Archive for the ‘Patient Safety’ Category

Simulation Labs: Helping Teach Nurses in Baltimore

Tuesday, September 27th, 2011

From nursing.jhu.edu

Any one who has ever had a hospital stay or knows a loved one or friend who has been in the hospital knows that the nurses play a vital role in caring for patients. Nurses do many of the day-to-day activities of caring for patients in hospitals and clinics. They are also often the first ones at the bedside if a problem arises – so -isn’t it essential that nurses be well trained in all forms of emergency procedures? Even when doctors are present, nurses often play vital roles in assisting the doctors in providing life-saving care to patients.

Law and Medicine Intersect Once Again

I have recently been working on a case in which both doctors and nurses were present during an in-hospital delivery that ended with a significant injury to the child. During the delivery, a problem was encountered that has a low incidence rate during deliveries.  In considering this problem, I wondered just how frequently doctors and nurses are able to practice the skills they would need to successfully and calmly deliver a baby in a situation like this.  Faced with this “emergency” situation, how many of the doctors and nurses in the room had not experienced this problem before? For those who had –  just how much “experience” did they bring to the problem they were facing?

Simulations Rooms and Simulation Patients Provide Training Opportunities

Thankfully, technology is making it more feasible for training healthcare providers to practice handling a myriad of clinical situations during their education process that they might otherwise not experience frequently enough for their skills to develop in real world settings. In Baltimore, the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing (JHUSON) has simulation rooms in which nursing students are able to practice a variety of procedures and techniques using simulation patients in rooms that are designed to replicate the real patient areas of the hospital. There is also a whole family of simulators to help. This “sim fam” is not like the lifeless plastic dummies you might be imagining. They are a variety of different types of “…life-like practice manikins, including Sim Man, Vital Sim Man, Noelle with newborn, and Sim Baby [that] give nursing students the hands-on experience without the anxiety of working with actual human beings.”

Harvey the Cardiac Sim, SimNewB and Sim Man 3G  - All New Additions to the “Sim Fam”

From nursing.jhu.edu

Just this year, in March, JHUSON added Harvey to its collection of simulators.  While Harvey is new to JHUSON, he is not exactly new technology:

For almost 40 years Harvey, developed in cooperation between Laerdal Medical Corporation and Miami University Miller School of Medicine, has been a proven simulation system teaching bedside cardiac assessment skills that transfer to real patients, and remains the longest continuous university-based simulation project in medical education.

Harvey’s job is to be able to simulate “nearly any cardiac disease at the touch of a button: varying blood pressure, pulses, heart sounds, and murmurs. The software installed in the simulator allows users to track history, bedside findings, lab data, medical and surgical treatment.”  He joins a collection of other sim patients that enable healthcare providers to learn and practice critical life-saving measures such as CPR, defibrillation, intubation and yes – even the proper checking of vital signs. JHSON has adult, child and baby versions of these simulators. Some of them can even “talk” to the practicing nurses. (I wonder if they are programmed to be cooperative and informative or hostile and combative – hmmm.)

New Family Members Arrived this Past August

Even newer, in August, JHUSON added SimNewB and Sim Man 3G to the family. The SimNewB is:

…a 7 pound, 21 inch female baby, with realistic newborn traits. Students will be able to simulate a wide variety of patient conditions with her, including life-threatening ones. The department’s current Sim baby is the size of a 6 month old and is not as conducive to delivery room procedures.

She is also interactive, though she is not wireless like the Sim Man 3G. Some of the new Sim Man’s traits include “…breath sounds both anteriorly and posteriorly, … pupil reactions, [and] skin temperature changes.”

What about Obstetrics Cases?

So, what about the case I was mentioning that involved obstetrical care? Well, JHUSON also has a pregnant simulator, which is can be used to practice a whole host of obstetrically related procedures. These include “Leopold maneuvers, normal vaginal and instrumented delivery, breech delivery, C-section, and postpartum hemorrhaging, among other functions.” The JHUSON sim family also has the new Sim newborn – SimNewB.

