Archive for the ‘Obstetrical Complications’ Category

Simulation Labs: Helping Teach Nurses in Baltimore

Tuesday, September 27th, 2011

From nursing.jhu.edu

Any one who has ever had a hospital stay or knows a loved one or friend who has been in the hospital knows that the nurses play a vital role in caring for patients. Nurses do many of the day-to-day activities of caring for patients in hospitals and clinics. They are also often the first ones at the bedside if a problem arises – so -isn’t it essential that nurses be well trained in all forms of emergency procedures? Even when doctors are present, nurses often play vital roles in assisting the doctors in providing life-saving care to patients.

Law and Medicine Intersect Once Again

I have recently been working on a case in which both doctors and nurses were present during an in-hospital delivery that ended with a significant injury to the child. During the delivery, a problem was encountered that has a low incidence rate during deliveries.  In considering this problem, I wondered just how frequently doctors and nurses are able to practice the skills they would need to successfully and calmly deliver a baby in a situation like this.  Faced with this “emergency” situation, how many of the doctors and nurses in the room had not experienced this problem before? For those who had –  just how much “experience” did they bring to the problem they were facing?

Simulations Rooms and Simulation Patients Provide Training Opportunities

Thankfully, technology is making it more feasible for training healthcare providers to practice handling a myriad of clinical situations during their education process that they might otherwise not experience frequently enough for their skills to develop in real world settings. In Baltimore, the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing (JHUSON) has simulation rooms in which nursing students are able to practice a variety of procedures and techniques using simulation patients in rooms that are designed to replicate the real patient areas of the hospital. There is also a whole family of simulators to help. This “sim fam” is not like the lifeless plastic dummies you might be imagining. They are a variety of different types of “…life-like practice manikins, including Sim Man, Vital Sim Man, Noelle with newborn, and Sim Baby [that] give nursing students the hands-on experience without the anxiety of working with actual human beings.”

Harvey the Cardiac Sim, SimNewB and Sim Man 3G  - All New Additions to the “Sim Fam”

From nursing.jhu.edu

Just this year, in March, JHUSON added Harvey to its collection of simulators.  While Harvey is new to JHUSON, he is not exactly new technology:

For almost 40 years Harvey, developed in cooperation between Laerdal Medical Corporation and Miami University Miller School of Medicine, has been a proven simulation system teaching bedside cardiac assessment skills that transfer to real patients, and remains the longest continuous university-based simulation project in medical education.

Harvey’s job is to be able to simulate “nearly any cardiac disease at the touch of a button: varying blood pressure, pulses, heart sounds, and murmurs. The software installed in the simulator allows users to track history, bedside findings, lab data, medical and surgical treatment.”  He joins a collection of other sim patients that enable healthcare providers to learn and practice critical life-saving measures such as CPR, defibrillation, intubation and yes – even the proper checking of vital signs. JHSON has adult, child and baby versions of these simulators. Some of them can even “talk” to the practicing nurses. (I wonder if they are programmed to be cooperative and informative or hostile and combative – hmmm.)

New Family Members Arrived this Past August

Even newer, in August, JHUSON added SimNewB and Sim Man 3G to the family. The SimNewB is:

…a 7 pound, 21 inch female baby, with realistic newborn traits. Students will be able to simulate a wide variety of patient conditions with her, including life-threatening ones. The department’s current Sim baby is the size of a 6 month old and is not as conducive to delivery room procedures.

She is also interactive, though she is not wireless like the Sim Man 3G. Some of the new Sim Man’s traits include “…breath sounds both anteriorly and posteriorly, … pupil reactions, [and] skin temperature changes.”

What about Obstetrics Cases?

So, what about the case I was mentioning that involved obstetrical care? Well, JHUSON also has a pregnant simulator, which is can be used to practice a whole host of obstetrically related procedures. These include “Leopold maneuvers, normal vaginal and instrumented delivery, breech delivery, C-section, and postpartum hemorrhaging, among other functions.” The JHUSON sim family also has the new Sim newborn – SimNewB.

The “Jury” Is Still “Out”

Can there be any doubt that additional hands-on practice opportunities with simulators is a good idea for situations that may not come up very often in everyday practice? Won’t it help healthcare practitioners gain skills and keep those skills up-to-date? Any opinion I might have on these issues is not based on evidence….yet. Luckily, JHSON is “…among 10 nursing schools nationwide collaborating on a landmark study to find out just how well patient simulators—high-tech manikins that respond to a nurse’s care—help prepare the nurses of tomorrow.”  I – for one – will certainly be interested in the outcome of that study.

What about you? Do you think that it makes sense for nurses in training to make use of simulation rooms and simulated patients? Would it be better for them to spend more time in real world situations doing real patient care under the supervision of experienced practitioners? What about techniques that might not come up very often?

If any of the readers of this post have used these sim patients in your training and can give us firsthand information as to how, if at all, it carried-over to make you more “experienced and skilled” when facing similar clinical situations with real patients, your comments would be most welcomed as well.

