Baltimore-Washington area, the Eye Opener did its best to keep pace with the thermometer.  Five posts, five days.  All while the lawyers prepared for upcoming trials.  Not too shabby, if you ask me.  Without further ado, lets take a look at retrospective look:

The Death of a Baby – Economic Realities

By: Michael Sanders

The loss of a child, particularly an infant, is one of the most difficult and painful horrors anyone could every have to deal with.  Writing about it isn’t much easier.  Nonetheless, on Monday, blawger Michael Sanders’ post provided insight into the economics of lawsuits involving the death of an unborn child.  It is truly a “must read” for anyone that is contemplating taking legal action for the loss of their child.  The interplay between gestation, age of death and so-called “survival actions” is particularly tricky.  Mike lays out Maryland’s law on the topic and gives helpful primer for parent and practitioner alike.  Read more

Can A Simple Image Guide Nutrition?

By: Sarah Keogh

Obesity in America, particularly among our youth is a serious problem.  The problem itself certainly isn’t new but the approaches to promote healthy eating certainly have been. On Tuesday, Sara Keough pulled up to the table and reviewed the new MyPlate image and its impact on America’s unhealthy eating habits.  As I am sure you know, there have been a variety of methods to improve our nation’s eating habits. In most recent memory is the ostracized food pyramid and the First Lady’s “Let’s Move Campaign” (and associated dance moves). Sara provided her perspective on the new eating tool as both an individual and a parent.  I personally am curious: for the parents out there, will this change the way you handle your children’s nutrition?  Read more

Legal Boot Camp (Class Three): Sean and Kristy’s Story – Wrongful Death and Survival Actions

By: Jon Stefanuca

On Wednesday, Jon Stefanuca provided the third installment of our Legal Boot Camp. With class in session, Jon presented the following scenario:  Last month, Sean turned 24.  He and Kristy are married. Their daughter, Kira, is 2-years old. Sean just entered medical school. Kristy’s parents support them, while Sean is in school.  Sean has never held a job.  Kristy is a stay at home mom. A month ago, Sean was driving home when a drunk driver pushed him off the road. In the accident, Sean broke his sternum. He also sustained a number of vascular injuries, which caused internal bleeding. He was rushed to the nearest hospital. Soon after his arrival, Sean underwent surgery to stop the bleeding.

Sean was recovering beautifully. Unfortunately, on his third day in the hospital, he developed rapid breathing, shortness of breath, and his chest pain got worse. A CT scan of the chest revealed that Sean had a pulmonary embolism. The physician ordered 100 mg of anticoagulation medication.  The nurse misread the order and made a mistake in its administration. The overdose caused Sean to have extensive bleeding. Sean was scheduled for discharge within the next 3 days. Instead, he died within a few hours.

What legal action could Kristy take?  Read more

Dealing with Cerebral Palsy: A Resource for Parents and Family (Part II)

By: Jason Penn

On Thursday, Jason Penn provided us with Part II of his series “Dealing with Cerebral Palsy:  A Resource for Parents and Family.”  Part II of the series takes a look at educating children with cerebral palsy.  Children that have special needs that impact his/her ability to learn at school often qualify for an Individual Education Plan.

An IEP is a legal document created to ensure your child’s teacher, staff and administration understands his learning and other limitations and utilizes the best practices to ensure that he gets the education that he/she deserves.  Curious about an IEP?  Read more

How Much Is Your Marriage Worth?

By: Michael Sanders

To finish up the week, Michael Sanders returned, and asked the question: What is Your Marriage Worth?  If you’re married, there is category of damages that you may be able to recover – damage to your marriage. It’s called Loss of Consortium and is an important element of damages in the right circumstances. It is a legal recognition that the marital relationship itself – separate and apart from the injury to the individual – is a protected interest that is deserving of compensation if it has been harmed by the negligence of another person.  Read more…

Sneak Peak of the Week Ahead:

With the weather taking a turn for the better (hopefully), and the local sports teams showing renewed vigor, we are going to keep up the pace. As you finish up this week, and turn to the next, you can look forward to the following:

  • Service dogs for children:  more than just a pet
  • Subdural Hemorrhages – “Man, is my head aching…”
  • HIV Patients:  Increased risk for developing cancer
  • Crib bumpers & safety
  • Legal Boot Camp is back in session and Part III of our Cerebral Palsy tutorial.