The “Jury” Is Still “Out”

Can there be any doubt that additional hands-on practice opportunities with simulators is a good idea for situations that may not come up very often in everyday practice? Won’t it help healthcare practitioners gain skills and keep those skills up-to-date? Any opinion I might have on these issues is not based on evidence….yet. Luckily, JHSON is “…among 10 nursing schools nationwide collaborating on a landmark study to find out just how well patient simulators—high-tech manikins that respond to a nurse’s care—help prepare the nurses of tomorrow.”  I – for one – will certainly be interested in the outcome of that study.

What about you? Do you think that it makes sense for nurses in training to make use of simulation rooms and simulated patients? Would it be better for them to spend more time in real world situations doing real patient care under the supervision of experienced practitioners? What about techniques that might not come up very often?

If any of the readers of this post have used these sim patients in your training and can give us firsthand information as to how, if at all, it carried-over to make you more “experienced and skilled” when facing similar clinical situations with real patients, your comments would be most welcomed as well.

Asthma News: Parents Underestimate Children’s Symptoms, Placebos Effective in Improving Patient’s Subjective Improvement but Not Objective Health

Monday, July 25th, 2011

image from consumerreports.org

A couple of months ago, one of my colleagues, Jon Stefanuca, wrote a post for Eye Opener entitled Four Tips For Getting the Medical Care You Need When You Are Having An Asthma Problem. In that article, he explained the importance of patients proactively knowing and explaining their asthma symptoms to healthcare providers. He focused on some of the key features of asthma and the unique symptoms that each individual may experience. If you have not already read that article, I highly recommend it as a great way to become a better advocate for yourself or someone in your life that suffers from asthma.

Over the last few months, I have been thinking about Jon’s advice in relation to some work I have been doing. It makes good sense and hopefully will help people receive better care when they are having exacerbations of their asthma. However, I was disheartened to read a recent article from Reuters about how frequently parents underestimate their children’s asthma symptoms.

Parents Underestimate Their Children’s Asthma Symptoms

I am always a little leery of studies that are drugmaker-funded, particularly when the study suggests that perhaps more medications are needed to combat a problem. However, taken at face value, this is a pretty frightening idea given how many children now suffer from asthma and how serious a condition it can be for those children and families. The article points to a disconnect between the parents’ description of their child’s asthma and whether the asthma was actually being adequately treated:

While more than seven out of every 10 parents interviewed described their child’s asthma as “mild” or “intermittent,” the disease was adequately treated in only six in 10 kids.

A doctor who was not involved in the study explained it this way:

“Parents are only aware of asthma when the child is more severely ill,” Dr. Gordon Bloomberg…

“Physicians cannot just ask the parent ‘how is your child doing?’ The physician will get a global answer that doesn’t reflect the child’s quality of life,” said Bloomberg, of Washington University in St. Louis.

Poor treatment may influence asthmatic children’s quality of life, as well as that of their families.

In the survey, more than four in 10 parents reported missing work because of their child’s asthma, and similar numbers of parents regularly lost sleep for the same reason.

Children are Better Reporters Than Their Parents of Symptoms

Interestingly, “[t]he study also found children tended to be better than their parents at determining how well their asthma was being treated.” So, clearly, doctors must take the time to discuss the asthma symptoms and treatments not only with parents but also in a sensitive and appropriate way with the children patients themselves in order to receive a better indication of the disease status. The doctors interviewed for the Reuter’s article had different opinions on what this means for asthma treatment:

According to a new report, this suggests parents need more education about asthma medications.

But one expert said more medication is not the be-all and end-all for children.

“The idea of total control…is not where we should be putting our energy,” Dr. Barbara Yawn from Olmstead Medical Center in Rochester, Minnesota, told Reuters Health in an email.

Instead of just giving children with stubborn breathing problems more medication, she said better communication is needed to determine how children’s lives are affected, and what it will take to prevent their symptoms.