Week in Review: (May 22 – 28, 2011) The Eye Opener Health, Law and Medicine Blog

Saturday, May 28th, 2011

From the Editor – Brian Nash

Last week’s posts by our blawgers were packed with information about a variety of topics ranging from the medicine you need to know about concussions, living with cancer, cerebral palsy resources and the potential risks of overdosing your child with medications.

On the legal front, we began a series I’m personally excited about. We call it Legal Boot Camp. It will be a series for those in our practice jurisdictions of Maryland and Washington, D.C. Our teacher’s face is on – lesson plans in place. We hope you learn some things about the laws that can affect your lives in the areas of personal injury – particularly medical malpractice law.  Our first class took place with a piece by Sarah Keogh that examines the law in Maryland on the right to claim loss/diminished earning capacity. If you’re wondering if you can have such a claim even if you weren’t working when you were injured, Sarah has some information for you. Check it out. Turn in your class card and have some fun.

We wrapped up the week with a piece by yours truly on a wonderful community outreach program by our local baseball heroes, the Baltimore Orioles. Aptly named – OriolesREACH, this initiative has a number of wonderful events, charities and missions that are worth knowing about. One in particular, Shannon’s Fund, is a great program to help those in need while dealing with the financial burdens while dealing with cancer. It is run by the University of Maryland Medical Center. Read about our challenge to our brethren before the bar in the Greater Baltimore Area.

Without further ado, here are the blogs we posted this past week …. and a sneak peak of the week ahead.

Concussions: The Message of Brian Roberts’ Injury Should Not Go Unheeded

Posted by Brian Nash

Anyone who follows sports is well aware that finally the old school mentality of “gut it out and get back in there” following blows to the head are coming (not too soon) to an end. Committees have been formed, articles written and the national spotlight of the media have finally focused on this issue. Those recommendations, debates and guidelines are beyond the scope of this post. Nevertheless, those involved in sports…Read more >

Children’s Medications: Coming Changes and Tips to Avoid Overdose

Posted by Sarah Keogh

My children are both young; the youngest is now a little past her second birthday. In the last few years, we have had both infant and children medication in the house, liquid and tablets, and I have been very careful to make sure to double-check myself if I ever have to medicate either child to make sure that I am reading the correct dosing matrix for the correct concentration and for the correct child. More often than not, I have found that children need medication when their parents are tired. As parents know – children frequently…Read more >

 

Living With Cancer: What to Expect After the Diagnosis

Posted by Jon Stefanuca

About a million and a half people will be diagnosed with cancer in the U.S. this year. The devastating truth about cancer is that about one-third of these people will die from cancer at some point. For most, the diagnosis is unexpected and completely overwhelming.The cancer does not just affect how one feels, it undermines all sense of security and stability. It changes lifestyles and redefines relationships. So often the emotional trauma is equally shared among family members and loved ones. Read more >

New Blog Series: Legal Boot Camp

Posted by Brian Nash

I’m really pleased to announce a new series we’re starting today. If you’re a reader of our blog, you know that we post numerous times a week on health, safety, medicine and related law topics. That’s what we do in our firm – we represent people who are injured by the negligence of health care providers and those who suffer catastrophic injuries in non-medical settings as well. So, sharing what we believe is some good information about medical, health and safety issues is our mission. We strongly believe that our social networking should be about giving good information, engaging in dialogue about relevant issues – just plain good, old sharing. Read more >

Legal Boot Camp (First Class): The Story of Pam – Maryland’s Law on Loss of Earning Capacity

Posted by Sarah Keogh

A 41-year-old woman, Pam, who was laid off from her job as a swimming instructor and swim coach in December of 2009, has been struggling to find a new position for the last few years. Even though Pam had been working as a swimming instructor full-time for the past 18 years, she felt that she needed to jump into a new career while waiting to find a new position as a swimming instructor and coach. Starting in October of 2010, her father died leaving her a rundown home that he had recently purchased with the intent of renovating it. Pam felt that she could put her physical fitness and knowledge of home aesthetics to work, not to mention the ideas she picked up watching renovations shows while unemployed, by renovating the home her father left… Read more >

Dealing with Cerebral Palsy: A Resource for Parents and Family

Posted by Jason Penn

Today’s society has become increasingly dependent on aggregators. We use a variety of methods to assemble and sort information so that we can easily consume it.  Mint.com and Quicken help with our finances and Google Reader helps to manage our online content. A quick search of the internet suggests that the parents of children withcerebral palsy do not yet have an objective aggregator of information to turn to.  Let’s consider this our attempt to provide parents in the Baltimore and Washington D.C. areas with a place to turn. Read more >

Charity Begins at Home: OriolesREACH Program Hits a Grand Slam with Us!