Have a safe weekend, Everyone!

Dealing with Cerebral Palsy: A Resource for Parents and Family (Part II)

Thursday, June 9th, 2011

In Part I of this series I provided a basic introduction to dealing with cerebral palsy.  I also provided Maryland parents with a comprehensive list of places that are able to assist parents.  Today I will discuss educating children with cerebral palsy and, as always, I will provide you with a list of places to turn if you need help.

Educating your child

The thought of educating any child is a daunting topic.  Educating your special needs child can present a variety of challenges and pitfalls.  It is unlikely that any singular blog post could ever cover every facet of educating your special needs child.  What I can do, however, is provide you with an introduction to the topic, its terminology, and finally give you a list of resources that you can turn to for additional help.

As we introduced last week, children that have special needs that impact his/her ability to learn at school often qualify for an Individual Education Plan.  An IEP is a legal document created to ensure your child’s teacher, staff and administration understands his learning and other limitations and utilizes the best practices to ensure that he gets the education that he/she deserves.  An IEP is federally funded and falls under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act or “IDEA.” IDEA entitles your child to a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) designed “to meet unique needs and prepare for employment and independent living” (20 U.S.C.A. 1400(d)(1)(A)).  Just as every child is different, every child’s IEP should be different.  Here are some of the accommodations that can be included in your child’s IEP:

-classroom accommodations, e.g. special table

-curriculum modification

-speech and/or occupational therapy

Be forewarned, anecdotally, many parents have reported that obtaining an IEP for their child has been difficult.  Be not dismayed, a document binding the school to provide your child with the specialized attention that he/she needs is invaluable.  Please utilize the resources listed below to assist you in getting all necessary help for your child.

When it has been determined that your child has a mental or physical disability that impairs his learning, the school will set up an IEP meeting. An IEP team is formed and includes:

-Your child

-Parent or guardian

-A district representative

-A special educator

-Other teachers who will be involved in your child’s education

You and the IEP team will meet to discuss your child’s specific needs and goals for the school year. Steps will be outlined as to how your child will be accommodated each day in the classroom. A progress report should then be sent to you periodically to demonstrate that your child is indeed meeting her IEP learning goals.

Lastly, keep in mind that if your child does not qualify for an IEP, he/she may qualify for a 504 Plan, a document legislated by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). 504 Plans are less specific than an IEP and, unfortunately, do not have the legal teeth that an IEP has. Another alternative is to try to qualify your child for an Other Health Impaired (OHI) plan. An OHI is like a “last resort” document for kids who are denied a 504 Plan or an IEP. Essentially, OHI status was created to satisfy parents who insist that their child needs documented assistance in school.

Not sure where to turn?  Below is the up-to-date contact information for agencies in the District of Columbia and Maryland that can assist you.

Parental Support:

UCP of Washington DC & Northern Virginia
1818 New York Avenue, NE, Suite 101
Washington, DC 20002
Phone: (202) 526-0146
Fax: (202) 526-0519
3135 8th Street NE
Washington DC 20017
Phone: (202) 269-1500
Fax: (202) 526-0159
E-mail: webmaster@ucpdc.org
Web: http://www.ucpdc.org

Office on Aging
441 4th Street, NW, 9th Floor
Washington, DC 20001
Phone: (202) 676-3900

Regional ADA Technical Assistance Agency
ADA and IT Information Center for the Mid Atlantic Region
451 Hungerford Drive, Suite 607
Rockville, MD 20850
Phone: (301) 217-0124 (V/TTY); (800) 949-4232 (V/TTY/Toll Free)
E-mail: adainfo@transcen.org
Web: http://www.adainfo.org

Capitol Area ADAPT
Marcie Roth
Phone: (410) 828-8274; (410) 821-1157
Fax: (410) 828-6706
E-mail: marcie@erols.com

The Cerebral Palsy Ability Center (CPAC)
2445 Army-Navy Drive, 3rd Floor
Arlington, VA 22206
Phone: (703) 920-0600
Fax: (703) 685-2819
E-mail: cpac@cpabilitycenter.org
Web: http://www.cpabilitycenter.org

State Developmental Disabilities Planning Council
DC Developmental Disabilities Council
Department of Human Services/801 East Building
2700 Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue, S.E.
Washington, DC 20032
Phone: (202) 279-6085
Web: http://www.dc.gov/agencies

