Archive for the ‘Drug Companies’ Category

Children’s Medications: Coming Changes and Tips to Avoid Overdose

Tuesday, May 24th, 2011

We all know that a little over-the-counter (OTC) pain medication can be just what the doctor ordered for minor aches, pains or to help combat the symptoms of a nasty flu. Most adults, however, also realize that medications can be dangerous. No, I am not talking about the blast from the past news stories about medications that have been tampered with (…though it is weird that the Unabomber, Ted Kaczynski, is back in the news as one possible suspect in the Tylenol poisonings that killed people in the Chicago area in 1982). My focus today is on the danger involved with overdoses of commonly used pain medication. In particular, the risk of accidentally overdosing children on OTC pain relievers such as Tylenol.

Image from www.tylenol.com

There has been quite a bit of focus recently on the possible changes to Tylenol and other acetaminophen containing drugs for children. These are not formula changes and they have nothing to do with the myriad of Tylenol recalls over the past couple of years. Currently, the basic concern is that overdoses of this common medication accounts for a fairly sizeable number of poisoning cases, which can be very serious since overdose can cause liver damage to children. An AP article reports that:

Dosing errors with children’s acetaminophen products accounted for 2.8 percent, or 7,500, of the 270,165 emergencies reported to poison centers last year, according to the American Association of Poison Control Centers.

Overdoses can be caused by parents not reading the label, misinterpreting the dosing instructions or using a spoon or other container instead of the cup included with the product.

These overdose situations most often occur in children under 2 years old.

Chart provided on www.tylenol.com

When I read this, I was not surprised. Currently acetaminophen for children, Tylenol and other brands, come in two different concentrations.  Most commonly one is labeled “Children’s” and the other “Infant’s.” Each of these medications include on the outside packaging a confusing little matrix that details the correct dosage for a child of a particular age or weight range. The correct dosing for your child’s age and weight may not be the same if you have a child that is particularly large or small for their age. Additionally, if you have both children’s and infant’s acetaminophen products in your home, you must be careful to provide the correct dosing for the correct concentration. This does not even get into the differences in dosing between the liquid medicine and the tablets. Finally, the box does not provide dosing information for children less than two years of age. The dosing instruction for children under 24 months is “ask your doctor.” So, how many of you are going to make that phone call?

The harsh realities of parenting and sick kids

My children are both young; the youngest is now a little past her second birthday. In the last few years, we have had both infant and children medication in the house, liquid and tablets, and I have been very careful to make sure to double-check myself if I ever have to medicate either child to make sure that I am reading the correct dosing matrix for the correct concentration and for the correct child. More often than not, I have found that children need medication when their parents are tired. As parents know – children frequently get sick in the middle of the night and when children in the house are sick nobody in the household sleeps well. I always try to take this into account to avoid dosing errors. However, this can be confusing particularly when children are little.

When my children were very little, I used to ask the doctor at each appointment what would be the correct Tylenol dose for their current weight. I did not foresee having to use that information, but I wanted to make sure that I knew the correct amount in case I was caught with a sick child in the middle of the night. If it had been a while since my child was weighed, I would sometimes have to call for dosing information. Additionally, I found that it was nearly impossible to dose a child properly using the little cups included with the medication. However, the medicine packaging clearly states that you are only to dose using the enclosed cup. I found that my ability to dose the correct amount of medication was much improved when I used a syringe style dropper.

The FDA steps in – finally!

Well, apparently, I have not been alone in my concerns. The FDA panel that met last week, has made some recommendations that may improve some of these problems in the future and lessen the chances that children will receive too much medication. According to the AP article, the following recommendations have been voted on and will be recommended to the FDA:

  • Dosing instructions should be added for children younger than 2 years old
  • Dosing instructions should be provided based on a child’s weight (rather than the focus being on a child’s age)
  • Limiting cup measurements to milliliters  (rather than both teaspoons and milliliters…one of many things that make the current measurement cups confusing)
  • Mandating a single dosage for children’s solid acetaminophen tablets

Infant Tylenol (and other acetaminophen products) a thing of the past

Relatedly, the article mentioned that the Consumer Healthcare Products Association, which includes the makers of Tylenol and many other acetaminophen producers, agreed to voluntarily stop producing infant drops. This decision means that a day may be coming soon when there would only be one concentration available of children’s acetaminophen.

Some tips and tricks to avoid overdosing your child

If infant acetaminophen is eliminated and children’s acetaminophen is sold with the changed dosing instructions, I think that parents and other caregivers will find it much easier to provide children with the correct amount of medication. However, I would still recommend taking the following steps to protect your children:

  • Keep all medications, including children’s acetaminophen, in a locked closet or other locked secure location away from children.
  • Do not forget to re-secure medication, even when children are sick, so that children are not accidentally able to overdose (when using medicine frequently the temptation to leave it accessible should not overcome the safety element of keeping it away from little hands).
  • Keep a list of the current weight of each child in the house available with the medications so that a caregiver (or tired parent) knows the weight of each child to be able to refer to the dosing chart when needed.
  • Use a clearly marked cup or syringe that is specifically for medicine to dose your child – do not use a household spoon or other imprecise measuring tool.
  • If in doubt on dosing, call the pediatrician to be sure – do not guess!
  • When multiple people will be caring for a sick child (or if you are tired), make sure that you note down the time of each dose of medication to ensure proper timing between doses to avoid accidental overdose.
  • Read the ingredients on any medication carefully to ensure that you do not give your child multiple medications containing the same ingredient – acetaminophen is sometimes added to other medications in combination drugs.