Posted by Brian Nash

I recently wrote a post about our local area charities and civic organizations who do so much for so many in our community. With that in mind, as I was happily reading the sports page in the warm glow of the Orioles’ 12th inning victory yesterday (5 in a row – Go O’s), I came across a piece about a new initiative for our military personnel by the Birds. While looking at the details of this worthy program, I noticed (ashamedly for the first time, I admit) a host of community programs being run by the Orioles. The team uses the name OriolesREACH for the community programs they sponsor, promote or fund. Read more >

Sneak Peak of the Week Ahead

Here’s a sampling of what’s coming next week on The Eye Opener: Views and Opinions from the Nash Community:

  • As families prepare for the upcoming holidays and summer vacation, Theresa Neumann has some important medical advice about what else needs to be included in your travel plans.
  • Legal Boot Camp: Prepare for our second class – get those pencils, pens, iPads and whatever else you need out and ready – there could be a pop quiz on next week’s primary on law.
  • What rights do babies-before-birth (fetal rights) have in our legal system? Do parents who lose a child just before birth have any rights of recovery? You’ll find out next week.
  • Home births are on the rise. Is that a good or a bad thing? Sarah Keogh weighs in on that issue in the coming edition of The Eye Opener

And….maybe even more to come…you can never tell….

Have a wonderful and safe Memorial Day Weekend. Best to All of You and Your Families and Friends from All of Us at Nash & Associates

Laughing Gas Making Its Way Back Into The Labor And Deliver Department

Thursday, April 21st, 2011

According to a recent article published by MSNBC, laughing gas or nitrous oxide is making its way back into labor and delivery units in American hospitals. Although laughing gas has long been used as a pain relief in various countries, including Canada and the U.K., it has lost its popularity in the U.S. Well, maybe not for much longer.

It appears that a number of hospitals are now considering making laughing gas available as a pain relief measure for women in labor. A hospital in San Francisco and another in Seattle have been using laughing gas in their labor and delivery units for a while. Hospitals like Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center plan to offer laughing gas to laboring mothers in the immediate future. Dartmouth-Hitchcock’s plan is currently being reviewed by the federal government, and arrangements are presently being made for the procurement of delivery equipment for laughing gas. Vanderbilt University Medical Center may begin offering laughing gas as well later this year.

History

Laughing gas is not a new pain relief method. Its use had become very common in hospitals when Joseph Thomas Clover invented the gas-ether inhaler in 1876. Particularly, its use in the labor and delivery setting had been very common before the introduction of epidural and spinal anesthesia. Because laughing gas is unable to eliminate pain to the same degree as epidural or spinal anesthesia, it simply could not compete with the more sophisticated pain relief alternatives, which entered the marker in the 30s and 40s.

What is laughing gas?

Nitrous oxide, commonly known as laughing gas or sweet air, is a chemical compound with the formula N2O. It is an oxide of nitrogen. At room temperature, it is a colorless non-flammable gas, with a slightly sweet odor and taste. It is used in surgery and dentistry for its anesthetic and analgesic effects. It is known as “laughing gas” due to the euphoric effects of inhaling it, a property that has led to its recreational use as a dissociative anesthetic.

Laughing gas as an important pain relief alternative

Although laughing gas can only take the edge off pain, it just might be an important alternative to other more conventional pain relief methods. The patient does not have to rely on an anesthesiologist to administer the gas. The patient can herself choose how much gas to administer at any time. The effects of the gas are not long-lasting. Therefore, the patient does not have to recover in a post anesthesia care unit. Importantly, there is no associated loss of sensation and motor function during the delivery process. As such, the gas does not interfere with the woman’s ability to breath and push during labor. Laughing gas is also not known to have any adverse effects on the baby in utero.

The administration of laughing gas does not require any invasive medical procedures. By contrast, consider epidural anesthesia: An epidural requires that an epidural catheter be threaded into the epidural space, which is only about 2 mm wide. Any mistake and the consequences can be catastrophic. Epidurals have been known to cause spinal cord injury secondary t0 toxicity, spinal cord infarcts, severe hypotension, paraplegia, epidural bleeding, and even death. None of these complications are associated with the use of laughing gas.

: httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1TO4sOgiIeU]

According to Suzanne Serat, a nurse midwife at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center:

We have a number of people who don’t want to feel the pain of labor, and nitrous oxide would not be a good option for them. They really need an epidural, and that’s perfect for them. […] Then we have a number of people who are going to wait and see what happens, and when they’re in labor, decide they’d like something and then the only option for them is an epidural but they don’t need something that strong. So they would choose to use something in the middle, but we just don’t have anything in the middle.

Nitrous oxide may just prove to be that middle option for many women who prefer to give birth without the use of powerful and potentially dangerous analgesic/anesthetic agents. If you are an expectant mother, ask your obstetrician if nitrous oxide is a pain relief option that may be available to you during labor.

Image from cartoonstock.com

For more information about epidural anesthesia and epidural complications, you may want to read these posts too:

Having an epidural when you deliver your baby? 3 Questions to ask the doctor!