Easter Seal Society for Disabled Children & Adults, Inc.
Metro. DC, Northern VA, & MD
4041 Powder Mill Road
Calverton, MD 20705
Phone: (301) 931-8700; (800) 886-3771 (Toll Free)
Fax: (301) 931-8690
Web: http://www.nca-md.easter-seals.org

Goodwill Industries Greater Washington
2200 South Dakota Avenue, NE
Washington, DC 20018
Phone: (202) 636-4225
Fax: (202) 526-3994
E-mail: dmgi@dcgoodwill.org
Web: http://www.dcgoodwill.org

Family Voices Washington DC
Gail Johnson
Phone: (301) 470-0256

Programs for Children with Special Health Care Needs
Health Services for Children with Special Needs Clinic
D.C. General Hospital, Building 10
19th & Massachusetts Avenue, S.E.
Washington, DC 20003
Phone: (202) 675-5214

CHIP Program (health care for low-income uninsured children)
DC Healthy Families Insurance Program
4601 North Fairfax Drive
Arlington, VA 22203
Phone: (888) 557-1116 (Toll Free)
Web: http://www.dchealth.dc.gov

Learning Disabilities Association of Washington, DC
1848 Columbia Road, NW, #45
Washington, DC 20009
Phone: (202) 265-8869; (410) 396-0518

The Arc of the District of Columbia, Inc.
900 Varnum Street, NE
Washington, DC 20017
Phone: (202) 636-2950
Web: www.arcdc.net

Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy Institute
801 Buchanan Street, N.E.
Washington, DC 20017
Phone: (202) 281-2774
E-mail: mward@kennedyinstitute.org

State Mental Retardation Program
Mental Retardation/Developmental Disabilities Administration
Commission on Social Services
Department of Human Services
429 O Street, N.W., #202
Washington, DC 20001
Phone: (202) 673-7678
TTY: (202) 673-3580

American Association on Mental Retardation
444 North Capitol Street NW, #846
Washington DC 20001
Phone: (202) 387-1968; (800) 424-3688 (Toll Free)
Fax: (202) 387-2193
Web: http://www.AAMR.org

Programs for Children and Youth who are Blind or Visually Impaired
Visual Impairment Unit
DC Rehabilitation Services Administration
810 1st Street, N.E., 9th Floor
Washington, DC 20002
Phone: (202) 442-8628

Special Format Library
District of Columbia Regional Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped
901 G Street, N.W., Room 215
Washington, DC 20001
Phone: (202) 727-2142
TTY: (202) 727-2145
E-mail: dc1alyons@hotmail.com
Web: http://dclibrary.org/lbph

American Foundation for the Blind
11 Penn Plaza, Suite 300
New York, NY 10001
Phone: (212) 502-7600
TTY: (212) 502-7662
E-mail: afbinfo@afb.org
Web: http://www.afb.org

DC Early Intervention Program
717 14th Street, N.W., Suite 1200
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: (202) 727-5371

Mayor’s Committee on Persons with Disabilities
810 First Street, NE
Room 10015
Washington, DC 20002
Phone: (202) 442-8673
Fax: (202) 442-8742

D.C. Vocational Rehabilitation Agency
Rehabilitation Services Administration
Department of Human Services
810 First Street, NE, 10th Floor
Washington, DC 20002
Phone: (202) 442-8663

State Job Training Partnership Act
Department of Employment Services
500 C Street, NW, Suite 600
Washington, DC 20001
Phone: (202) 724-7100

Parent Teacher Association (PTA)
D.C. Congress of Parents and Teachers
Hamilton School
6th Street & Brentwood Parkway, NE
Washington, DC 20002
Phone: (202) 543-0333
Fax: (202) 543-4306
E-mail: dc_pres@pta.org

The National Coalition for Parent Involvement in Education (NCPIE)
P.O. Box 39
1201 16th Street, NW
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: (202) 822-8405
Fax: (202) 822-4050
E-mail: ferguson@ncea.com
Web: http://www.NCPIE.org

Parents’ Special Education Service Center
Phone: (202) 471-4272
E-mail: parenttips@shs.net

Special Olympics District of Columbia
900 2nd Street, N.E., Suite 200
Washington, DC 20002
Phone: (202) 408-2640
Fax: (202) 408-2646
Web: http://www.specialolympicsdc.org