The best advice

Obviously, since I am not a doctor, you should check with your pediatrician if you have any questions about what the correct method is for providing medication to your child, but these tips will hopefully help eliminate some of the more common medication errors in your home.

Your take?

Do you have other tips to share? What about the recommended changes, do you think that additional changes are needed? Do you use fever-reducing medications in your child if your child is not displaying other symptoms, or do you allow the fever to do its work its way out?

Makena: Drug to fight prematurity leads to major firestorm.

Thursday, April 7th, 2011

Last week, I started following a still emerging story about a drug that I had never heard of before called Makena. The medication is a synthetic form of progesterone that is used for women who have a high risk of prematurely delivering a baby based on having had a premature delivery in the past. The drug must be injected by these women weekly for 18-20 weeks of their pregnancy.

According to the Baltimore Sun, the controversy surrounding this drug began when the “…K-V Pharmaceutical Co. boosted the total cost of the drug during a pregnancy from about $400 to $30,000, igniting a firestorm of objections.” This was possible because originally the medication was created by a compounding pharmacy mixing it together for patient use. Then in February, the FDA granted K-V Pharmaceutical Co. the exclusive rights to manufacture the medication for seven years.

If raising the cost of the medication 75 times its original cost (from $10-20/dose to $1,500/dose) were not enough, the Baltimore Sun reports that the company then went on to “sen[d] letters to pharmacies threatening that the FDA would punish them if they compounded their own versions of the drug.”  However, the FDA, amid a loud outcry of complaints, has “…declared it would do no such thing.  In its statement, the FDA noted that the drug was important and K-V ‘received considerable assistance from the federal government in connection with the development of Makena by relying on research funded by the National Institutes of Health to demonstrate the drug’s effectiveness.’”

What has been so interesting are the implications of this story and the reactions to it. Clearly, the original decision by the pharmaceutical company to raise the cost of the drug 75 times the old cost is an attempt to make money from their exclusive rights. I can hardly imagine that there is any reason other than profit creation for this move given that they did not have costs associated with research and development or any other clearly identifiable costs. So, aside from my initial reaction of disgust that this might make it harder for women who need this medication to protect their children, I also thought about the bigger implications.

First of all, the cost issue is not so simple as it first appears.  As another article from the Baltimore Sun mentioned, “[t]he burden for many will fall on insurance companies, which may have to raise rates. The increase will also affect already strapped Medicaid programs.” The increased costs of drugs impact many Americans directly – those without insurance or those for whom even co-pays are a major budgetary struggle. However, the costs here also reach all of us. If the costs associated with the company’s increased profit are borne by the insurance companies and Medicaid, it also means that the costs are going to be felt by all of us who pay for health insurance or whose companies pay for health insurance and yes, by all of us, who pay taxes.

Secondly, for those women who do not realize that they could still go to a compounding pharmacy for this prescription and for whom it is not covered by insurance, the increased cost may mean that some woman will go without these injections. The Baltimore Sun article reports that:

About 500,000 U.S. infants are born prematurely each year. The March of Dimes estimates that about 10,000 of those premature births could be prevented if eligible women received Makena.

The implications here deal with both the health and safety of the unborn child who is now at risk of premature birth. But, unfortunately, they also have an associated monetary cost. The cost of a baby being born prematurely is also going to weigh on the insurance companies and is, therefore, going to be shared by all in the form of potentially increased premiums.

Given the intense criticism in the news, K-V Pharmaceutical Company moderately changed course in the last few days, according to Medical News Today and said they would bring the cost of Makena down to $690 per dose from the originally announced price of $1,500 per dose. While this is lower, this is hardly a significant adjustment given that the compounded version costs between $10-20 per dose. The March of Dimes, which originally backed FDA approval of the drug and was allowing the pharmaceutical company’s use of its name and logo, is apparently embarrassed by KV Pharmaceutical’s decisions. According to an article on the nonprofitquarterly.org, “…the March of Dimes is backing out of a sponsorship deal with the [pharmaceutical] company that sells [Makena]. Last Friday, the nation’s leading nonprofit focused on the health of pregnant women and babies said it would no longer allow St. Louis-based, KV Pharmaceutical Co. to use its name or logo in any of the drug company’s promotions.”

The response from the March of Dimes is not KV Pharmaceutical Co.’s only trouble as the Wall Street Journal is reporting that after the FDA announcement that it will not take action against pharmacies that compound the drug, and the company subsequently announced that it would cut the cost, the company’s shares fell 5.2%.  Reuter’s is reporting that this represents a drop of more than 20 percent.  Congress is also in an uproar about this issue.  The Reuter’s article says that elected officials are creating pressure for more to do be done on this issue.

What do you think should be done about KV Pharmaceutical Co.? Are they really any different from any of the other pharmaceutical companies? Is it relevant to consider that this is a so-called orphan drug and that the company has exclusive rights because of this? Do you think that allowing compounding pharmacies to create the drug for woman separate from the FDA approved drug is a sufficient solution? What about the bigger question of companies creating inflated prices for their products and having insurance (and all of us) foot the bill?