5 Questions to Ask Your Obstetrician Before You Go to the Hospital

Epidural Analgesia – What Should an Expectant Mother Consider? What are the risks?

Week in Review: If you missed this past week’s blogs – catch up!

Sunday, April 10th, 2011

This past week was a busy one for our bloggers. It was also a very busy week in our law practice. Over the last two months, we have also had two new lawyers join us – Sarah Keogh and Jason Penn. Sarah has contributed a number of posts already. Jason , who just started this past Monday, will soon be sharing his contributions, thoughts and comments with you as well. We’re very happy to have both of them. I’m sure you join us in wishing them a very warm welcome.

Last week our writers covered a number of topics related to health, medicine, child safety, medical technology and patient safety. We started the week off with a piece by Brian Nash on some key facts women need to be aware of when having an epidural for labor, delivery and post-partum pain relief.

Epidurals

There can be no doubt that thousands of epidurals are administered to women every day throughout this country. This form of analgesia (pain relief) has become probably the most popular form of anesthetic management and apparently is generally believed to be essentially risk free. As this week’s piece, Having an epidural when you have your baby? 3 questions to ask the doctor, reports, some literature gives the figure of complications from epidurals as high as 23% - ranging in severity from minor inconveniences, to life-long major disabilities and even death.

This particular piece was written as a result of several cases in which we have been involved when women, who had undergone an epidural, became essentially paralyzed from the waist down. We raise some questions for women to ask the doctor and suggest they just might want to ask those questions before they find themselves in the process of labor or when they are going through the recovery phase of having given birth to their baby. We believe it’s an important piece for women – and frankly for all – to read so that they have a much better idea of what they should expect with an epidural and what the risks and benefits are of this wonderful yet potentially life-altering anesthetic technique.

Shaken-Baby-Syndrome

On Wednesday, Jon Stefanuca again brought to the public’s attention a problem that is probably as old as childbirth. Everyone who has had the experience of taking care of a child – particularly a baby – knows that along with the joy of parenting comes the physical and emotional toll on parents and care-givers. The human condition makes us all susceptible to being less than completely tolerant, forgiving and gentle with little ones when we are under stress, frustrated or just plain exhausted. The response to the persistent crying can simply not be “a good shake.”

Medicine and science (and unfortunately the courtroom) have given a name to a syndrome of injury babies can suffer when that “just a good shake” approach is used. While a parent or care-giver may think it unimaginable to strike a child, they may not realize just now much harm they can do with “just a good shake.” Jon brings this information and some expert tips and tricks on how to deal with these difficult times parents and care-givers face in their everyday lives in his piece Shaken Baby Syndrome – What we all should know to prevent child abuse.

Makena: New Anti-Prematurity Drug

Thursday, Sarah Keogh reported on a relatively new drug called Makena, which has been found to help pregnant women, who have previously had a premature infant. I say “relatively” since according to Sarah’s piece, a compounding pharmacy could and was making this medication prior to the FDA giving K-V Pharmaceutical Company the exclusive rights to manufacture this drug for a period of 7 years.

Read Sarah’s piece, Makena: Drug to fight prematurity leads to major firestorm, and see what the controversy is all about. How could people possible be upset with a drug that can fight premature birth? Prematurity is one of the major causes of significant childbirth injuries such as cerebral palsy. Sarah’s blog makes it all too clear why people are upset and why the March of Dimes withdrew its sponsorship for Makena.

Medical Technology and Patient Safety

The week ended with Part II of my series on medical technology and whether all the new toys, bells and whistles of our modern healthcare system are truly advancing safe, efficient and effective delivery of healthcare. The week’s piece focuses on perhaps one of the largest advances in the healthcare industry – electronic medical records (EMR).

The blog, Medical Technology and Patient Safety – Part II – EMR’s (electronic medical records), brings a lawyer’s perspective to this topic. Much has already been written – and frankly will continue to be written – about EMR’s by the medical profession. Controversy has filed the pages of journals and at times probably slowed traffic on the internet (okay – maybe that’s a bit of an exaggeration) since this new marvelous technological advance was rolled-out in our medical institutions.  Those writing and fighting about it have been the end-users themselves – the medical professionals, who have to deal with the issues and flaws that have surfaced with this wonderful new technology. I thought it was about time to tell you how this plays out by another end-user – the lawyer who now deals with EMR’s. This piece is also intended as the foundation for what we as lawyer have seen play-out in terms of patient safety and health as a result of EMR implementation.

Sneak Peak of the Week Ahead

I anticipate that next week we’ll be seeing Jason Penn with his first blog on a recent report about numerous safety violations by hospitals in our practice jurisdictions – Maryland and Washington, D.C. Mike Sanders will be bringing to our readers aN old but back-in-the-news report on super infections, which still seem to be – unfortunately – thriving in our nation’s hospitals. We’ll start off this coming week with a piece by Theresa Neumann, our highly acclaimed in-house physician’s assistant expert, on spinal stroke. We all know about strokes that can damage the brain. Theresa will be sharing her insights on an equally devastating stroke of the spinal cord. I also suspect – shhh – that we’ll be reading more from Sarah Keogh this coming week. If the practice of law doesn’t get too much in the way, I am also hoping to share with you some real life examples – from a lawyer’s perspective – of just how EMR’s may not be advancing the causes of patient safety and health.