Nation’s Capital Handicapped Sports
P.O. Box 1546
Olney, MD 20830-1546
Phone/Fax: (301) 208-8949

Washington D.C. Education Resources:

Chief State School Officer
District of Columbia Public Schools
The Presidential Building
415 12th Street, NW
Washington, DC 20004
Phone: (202) 724-4222
Fax: (202) 724-8855
Web: http://www.k12.dc.us

Office of State Coordinator of Vocational Education for Students with Disabilities
Vocational Transition Services Unit
Walker Jones Elementary School
1st and K Street, NW
Washington, DC 20001
Phone: (202) 724-3878

State Department of Adult Education
Public Schools Vocational and Adult Education
1709 3rd Street, NE
Washington, DC 20002
Phone: (202) 576-6308
Fax: (202) 576-7899
E-mail: NRC%bell@mercury.k12.dc.us

Department of Education: Special Education
Division of Special Education
DC Public Schools
825 North Capitol Street, N.E., Suite 6100
Washington, DC 20002
Phone: (202) 442-4800
Web: http://www.k12.dc.us

State Coordinator for NCLB (No Child Left Behind)
Division of Special Education
DC Public Schools
825 North Capitol Street, N.E., 6th Floor
Washington, DC 20002
Phone: (202) 442-4800
Web: http://www.k12.dc.us

Branch of Exceptional Education/BIA
Mail Stop 3512, MIB Code 523
1849 C Street, NW
Washington, DC 202040-4000
Phone: (202) 208-4975
Fax: (202) 273-0030

Maryland Education Resources:

STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION: SPECIAL EDUCATION
Carol Ann Baglin, Assistant State Superintendent
Department of Education, Division of Special Education
Early Intervention Services
200 West Baltimore Street
Baltimore, MD 21201-2595
(410) 767-0238
E-mail: cbaglin@msde.state.md.us
Web: www.msde.state.md.us

Query:  Have you obtained an IEP for your child?  Did you have any opposition from your child’s teachers or school administrators?

Sneak Peek:  Next week (Part III of this series) we will provide Educational Resources for Parents in Maryland and present critical medical information that parents of CP children need to be aware of.

The death of a baby – the economic realities

Monday, June 6th, 2011

I recently wrote a blog about the grief that parents suffer when they lose an unborn child. At the risk of sounding crass, I want to now discuss the economics of lawsuits involving the death of an unborn child. For those contemplating taking legal action for the loss of their child, I hope this provides some useful information for you to consider.

Maryland courts have carved out specific rules for when an unborn child is considered a person capable of recovering damages in the event of death. The primary rule is that if a baby is actually born alive, no matter at what gestational age, that baby is considered a person with legal rights. So, if a 20-week baby is born alive and then dies one minute later, that baby is considered a “person,” and a lawsuit can be filed on behalf of the estate for that baby’s pain and suffering, otherwise known as a Survival Action.

(This leads to an interesting question – does a fetus feel pain? See Related Links below). The parents of the unborn child can also file what is known as a Wrongful Death action for their own economic and non-economic damages resulting from the death of their baby, primarily their grief and emotional loss over the death of their child. Survival actions and Wrongful Death actions are two separate claims, although they are usually pursued in the same lawsuit.

When a baby dies before birth, however, another question has to be asked: was the baby viable or not? Viability means that a baby is able to live outside the womb, even though he or she may require serious medical intervention. The current thinking is that babies are viable at around 22 weeks. The courts have made the rule that if an unborn child dies before the age of viability, that baby is not yet a “person” and has no legal rights. There can be no Survival Action and there can be no Wrongful Death action. If, however, the baby has reached the age of viability, then the baby is considered “a person” with legal rights, even if the baby was never born alive. Confusing? Yes it is.

The Maryland Courts were following the ruling in Roe v. Wade that a mother had a constitutional right to abort a non-viable baby. Therefore, a non-viable baby was not legally considered a person. If the baby was not a person, then no lawsuit could be filed on behalf of the estate of that baby, nor could the parents file a wrongful death action. So in order for a Survival Action or a Wrongful Death action to lie for an unborn baby, that baby has to have reached at least 22 weeks of gestation.

To make things even more confusing, the Maryland courts have carved out an exception to the above rules. Let’s consider the example of a non-viable baby (i.e., less than 22 weeks gestation) who dies before birth as a result of someone else’s negligence that injures the mother.