New Study Shows Receiving Treatment, Even with Placebo, Important for Asthma Patients – But Does not Improve Objective Health

image from 123rf.com

In another recent study, reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers looked at how asthma patients responded to a medication (bronchodilator), two different types of placebos (fake inhaler or fake acupuncture), or no intervention at all. An objective measure was taken of the patient’s ability to exhale after each intervention (or lack of intervention) and the patient’s own rating of improvement was noted. What was so interesting about this study were the different outcomes between the objective (spirometry) and subjective (patient’s self-reporting) measurements of improvement.

The bronchodilator provided markedly better objective treatment over the placebos or no treatment – a 20% improvement rather than 7% for the placebos or no treatment. However, the subjective measure of improvement found that patients were almost the same, 45-50% improvement, whether the patients received the actual bronchodilator (50%), the placebo inhaler (45%) or the sham acupuncture (46%).  All of which were higher than the 21% improvement reported by those who did not receive intervention.

An article about the study in medicalnewstoday.com explains the outcome this way:

Now a study of asthma patients examining the impact of two different placebo treatments versus standard medical treatment with an albuterol bronchodilator has reached two important conclusions: while placebos had no effect on lung function (one of the key objective measures that physicians depend on in treating asthma patients) when it came to patient-reported outcomes, placebos were equally as effective as albuterol in helping to relieve patients’ discomfort and their self-described asthma symptoms.

The study’s senior author, Ted Kaptchuk, Director of the Program in Placebo Studies at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School explained it this way in the article:

“It’s clear that for the patient, the ritual of treatment can be very powerful…This study suggests that in addition to active therapies for fixing diseases, the idea of receiving care is a critical component of what patients value in health care. In a climate of patient dissatisfaction, this may be an important lesson.”

However, I wonder if it cannot also be understood another way – which is that patients are likely to feel like their symptoms have been improved after a visit to a doctor, even if objectively their airway is still compromised.

How Should this Impact Asthma Treatment?

So what can be done with this new information? I think that Jon’s advice about patient’s knowing their own symptoms and expressing them clearly to their doctors is critical. I also agree completely with his advice that patients should ask for an objective measure of their respiratory improvement before leaving a health care facility. These two steps seem key to making sure that patients objective health is being improved – not just their subjective opinion of improvement. Finally, I think that it is critical that parents act as the best advocates possible for their children – which may include making sure that the children are heard on their own symptoms since parents are not the most reliable reporters.

What do you think? Are there other tips for asthma patients and their parents out there? How do respond to these new studies?

Related Videos:

Videos about Asthma

Related Articles:

Four Tips For Getting the Medical Care You Need When You Are Having An Asthma Problem

Asthma – How to Protect Your Child When the Steroid Inhaler Fails

Use Of Acetaminophen In Pregnancy Associated With Increased Asthma Symptoms In Children

Week in Review: (July 2 – July 9, 2011) Eye Opener Health, Law and Medicine Blog

Saturday, July 9th, 2011

Eye Opener’s Week in Review

From the guest editor:         Good morning! I was hoping that you would take a break from making your “to do” list to stop by and check in with us. As usual, we have been busy blogging. And practicing law. And getting ready for trial. And in trial! Needless to say, we have been pushing it to the limits. In truth, we wouldn’t have it any other way. Before we get back to trial preparation, lets take a step back and look at the past week.

–Jason Penn, guest editor

Litigating for the Sake of Litigating: A Temptation to Be Resisted

By Jon Stefanuca

What do you do when your opposing counsel forgets that the practice of law is a profession and not a blood sport? What do you do when the phase “zealous representation” gets confused with “obnoxious obstructionist behavior?” When faced with similar frustrations, Jon Stefanuca broke out his keyboard and explained what we litigators deal with on a day to day basis. Being a lawyer is a very rewarding profession, but like any other, it has its share of frustrations. Don’t take my word for it, read more

Can Copper Surfaces and Duct Tape Reduce Hospital Infections and Deaths?