As with all our blogs, we sincerely invite you to not only read our thoughts and comments but to also share yours with us and our readers. Our latest stats show that around 10,000 pages are viewed by our readers and visitors every month! We sincerely thank all of you, who have taken the time out of your busy lives to read our offerings in The Eye Opener – Views and Opinions from the Nash Community. We invite you to share our posts with your friends and colleagues. Don’t forget to sign-up for easy delivery to your email inbox. Last – but certainly not least – come join our social media communities on Facebook and Twitter.

Nationwide Push to Curb Elective Early Deliveries

Wednesday, March 16th, 2011

Image by SoulPrintsPhotography

I recently overheard a mother talking about her child’s upcoming birth.  She was pregnant with her fourth child and was a few days away from her due date.  Another mother was asking her about whether she was concerned about when she would go into labor.  The pregnant mother explained that she was scheduled to have a planned caesarean section, since for medical reasons her prior three children had already been born via caesarean section.  What was interesting and surprising about this conversation was that the mother went on to explain that she was scheduled to give birth to the baby a week later, four days after her due date.

The mother clearly stated that she specifically requested a delivery date after her due date.  I was surprised and impressed by this mother’s decision and the explanation that she gave to the other mother about her choice.  She said that her first child was born by unscheduled caesarean section following an attempted induction two weeks after her due date.  She then had each of her subsequent children by planned caesareans – the next on the due date, the third a few days after the due date and this one planned for 4 days after the due date.  She explained that she liked to wait as long as possible before having the caesarean sections for each of her children.  I don’t know if this mom was up to date on the recent research in this area or if she had other reasons that she chose to delay delivery.  However, her choices seem very sound based on current research that shows that too many moms are having elective deliveries before their due dates.  These deliveries before a baby is full term can increase the risk of complications to mother and baby and lead to longer hospital stays.

A recent article on a Wall Street Journal Health Blog discusses the current nationwide push to inform mothers about the risks of elective delivery before 39 weeks of gestation.  Another Wall Street Journal article highlights what a large number of births this might impact as “’early term’ elective inductions…[now] account for about a quarter of births, up from less than 10% in 1990.”  The number of elective deliveries is large and so are the complications:

Now, a growing body of medical evidence indicates that gestation even a few days short of a full 39 weeks can lead to short- and long-term health risks. Public health officials, safety advocates, private insurers and employer groups are stepping up pressure to sharply reduce early term deliveries. The practice drives up costs of neonatal intensive care and leads to a higher rate of caesarean sections. C-sections are more expensive than natural deliveries and result in longer hospital stays and more risks for the mother, including infection. A study last year estimated that reducing early term births to 1.7% could save close to $1 billion annually.

The current research, including a study published in the Journal of Reproductive Medicine, is influencing a campaign to stop doctors and hospitals from allowing elective deliveries before 39 weeks to better protect mothers and babies, as well as to cut unnecessary costs.

What do you think?  I can certainly sympathize with mothers who are uncomfortable at the end of a pregnancy and are ready for delivery.  However, I cannot imagine that many mothers, faced with the information about risks to themselves and their babies, would not be willing to stay pregnant for another week or two.  I wonder if a clear and widespread public education campaign targeted at mothers would not dramatically decrease the number of elective early deliveries?

 

IEP’s: Stand Up for Your Child’s Rights – Be Their Best Advocate

Monday, March 14th, 2011

IEP File Folder from KnowledgePoints.com

Recently I wrote a blog about the general difficulties facing parents who are raising a disabled child. This week I want to address one of those specific guidelines – ensuring a quality and appropriate education for your child. For many children with disabilities, they cannot meet the traditional school criteria because of either mental, physical or other special needs. For such children, an Individualized Education Program, or IEP, is a crucial step. What is an IEP? As the name implies, it is a written education plan that is specifically tailored to your individual child rather than a general plan used for all children. Keep in mind that an IEP is not something that your disabled child may be entitled to. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) requires that IEP’s be developed for all students with disabilities.

Who creates an IEP? For every child, there is an IEP team which generally consists of the following people – the parents, the child’s teacher, the child’s special education provider, a public agency representative and perhaps other providers such as physical therapists. Depending on the age of the child and the specific disability, the child may also be part of the team. I want to emphasize that while the IEP team is filled with so-called experts in education and disability, the most important person on the team is the parent. There are two key points to keep in mind:  1) you, as the parent, are the best advocate for your child; and 2) never be afraid to stand up to the experts.

On the first point, I encourage you to read as much as possible and become informed on the subject, e.g., what new laws are coming out, what new technologies may be available. Only that way can you truly become an advocate for your child. There are a number of excellent sites on the Internet that give a wealth of information (see links below).