A common situation occurs when the mother (let’s say she’s 8 weeks pregnant) is injured in a car accident and suffers a miscarriage as a result. Looking at the above rules, one would think that no claim is allowed. However, the courts have said not so fast. In this circumstance, while the mother cannot recover for the grief of losing her child (because the child is non-viable and, therefore, not legally a person), she can recover for similar damages, including:

  • The depression, anguish, and grief caused by the termination of the pregnancy;
  • The manner in which the pregnancy was terminated;
  • Having to carry a baby which was killed by someone else’s tortious conduct; and
  • Having to witness the stillborn child or the fetal tissue that was to be her child.

I realize this itemization of damages sounds awfully close to the damages permitted in a Wrongful Death action – the very damages that are not allowed in the case of a non-viable baby. It is confusing, to say the least. The courts are trying to find a way to compensate a woman who is injured and loses her non-viable baby as a result of someone else’s negligence, while remaining true to prior precedent in this state that there is no Wrongful Death action allowed in the case of a non-viable baby.

Lastly, keep in mind that Maryland’s cap on non-economic damages applies to cases involving the death of an unborn baby. Economic damages (medical bills, lost wages) are usually very small in such cases. There are no lost wages because we’re talking about a baby, and the medical bills are usually small.

The value of these cases is in the emotional pain and suffering of the parents, and the physical pain and suffering of the baby (assuming a viable baby). Under Maryland law, the maximum allowable recovery for such a claim is $868,750 in a medical negligence action (assuming Mom and Dad both file a wrongful death action).

Under the hypothetical of the mother seeking recovery for the loss of a non-viable baby, the maximum allowable recovery is $695,000 if the allegation is medical negligence, and $755,000 if the allegation is non-medical negligence. (The Maryland Legislature has for some strange reason imposed different caps depending on whether the negligence is medical or non-medical, e.g., a car accident).

As for the question of whether an unborn child feels pain, please click on the link below for a blog by Brian Nash on this very issue.

Related Nash and Associates Links

Does a fetus feel pain

Hysteria over malpractice “crisis”

 

 

 

Week in Review: (May 22 – 28, 2011) The Eye Opener Health, Law and Medicine Blog

Saturday, May 28th, 2011

From the Editor – Brian Nash

Last week’s posts by our blawgers were packed with information about a variety of topics ranging from the medicine you need to know about concussions, living with cancer, cerebral palsy resources and the potential risks of overdosing your child with medications.

On the legal front, we began a series I’m personally excited about. We call it Legal Boot Camp. It will be a series for those in our practice jurisdictions of Maryland and Washington, D.C. Our teacher’s face is on – lesson plans in place. We hope you learn some things about the laws that can affect your lives in the areas of personal injury – particularly medical malpractice law.  Our first class took place with a piece by Sarah Keogh that examines the law in Maryland on the right to claim loss/diminished earning capacity. If you’re wondering if you can have such a claim even if you weren’t working when you were injured, Sarah has some information for you. Check it out. Turn in your class card and have some fun.

We wrapped up the week with a piece by yours truly on a wonderful community outreach program by our local baseball heroes, the Baltimore Orioles. Aptly named – OriolesREACH, this initiative has a number of wonderful events, charities and missions that are worth knowing about. One in particular, Shannon’s Fund, is a great program to help those in need while dealing with the financial burdens while dealing with cancer. It is run by the University of Maryland Medical Center. Read about our challenge to our brethren before the bar in the Greater Baltimore Area.

Without further ado, here are the blogs we posted this past week …. and a sneak peak of the week ahead.

Concussions: The Message of Brian Roberts’ Injury Should Not Go Unheeded

Posted by Brian Nash

Anyone who follows sports is well aware that finally the old school mentality of “gut it out and get back in there” following blows to the head are coming (not too soon) to an end. Committees have been formed, articles written and the national spotlight of the media have finally focused on this issue. Those recommendations, debates and guidelines are beyond the scope of this post. Nevertheless, those involved in sports…Read more >

Children’s Medications: Coming Changes and Tips to Avoid Overdose

Posted by Sarah Keogh

My children are both young; the youngest is now a little past her second birthday. In the last few years, we have had both infant and children medication in the house, liquid and tablets, and I have been very careful to make sure to double-check myself if I ever have to medicate either child to make sure that I am reading the correct dosing matrix for the correct concentration and for the correct child. More often than not, I have found that children need medication when their parents are tired. As parents know – children frequently…Read more >