By Sara Keogh

Germs are in your kitchen.  They are in your bathroom and your bedroom.  They are on your fingertips and even on your tongue.  And everyone knows that there are going to be germs in hospitals. Even the best hospitals have to work to keep the patients, rooms and visitors clean and safe.  Sara Keogh reported on news that may make keeping hospitals and other health care environments less germy in the future. Two simple solutions, copper and duct tape, might have a major impact on infection control.  Read more

Sneak Peak of the Week Ahead:

The Eye Opener and its writers are excited about the week ahead too!  Here’s a sneak peak of what’s in store for you:

  • Service dogs for children:  more than just a pet
  • Legal Boot Camp is back in session and Part IV of our Cerebral Palsy tutorial.
  • And more!

Images courtesy of:

www.lifehack.org

www.mountainpulse.blogspot.org

 

Can Copper Surfaces and Duct Tape Reduce Hospital Infections and Deaths?

Thursday, July 7th, 2011

Image from medgadget.com

How many times have you heard about someone entering the hospital healthy, or relatively so, and developing a dangerous infection while hospitalized? What about the number of times that you may have visited your own doctor’s office or your child’s pediatrician’s office and wondered whether the cold you got a few days later was coincidence or the result of having been in the waiting and exam rooms following other sick patients? Have you ever considered what cleaning procedures are done in hospital rooms when one patient is discharged before another takes their place?

In the past, Brian Nash and the other legal bloggers here at Eye Opener have written posts and made mention of the importance of hospital cleanliness and sterility, see the related posts below. We have been involved in cases involving the devastating results of infections. However, everyone knows that there are going to be germs in hospitals. Even the best hospitals have to work to keep the patients, rooms and visitors clean and safe.

Well, there is news that may make keeping hospitals and other health care environments less germy in the future. Two recent articles have focused on seemingly simple solutions, copper and duct tape, that may have major impacts on infection control.

Copper Surfaces Dramatically Reduce Infections by Killing Bacteria

A Reuters’ article reports that a recent study “presented at the World Health Organization’s 1st International Conference on Prevention and Infection Control (ICPIC) in Geneva, Switzerland” shows that “replacing the most heavily contaminated touch surfaces in ICUs with antimicrobial copper will control bacteria growth and cut down on infection rates.” According to the Reuters’ article:

[a]ntimicrobial copper surfaces in intensive care units (ICU) kill 97 percent of bacteria that can cause hospital-acquired infections, according to preliminary results of a multisite clinical trial in the United States. The results also showed a 40 percent reduction in the risk of acquiring an infection.

This news could have a profound impact on health-care costs, disease spread, and most importantly lives lost. If hospitals are able to replace some of their current surfaces with copper surfaces, at least in the parts of the hospital that are most frequently the source of infections, there could be a dramatic improvement in hospital-acquired infections.

Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) are the fourth leading cause of death in the United States behind heart disease, strokes and cancer.

According to estimates provided by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, nearly one in every 20 hospitalized U.S. patients acquires an HAI, resulting in 100,000 lives lost each year.

From Reuters

Perhaps even more infections could be prevented if these changes could be made outside of just ICUs. For instance, perhaps copper surfaces could replace highly touched surfaces on sink handles, the doors to hospital rooms, hospital bed rails, or in out-patient surgery centers and long-term care facilities that are not housed within hospitals.

Duct Tape Warnings Keep Others Far Enough Away from Infected Patients

Image from ducttapesales.com

An article from Medicalnewstoday reports that some hospitals are using plain duct tape – just colored red – to achieve a reduction in infection rates from highly infectious patients without having to deal with the hassle and expense of all visitors or hospital personnel who enter the room having to rescrub and use new gowns every time they enter the room of an infected patient. The study looked at highly infectious diseases like C. diff that require isolation of patients and very careful hand washing to avoid spreading the infection. So how does duct tape help?

The Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) commissioned a study to corner off a three foot perimeter around the bed of patients in isolation. Medical personnel could enter the room unprotected if they stayed outside the perimeter. Direct patient contact or presence inside the perimeter meant a redo of the cleansing process. The concept, called “Red Box” employs red duct tape, a color used as it provides a strong visual reminder to those who enter the room to be aware.