Parents of disabled children tell me that they have learned the hard way that there is only one person who truly cares what happens to their child – and that is the parent (or parents as the case may be). It is easy to go into an IEP meeting thinking that the administrators and teachers have your child’s best interest at heart. That’s not necessarily the case. While these people may be caring and decent people, they have other interests to consider – budgets, time constraints, other students, etc. You are the only one who is truly devoted to getting what is best for your child. Also, you are the one who knows your child best.  Just like when you go into a pediatrician’s office and describe your child’s symptoms and behavior, the same is true when attending an IEP meeting. You have interacted with your child more than anyone else. You see changes, skills, abilities (and disabilities) more than the folks who only see your child at school.  Share your knowledge and make sure the IEP team gets the benefit of your expertise as a parent.

On the second point, it can be difficult as a layperson to question those whom we see as experts. We have all been trained to defer to those with more experience. Unfortunately, some “experts” have been trained to talk down to others. A small personal story — years ago I took my grandmother to the doctor for a small skin rash. The doctor said it was psoriasis. I asked him how he knew it was psoriasis and not eczema, a similar skin condition. I will never forget his answer. “Because,” he said, “I’m a doctor.” He may as well have said, “Shut up and don’t question my expertise.” If someone on your IEP team ever adopts such an attitude with you, stand up to that person and demand answers. It is your child whose future is at issue, not the teacher’s.

As for resources, the rise in awareness of disability and IEP’s has created an entire field of special education law. Not that you need an attorney to obtain an IEP, but you should be aware of your child’s legal rights. One excellent resource that comes highly recommended from parents is Wrightslaw.com, which contains a wealth of information on disability law and special education.

No doubt a number of you have had to deal with IEP issues for your child. What has been effective for you in terms of getting the best plan for your child? What hasn’t worked? What legal entanglements have you run into? What advise do you have so that others may benefit?

Some Source References:

For general information on IEP’s (and one with a special focus on Maryland), I would recommend the following sites:

Maryland State Department of Education

National Center for Learning Disabilities

Education.com

Schaffer v Weast (a summary of the Supreme Court’s decision on burden of proof in IEP matters)

 

 

5 Questions to Ask Your Obstetrician Before You Go to the Hospital

Wednesday, March 9th, 2011

Having our baby

Once the special moment comes for you to go to the hospital to deliver your baby, there’s so much that goes on that it just may not be the best time to remember questions you wanted to ask your obstetrician. I’ve been there four times – so, as they say, been there done that! I’ve also had a number of cases that made me stop and think – “I wonder if some of the issues that my clients encountered could have been avoided if they had asked some questions before they wound-up in labor in hospital?” As you can well imagine, that is perhaps not the best time for a Q and A session.

This past weekend, I posted somewhat of a survey on our Facebook Page and Twitter asking our friends, fans and followers what questions they wished they had asked their obstetricians before they arrived at the hospital. I also have a number of moms, who work in our law office; so I put the question to them as well. The responses received provided some interesting food for thought, which I thought I might share with those about to have their baby.

Who will be delivering my baby?

This was one of the most frequent questions making the list. A number of women complained that they wish they had known that their primary obstetrician was not going to be the delivering doctor. Turns out that physician was being covered the day/night these moms delivered. While they may have met all the members of the practice (if it was a group practice), they were not particularly happy when their primary obstetrician wasn’t there for the delivery. The problem is compounded when their primary obstetrician was off and being covered by someone they had never met before. Suggestion: find out as best you can what the chances are that there will be coverage by someone you’ve never met before you arrive at the hospital. You may want to make an appointment to meet that potential covering physician if this is a concern.

When will I see my obstetrician at the hospital?

One of the cases we are handling somewhat arose from a situation that raises this as an issue. You get to the hospital, you’re admitted, you’re placed in bed, monitor attached – you’re good to go. But – where’s your doctor? Does he/she even know you’re there? When is your obstetrician coming to see you? Several of the women who responded said this was a real concern and wished they had discussed this with their doctor before they sat in bed waiting and waiting for their doctor to arrive. They also wondered – if there was no direct phone call before going to the hospital, just how could they be sure their doctor was notified that they had arrived. In one instance, one obstetrician claimed she didn’t know the patient was even in hospital for more than 4 hours! This woman had to undergo an emergency C-Section when the doctor allegedly figured out she was there. Suggestion: confirm with the hospital staff after you arrive that your doctor has been notified that you have arrived and ask when you might expect for your doctor to arrive and examine you.

Who will be doing the circumcision of my baby boy?

A number of parents indicated that while they had discussed whether their newborn son would have a circumcision, it hadn’t crossed their minds to ask – “Who will be doing the procedure?” If this is an important consideration, and you would like an answer not only as to “who” but “what experience” they have, think about covering this with your obstetrician beforehand. While some physicians are very good at performing this procedure, others are not so good. There have been a number of infant penile injuries that we have happened in the hands of – well let’s say – less than skilled physicians.