 

Living With Cancer: What to Expect After the Diagnosis

Posted by Jon Stefanuca

About a million and a half people will be diagnosed with cancer in the U.S. this year. The devastating truth about cancer is that about one-third of these people will die from cancer at some point. For most, the diagnosis is unexpected and completely overwhelming.The cancer does not just affect how one feels, it undermines all sense of security and stability. It changes lifestyles and redefines relationships. So often the emotional trauma is equally shared among family members and loved ones. Read more >

New Blog Series: Legal Boot Camp

Posted by Brian Nash

I’m really pleased to announce a new series we’re starting today. If you’re a reader of our blog, you know that we post numerous times a week on health, safety, medicine and related law topics. That’s what we do in our firm – we represent people who are injured by the negligence of health care providers and those who suffer catastrophic injuries in non-medical settings as well. So, sharing what we believe is some good information about medical, health and safety issues is our mission. We strongly believe that our social networking should be about giving good information, engaging in dialogue about relevant issues – just plain good, old sharing. Read more >

Legal Boot Camp (First Class): The Story of Pam – Maryland’s Law on Loss of Earning Capacity

Posted by Sarah Keogh

A 41-year-old woman, Pam, who was laid off from her job as a swimming instructor and swim coach in December of 2009, has been struggling to find a new position for the last few years. Even though Pam had been working as a swimming instructor full-time for the past 18 years, she felt that she needed to jump into a new career while waiting to find a new position as a swimming instructor and coach. Starting in October of 2010, her father died leaving her a rundown home that he had recently purchased with the intent of renovating it. Pam felt that she could put her physical fitness and knowledge of home aesthetics to work, not to mention the ideas she picked up watching renovations shows while unemployed, by renovating the home her father left… Read more >

Dealing with Cerebral Palsy: A Resource for Parents and Family

Posted by Jason Penn

Today’s society has become increasingly dependent on aggregators. We use a variety of methods to assemble and sort information so that we can easily consume it.  Mint.com and Quicken help with our finances and Google Reader helps to manage our online content. A quick search of the internet suggests that the parents of children withcerebral palsy do not yet have an objective aggregator of information to turn to.  Let’s consider this our attempt to provide parents in the Baltimore and Washington D.C. areas with a place to turn. Read more >

Charity Begins at Home: OriolesREACH Program Hits a Grand Slam with Us!

Posted by Brian Nash

I recently wrote a post about our local area charities and civic organizations who do so much for so many in our community. With that in mind, as I was happily reading the sports page in the warm glow of the Orioles’ 12th inning victory yesterday (5 in a row – Go O’s), I came across a piece about a new initiative for our military personnel by the Birds. While looking at the details of this worthy program, I noticed (ashamedly for the first time, I admit) a host of community programs being run by the Orioles. The team uses the name OriolesREACH for the community programs they sponsor, promote or fund. Read more >

Sneak Peak of the Week Ahead

Here’s a sampling of what’s coming next week on The Eye Opener: Views and Opinions from the Nash Community:

  • As families prepare for the upcoming holidays and summer vacation, Theresa Neumann has some important medical advice about what else needs to be included in your travel plans.
  • Legal Boot Camp: Prepare for our second class – get those pencils, pens, iPads and whatever else you need out and ready – there could be a pop quiz on next week’s primary on law.
  • What rights do babies-before-birth (fetal rights) have in our legal system? Do parents who lose a child just before birth have any rights of recovery? You’ll find out next week.
  • Home births are on the rise. Is that a good or a bad thing? Sarah Keogh weighs in on that issue in the coming edition of The Eye Opener

And….maybe even more to come…you can never tell….

Have a wonderful and safe Memorial Day Weekend. Best to All of You and Your Families and Friends from All of Us at Nash & Associates

Dealing with Cerebral Palsy: A Resource for Parents and Family

Thursday, May 26th, 2011

Today’s society has become increasingly dependent on aggregators. We use a variety of methods to assemble and sort information so that we can easily consume it.  Mint.com and Quicken help with our finances and Google Reader helps to manage our online content. A quick search of the internet suggests that the parents of children with cerebral palsy do not yet have an objective aggregator of information to turn to.  Let’s consider this our attempt to provide parents in the Baltimore and Washington D.C. areas with a place to turn.