The study found that 33% of all who entered the rooms could do so without the addition of gowns and gloves, saving the environment, hospital and patient costs, and time without compromising the patient or the medical personnel.

From Medicalnewstoday

How Else Can We Reduce Infections?

What ideas do you have for the use of copper surfaces? Do you think that copper surfaces or duct tape could make a dramatic difference in the safety of hospital admission? What about the cost? Do you think that hospitals would pay the upfront costs of replacing surfaces with copper to be able to dramatically cut infection rates? What about other low cost solutions like duct-tape around the perimeter of the bed? Can you think of other low-cost solutions that could minimize infections and maximize safety?

Related Posts:

New federal study finds ‘lax infection control’ at same-day surgery centers

FDA warning to healthcare professionals: use sterile prep pads!

July 1 – New Residents, New Rules……Again!

Monday, June 13th, 2011

Last year, I wrote a blog on “The July Effect”, a long-observed phenomenon of increased hospital deaths during the month of July that was substantiated by medical data and statistics just last year. These data seemed to specifically relate these deaths to the influx of new medical school graduates into teaching hospitals as first-year residents of those institutions. The conclusions of the study seemed well-substantiated. I further elaborated on some of the potential causes of errors being made that could result in harm to patients; what I didn’t elaborate upon was the rigorous and demanding schedule that residents assume.

In 2003, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) instituted new policies regarding the time limitations of ALL residents, but specifically focused on the first year resident. These limitations were placed on the number of hours that residents could and should work in any given week or rotation in an effort to safeguard the health of the resident but more so to ensure the safety and well-being of patients being treated by these residents.

It is now 2011, and the ACGME is instituting even stricter limitations affecting both first year and mid-level residents; Nixon Peabody does a great job of delineating the changes in the guidelines. Much information has been published in the last year regarding the continued occurrence of medical errors despite protocols and safety mechanisms in place to protect patients (click on related blogs below). It seems that the ACGME is attempting to address some of these errors by addressing the fatigue factor of medical and surgical residents in training. The overall maximum hours per week will not change; it remains at 80 hours.  Yes, twice that of “normal” jobs. One big change is the limit on the maximum continuous duty period for first year residents; this will be decreased from 24 to 16 hours.  It will remain 24 hours for residents after their first year, but recommendations include “strategic napping.” Another change is the additional duty time, previously allotted as 6 extra hours to perform clinic duty, transfer of care, didactic training, etc.; for first year residents, these duties are to be included in the overall 80-hour work week, but after the first year, the residents will be allowed 4 additional hours. A third big change is the minimum time off between duty periods. Previously, it was noted that all residents “should have” 10 hours between shifts; year 1′s are still recommended to have 10  hours off, but they MUST HAVE AT LEAST 8! Intermediate-level residents should also have 10 hours off, but they also must have at least 8 hours off with a mandatory 14 hours off if they just completed a 24-hour shift. Final year residents are recommended to receive 8 hours off, but this is still being reviewed.  One thing that has not changed is the mandatory 1 day off in 7, averaged over 4 weeks.

Many of us watch the medical TV shows, but none of these shows really paint the true picture of medical residency training. As a Physician Assistant student, I trained alongside medical residents and medical students, alike. My training mirrored theirs in the hospital setting, and it happened well before the 2003 ACGME recommendations. There were times during my surgery rotation in a trauma center during which I worked 36 hours straight, followed by 10 hours off, then back to 10- and 12-hour days. The working hours entailed clinic time, managing daily in-patient care, many hours in the operating room, admitting patients during the overnight hours from the emergency room and emergency surgery for trauma victims, hours and hours at a time, in the overnight hours and during the day.  By the end of 36 hours, the exhaustion was indescribable. It is easy to understand how and why mistakes happen. After these crazy shifts, no one ever looked so glamorous as those who are depicted on television shows…..TRUST ME!