What will happen if for some reason I require general anesthesia but I’ve recently had a meal?

One of the common orders for a patient who will undergo general anesthesia is that they be NPO (nothing by mouth – liberal translation) for hours prior to surgery. While you may have planned to have an epidural or natural childbirth, some conditions involving you and/or your baby (non-reassuring fetal heart tracing, placental abruption, etc) can occur that may change the “plan” and require that you undergo a different form of anesthetic management. Suggestion: if such a situation should arise, you will be seen by an anesthesiologist first. Perhaps you will have a discussion about possible alternatives for anesthetic management, but I can virtually assure you, that will not be the best time to have a coherent, meaningful discussion. Some have suggested, based on their experience, that asking for and having a meeting with anesthesia personnel before going to the hospital for delivery is time well spent. You can usually have such appointments made through your obstetrician’s office and have a meaningful discussion of the various alternatives, risks and complications at that time.

How long will the effects of my epidural anesthetic last after delivery?

It’s been pointed out to me that while some hospitals have discontinued the practice of providing pain relief (analgesia) post-partum by use of PCA (patient controlled analgesia) pumps, some hospitals still continue that practice. Regardless of what the hospital’s practice may be, there is usually a very consistent practice/protocol for when a woman who has had an epidural should be discharged from a recovery room/area. This is when she is able to bend her knees, move her hips and flex her feet in both directions. Suggestion: ask your obstetrician what his/her practice is for providing you pain management/relief after you deliver your baby. Will you have an epidural running to provide that relief? When should you expect to get return of your ability to use and feel your legs? Don’t guess – you could suffer what is known as a prolonged block, where the anesthetic, for various reasons, is taking too long to wear-off and affecting your neurological functioning. If your obstetrician doesn’t know, then consider talking to specialist in such pain relief techniques – the anesthesiologist at the hospital where you will be delivering your baby. While you’re there, you may also want to discuss what the risks, benefits and complications of epidural, spinal and general anesthesia are so that you are aware of these issues in advance.

What suggestions do you have?

This is only a partial list of a number of suggestions made by our readers and staff. What suggestions do you have? If you have already been through childbirth, are these matters or issues you wish you had discussed before you went to the hospital? If you are about to have your first child, are these issues, concerns or questions you might share? We – and our readers – would really like to hear from you. There is no substitute for experience – or so they say.

Image by corbisimages.com


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Ovarian Cancer – Early Intervention is Key, What You Must Know…

Monday, January 3rd, 2011

According to the American Cancer Society, about 22, 000 women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer in the U.S. each year; about 14,000 of these patients will die as result of their cancer.  It is most noteworthy that the five-year survival rate is 90% when ovarian cancer is diagnosed before it has spread beyond the ovaries.  Yet, only about 20% of ovarian cancers are detected in the early stages.

Screening, more screening, monitoring and an understanding of the signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer are key to early detection.  A myth that must be dispelled is that cervical cancer is the same as ovarian cancer.  Just because a patient has a normal pap smear, does not exclude the possibility of ovarian cancer. Simply put, the pap smear test has nothing to do with the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Unfortunately, recent studies suggest that many women rely on their normal pap smear result to conclude that they do not have an ovarian problem.

It must also be understood that what some doctors loosely characterize as an ovarian cyst does not necessarily exclude the possibility of ovarian cancer. If your doctor tells you that you have an ovarian cyst because of a mass identified on ultrasound, make sure to inquire about the basis for the conclusion that the mass is”just a cyst.” Sometimes the ultrasound is the only study performed to identify the mass.  As great as ultrasounds are, they are not always the most accurate studies.  This is particularly true for patients who are obese or overweight. Radiologists will often read ultrasounds in such patients as limited because of “body habitus” (the physique of the patient). Keep in mind that most of these ultrasounds are performed in clinics, and they are read by obstetricians, who are not trained radiologists. You must ask your physician if the mass is a solid mass or a mass filled with fluid. If it is a solid mass or your physician cannot answer the question, you may want to consider further studies. Don’t let your physician simply guess that the mass must be a cyst because of its size or because of some general statistical probability. In any event, both cysts and solid masses require further monitoring.

The symptoms of ovarian cancer include but are not limited to:

  • Swollen abdomen
  • Unusual or excessive vaginal bleeding
  • Pelvic and/or abdominal pain and/or heaviness
  • Back pain
  • Unexpected weight gain or loss
  • Increased urinary frequency or urgency
  • Lethargy
  • Constipation
  • Indigestion
  • Nausea and vomiting

If you and your physician suspect ovarian cancer, the following are useful diagnostic modalities:

  • Alpha fetoprotein
  • Blood chemistry
  • CA125 (may be done if ovarian cancer is strongly suspected or has been diagnosed, and to follow the cancer during or after treatment)
  • CBC
  • Quantitative serum HCG (blood pregnancy test)
  • Urinalysis
  • Abdominal CT scan or MRI of abdomen
  • GI series
  • Ultrasound
  • Pelvic laparoscopy
  • Exploratory laparotomy

If you are experiencing these symptoms, you may want to address the possibility of ovarian cancer with your physician.  Some physicians will generally perform an ultrasound. If they are not impressed with the ultrasound, they may not pursue any other diagnostic modalities.  If the ultrasound reveals a mass, some physicians may elect to wait and perform a follow-up ultrasound in a few months.