This is Part I of a several part series.  As we continue to provide you – our readers—with information, if there is anything that would prove helpful, please do not hesitate to let us know.

Here is the roadmap for our journey:

Part I:  Introduction:  You are not alone

Part II:  Education for your child.

Part III:  Medical Information for Parents

Part IV:  Cerebral Palsy Treatments and Therapies

Part V:  Legal Rights & Help

What is Cerebral Palsy?

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KRljnQTEBMo

Cerebral Palsy is a broad term used to describe a group of chronic movement or posture disorders. “Cerebral” refers to the brain, while “Palsy” refers to a physical disorder, such as a lack of muscle control. Cerebral Palsy is not caused by problems with the muscles or nerves, but rather with the brain’s ability to adequately control the body. Cerebral Palsy can be caused by injury during birth, although sometimes it is the result of later damage to the brain. Symptoms usually appear in the first few years of life and once they appear, they generally do not worsen over time. Disorders are classified into four categories:

  • Spastic (difficult or stiff movement)
  • Ataxic (loss of depth perception and balance)
  • Athetoid/Dyskinetic (uncontrolled or involuntary movements)
  • Mixed (a mix of two or more of the above)

If you are the parent of a child with cerebral palsy the most important thing that you need to know is that you are not alone. Mike Sanders recently addressed this issue in his blog entitled The Daily Struggle of Raising a Disable Child. In addition to the private resources available to you (these resources will be covered in the upcoming segments), there are significant government resources available to Maryland area parents.  Here is a quick breakdown, courtesy of cerebralpalsy.org (please feel free to bookmark this page for easy access to these valuable contacts:

GOVERNOR’S OFFICE FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES

Beatrice Rodgers, Director

Governor’s Office for Individuals with Disabilities
One Market Center, Box 10
300 West Lexington Street
Baltimore, MD 21201-3435
(410) 333-3098 (V/TTY)
E-mail: oid@clark.nett

Department of Education, Division of Special Education
Early Intervention Services
200 West Baltimore Street
Baltimore, MD 21201-2595
(410) 767-0238
E-mail: cbaglin@msde.state.md.us

Web: www.msde.state.md.us

PROGRAMS FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH DISABILITIES:
AGES BIRTH THROUGH 3
Deborah Metzger, Program Manager
Program Development and Assistance Branch
Division of Special Education
Early Intervention Services
200 West Baltimore Street
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 767-0237; (800) 535-0182 (in MD)

PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES:
AGES 3-21
Jerry F. White, Program Manager
Department of Education
Division of Special Education
Early Intervention Services
200 West Baltimore Street
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 767-0249
E-mail: jwhite@msde.state.md.us

STATE VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AGENCY
Robert Burns, Assistant State Superintendent
Division of Rehabilitation Services
Department of Education, Maryland Rehabilitation Center
2301 Argonne Drive
Baltimore, MD 21218-1696
(410) 554-9385
E-mail: dors@state.md.us
Web: www.dors.state.md.us/

OFFICE OF STATE COORDINATOR OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
Mary Ann Marvil, Equity Specialist
Division of Career Technology and Adult Learning
200 West Baltimore Street
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 767-0536
E-mail: mmarvil@msde.state.md.us

STATE MENTAL HEALTH AGENCY
Oscar Morgan, Director
Mental Hygiene Admin.
Department of Health & Mental Hygiene
201 West Preston Street, Suite 416A
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 767-6655
E-mail: morgano@dhmh.state.md.us

STATE MENTAL HEALTH REPRESENTATIVE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTH
Albert Zachik, Assistant Director
Mental Hygiene Administration
Child & Adolescent Services
Department of Health & Mental Hygiene
201 West Preston Street
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 767-6649

STATE MENTAL RETARDATION PROGRAM
Diane Coughlin, Director
Developmental Disabilities Administration
Department of Health & Mental Hygiene
201 West Preston Street, Room 422C
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 767-5600
E-mail: coughlind@dhmh.state.md.us

STATE DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES PLANNING COUNCIL
Mindy Morrell, Executive Director
MD Developmental Disabilities Council
300 West Lexington Street, Box 10
Baltimore, MD 21201-2323
(410) 333-3688
E-mail: MDDC@erols.com

PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY AGENCY
Philip Fornaci, Executive Director
Maryland Disability Law Center
1800 N. Charles, Suite 204
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 727-6352; (800) 233-7201
E-mail: philf@MDLCBALTO.org

CLIENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM
Peggy Dew, Director
Client Assistance Program
Department of Education
Division of Rehabilitation Services
2301 Argonne Drive
Baltimore, MD 21218
(410) 554-9358; (800) 638-6243
Web: www.dors.state.md.us/cap.html

PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL HEALTH CARE NEEDS
Sandra J. Malone, Chief
Department of Health & Mental Hygiene
Children’s Medical Services Program- Unit 50
20l West Preston Street
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 225-5580; (800) 638-8864
E-mail: Malones@DHMH.state.md.us

STATE EDUCATION AGENCY RURAL REPRESENTATIVE
Jerry White, Program Manager
Program Administration & Support
Division of Special Education/Department of Education
200 West Baltimore Street, 4th floor
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 767-0249
E-mail: jwhite@msde.state.md.us

REGIONAL ADA TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE AGENCY
ADA Information Center for Mid-Atlantic Region
TransCen, Inc.
451 Hungerford Drive, Suite 607
Rockville, MD 20850
(301) 217-0124 (V/TTY); (800) 949-4232 (V/TTY)
E-mail: adainfo@transcen.org
Web: www.adainfo.org

DISABILITY ORGANIZATIONS
Attention Deficit Disorder
To identify an ADD group in your state or locality, contact either:
Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CH.A.D.D)
8181 Professional Place, Suite 201
Landover, MD 20785
(301) 306-7070
(800) 233-4050 (Voice mail to request information packet)
E-mail: national@chadd.org
Web: www.chadd.org

National Attention Deficit Disorder Association (ADDA)
P.O. Box 1303
Northbrook, IL 60065-1303
E-mail: mail@add.org
Web: www.add.org

Autism Society of America
7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 300
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 657-0881; (800) 3-AUTISM
Web: www.autism-society.org

Alicia Brain Injury
Brain Injury Association of Maryland
Kernan Hospital
2200 Kernan Drive
Baltimore, MD 21207
(410) 448-2924;
(800) 221-6443 (in MD)
Website: http://www.biamd.org
E-mail: info@biamd.org

Cerebral Palsy
Mitzi Bernard, Executive Director
United Cerebral Palsy of Southern MD
49 Old Solomons Island Rd., Suite 301
Annapolis, MD 21401
(410) 897-9545
E-mail: somducp@earthlink.net
Web: www.sitestar.com/ucp/

Lee Kingham, Executive Director
Epilepsy Association of MD
Hampton Plaza, Suite 1103
300 East Joppa Road
Towson, MD 21286
(410) 828-7700; (800) 492-2523 (in MD only)

Learning Disabilities Association of MD
76 Cranbrook Road, Suite 300
Cockeysville, MD 21030
(800) 673-6777

Linda Raines, Executive Director
Mental Health Association of Maryland
711 West 40th Street, Suite 428
Baltimore, MD 21211
(410) 235-1178

NAMI MD
711 W. 40th St., Suite 451
Baltimore, MD 21211
(410) 467-7100; (800) 467-0075
E-mail: amimd@AOL.com
Web: amimd.nami.org/amimd/

Cristine Boswell Marchand, Executive Director
The Arc of Maryland
49 Old Solomons Island Road, Suite 205
Annapolis, MD 21401
(410) 571-9320; (410) 974-6139 (In Balt.)
E-mail: cmarchand@thearcmd.org

Speech and Hearing
Rosalie Nabors, President
MD Speech-Language-Hearing Association
P.O. Box 31
Manchester, MD 21102
(800) 622-6742

Division of Special Education, Early Intervention Services
Department of Education
200 West Baltimore Street, 4th floor
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 767-0652; (800) 535-0182 (in MD only)

Parents of children in Washington D.C., part II of this series will provide you with a comprehensive list of the government-based agencies available to support your needs.   Additionally, we will take a look at the challenges faced by parents that are looking for educational resources–of all varieties– for their children.

For a primer for part II of this series, see our prior piece entitled IEP’s: Stand Up for Your Child’s rights – Be Their Best Advocate.

 

Related Posts:

CDC Features – Date Show 1 in 303 Children Have Cerebral Palsy

 

Image from hear-it.org