July 1, 2011, marks the date when over 100,000 medical residents across the USA from ACGME-accredited training programs start their training in teaching hospitals/institutions across this great nation. We should applaud the ACGME for looking at the data, analyzing studies regarding sleep deprivation, and putting forth these guidelines, not only to aid in patient safety but also to protect the health and well-being of these doctors in training. The pressures of residency are incredible. It is interesting that there was and still is opposition to the duty-hour limitations, citing oppositional rationale such as the residents do not learn enough in 16 hours, and small institutions do not have the support staff to treat all of the patients without the addition of medical resident hours.

So, who is going to fill those gaps created by the resident-hour restrictions placed by the ACGME come July 1st? Each institution will have to look at its own hospital model and decide according to current standards. In 2003, many of these gaps were filled by Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners; I suspect this will again be the case.  These mid-level practitioners are quite capable of providing many of the services necessary in hospital settings; they are a growing and well-respected addition to the healthcare team, and I suspect that their usefulness and potential will be more fully appreciated with the institution of healthcare reform!

For more information and Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) regarding the ACGME guidelines, please go to the website and click on the links!

And, no matter who is caring for you or your loved one, never be afraid to ask questions about therapies and medications being ordered. Be informed!

Related Posts:

“The July Effect”: Where To Seek Medical Care When The Heat Is On

Medical Malpractice – Serious Medical Errors: Failure of the System or Just Plain Ignorance

Study Finds Regional Hospitals Often Are Better At Preventing Medical Errors Than Academic Centers – Kaiser Health News

Tort Reform or Just Plain Medical Care Reform: the debate continues as thousands are injured annually in US hospitals

 

 

 

 

 

 

Children’s Medications: Coming Changes and Tips to Avoid Overdose

Tuesday, May 24th, 2011

We all know that a little over-the-counter (OTC) pain medication can be just what the doctor ordered for minor aches, pains or to help combat the symptoms of a nasty flu. Most adults, however, also realize that medications can be dangerous. No, I am not talking about the blast from the past news stories about medications that have been tampered with (…though it is weird that the Unabomber, Ted Kaczynski, is back in the news as one possible suspect in the Tylenol poisonings that killed people in the Chicago area in 1982). My focus today is on the danger involved with overdoses of commonly used pain medication. In particular, the risk of accidentally overdosing children on OTC pain relievers such as Tylenol.

Image from www.tylenol.com

There has been quite a bit of focus recently on the possible changes to Tylenol and other acetaminophen containing drugs for children. These are not formula changes and they have nothing to do with the myriad of Tylenol recalls over the past couple of years. Currently, the basic concern is that overdoses of this common medication accounts for a fairly sizeable number of poisoning cases, which can be very serious since overdose can cause liver damage to children. An AP article reports that:

Dosing errors with children’s acetaminophen products accounted for 2.8 percent, or 7,500, of the 270,165 emergencies reported to poison centers last year, according to the American Association of Poison Control Centers.

Overdoses can be caused by parents not reading the label, misinterpreting the dosing instructions or using a spoon or other container instead of the cup included with the product.

These overdose situations most often occur in children under 2 years old.

Chart provided on www.tylenol.com

When I read this, I was not surprised. Currently acetaminophen for children, Tylenol and other brands, come in two different concentrations.  Most commonly one is labeled “Children’s” and the other “Infant’s.” Each of these medications include on the outside packaging a confusing little matrix that details the correct dosage for a child of a particular age or weight range. The correct dosing for your child’s age and weight may not be the same if you have a child that is particularly large or small for their age. Additionally, if you have both children’s and infant’s acetaminophen products in your home, you must be careful to provide the correct dosing for the correct concentration. This does not even get into the differences in dosing between the liquid medicine and the tablets. Finally, the box does not provide dosing information for children less than two years of age. The dosing instruction for children under 24 months is “ask your doctor.” So, how many of you are going to make that phone call?