Notwithstanding how aggressive your physician is to rule out ovarian cancer, remember that physicians rely on your feedback, and you alone truly know the extent and severity of your symptoms.  Depending on your clinical presentation, waiting for 3 or 6 months for a repeat ultrasound may be unacceptable. Ovarian cancer can spread quickly within a matter of a few months from a stage I cancer to a stage IV cancer.  Take the initiative to fully explore all available diagnostic modalities with your physician. Don’t be uncomfortable asking your doctor for additional diagnostic tests or more frequent monitoring.  The worst thing you can do is become a passive participant in a complex and stressful process guided by a physician, who may not fully appreciate the extent and severity of your symptoms.

If you are an ovarian cancer patient, share your story with our readers. How long did it take for you to find out you had ovarian cancer? In retrospect, what would you have done differently as a patient?

Related Blogs:

New study links gene to ovarian cancer and may assist in early detection
Ovarian Cancer – The Smear Test Won’t Tell You Much

Epidural Analgesia – What Should an Expectant Mother Consider? What are the risks?

Monday, November 8th, 2010

Statistics show that about 70% of women in the U.S. elect to have epidural analgesia during labor. While epidural analgesia is very effective at helping women cope with the pain of labor, it is important to have an appreciation for the possible complications associated with such medical treatment.  If you are an expectant mother, the last thing you want to do is think about the possible risks of epidural analgesia – while you are in labor.  The decision to have epidural analgesia during labor should not be a hasty, last minute decision.  The following is a survey of a number of complications associated with epidural analgesia.  It is intended to provide expectant mothers with a general understanding of the various complications associated with epidural analgesia and to encourage further inquiry.

It is important to know that epidural analgesia may cause infection (i.e., epidural abscess). An epidural abscess is a collection of pus in the epidural space.  As the abscess gets larger, it will eventually compress the spinal cord resulting in neurological deficits (e.g., numbness and/or weakness in the legs). An epidural abscess requires immediate medical intervention.

Moreover, be aware that certain patients with blot clotting disorders are at a higher risk for bleeding (i.e., epidural hematoma). Women who are on blood thinners (e.g., Lovenox) or who are otherwise hypocoagulable are at an increased risk for developing hematomas during epidural infusions. Epidural hematomas may also cause spinal cord compression leading to potential paralysis.

Because the epidural space is only a few millimeters wide, there is a risk that the needle used to gain access to the epidural space may cross into the subdural and/or subarachnoid space.  The administration of epidural anesthesia beyond the epidural space may lead to a number of very serious complications.  When epidural anesthetic agents are administered beyond the epidural space, a patient may experience low blood pressure,   difficulty breathing, loss of motor function and sensation, nausea, loss of consciousness and even cardiac arrest.   The puncture of the dura may lead to an outflow of cerebral spinal fluid into the epidural space.  When this happens, patients complain of severe headaches, which could take days or weeks to resolve.

The inadvertent administration of an excessive amount of epidural agents may cause nerve damage as well.   Anesthesiologists are very careful to select the right epidural drugs based on the patient’s medical history, comorbidities, age, height, and weight.   The key to avoiding epidural toxicity is making sure that the proper dosage of an epidural medication is administered.  In part, this involves a determination of the acceptable dosage per unit of body weight (i.e., ml/kg).  Epidural toxicity may lead to permanent loss of motor function and sensation in the lower extremities.  If you elect to have epidural analgesia, demand to be evaluated and monitored by an anesthesiologist or certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) during the epidural infusion and throughout the anesthesia recovery period.

Some patients may be allergic to certain epidural agents.  Because most epidural administrations involve a cocktail of different medications (e.g., fentanyl and bupivacaine), an anesthesiologist should be familiar with the patient’s history of allergies.  If you are considering epidural analgesia, make sure that you are not allergic to “caine” drugs or opiates.

Epidural analgesia may also make it more difficult to push during labor. Consequently, the use of epidural analgesia may lead to other medical interventions, including the use of Pitocin and a Caesarean section.

If you are an expectant mother, talk to your obstetrician about the risks associated with epidural analgesia.  The decision to proceed with epidural analgesia should be a considered decision.  Your physician can avoid some, if not most, complications associated with epidural analgesia by performing a proper and thorough assessment of your risk factors and by carefully monitoring you during labor and the recovery period.

Have you or someone you know had any complication associated with an epidural? Share your story with our readers. We welcome your comments.