The harsh realities of parenting and sick kids

My children are both young; the youngest is now a little past her second birthday. In the last few years, we have had both infant and children medication in the house, liquid and tablets, and I have been very careful to make sure to double-check myself if I ever have to medicate either child to make sure that I am reading the correct dosing matrix for the correct concentration and for the correct child. More often than not, I have found that children need medication when their parents are tired. As parents know – children frequently get sick in the middle of the night and when children in the house are sick nobody in the household sleeps well. I always try to take this into account to avoid dosing errors. However, this can be confusing particularly when children are little.

When my children were very little, I used to ask the doctor at each appointment what would be the correct Tylenol dose for their current weight. I did not foresee having to use that information, but I wanted to make sure that I knew the correct amount in case I was caught with a sick child in the middle of the night. If it had been a while since my child was weighed, I would sometimes have to call for dosing information. Additionally, I found that it was nearly impossible to dose a child properly using the little cups included with the medication. However, the medicine packaging clearly states that you are only to dose using the enclosed cup. I found that my ability to dose the correct amount of medication was much improved when I used a syringe style dropper.

The FDA steps in – finally!

Well, apparently, I have not been alone in my concerns. The FDA panel that met last week, has made some recommendations that may improve some of these problems in the future and lessen the chances that children will receive too much medication. According to the AP article, the following recommendations have been voted on and will be recommended to the FDA:

  • Dosing instructions should be added for children younger than 2 years old
  • Dosing instructions should be provided based on a child’s weight (rather than the focus being on a child’s age)
  • Limiting cup measurements to milliliters  (rather than both teaspoons and milliliters…one of many things that make the current measurement cups confusing)
  • Mandating a single dosage for children’s solid acetaminophen tablets

Infant Tylenol (and other acetaminophen products) a thing of the past

Relatedly, the article mentioned that the Consumer Healthcare Products Association, which includes the makers of Tylenol and many other acetaminophen producers, agreed to voluntarily stop producing infant drops. This decision means that a day may be coming soon when there would only be one concentration available of children’s acetaminophen.

Some tips and tricks to avoid overdosing your child

If infant acetaminophen is eliminated and children’s acetaminophen is sold with the changed dosing instructions, I think that parents and other caregivers will find it much easier to provide children with the correct amount of medication. However, I would still recommend taking the following steps to protect your children:

  • Keep all medications, including children’s acetaminophen, in a locked closet or other locked secure location away from children.
  • Do not forget to re-secure medication, even when children are sick, so that children are not accidentally able to overdose (when using medicine frequently the temptation to leave it accessible should not overcome the safety element of keeping it away from little hands).
  • Keep a list of the current weight of each child in the house available with the medications so that a caregiver (or tired parent) knows the weight of each child to be able to refer to the dosing chart when needed.
  • Use a clearly marked cup or syringe that is specifically for medicine to dose your child – do not use a household spoon or other imprecise measuring tool.
  • If in doubt on dosing, call the pediatrician to be sure – do not guess!
  • When multiple people will be caring for a sick child (or if you are tired), make sure that you note down the time of each dose of medication to ensure proper timing between doses to avoid accidental overdose.
  • Read the ingredients on any medication carefully to ensure that you do not give your child multiple medications containing the same ingredient – acetaminophen is sometimes added to other medications in combination drugs.

The best advice

Obviously, since I am not a doctor, you should check with your pediatrician if you have any questions about what the correct method is for providing medication to your child, but these tips will hopefully help eliminate some of the more common medication errors in your home.

Your take?

Do you have other tips to share? What about the recommended changes, do you think that additional changes are needed? Do you use fever-reducing medications in your child if your child is not displaying other symptoms, or do you allow the fever to do its work its way out?

Working Conditions for Nurses Impact Patient Health

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2011

I suspect that anyone who has spent even as much as one day or night in a hospital knows just how critical the nursing staff is in the , health, care and comfort of a patient. A compassionate and personable nurse can put a patient at ease and help them feel better in ways that go beyond just medicine.

Recently, I wrote about how different schedules impact nurses’ lives and how they cope with shifting from day to night schedules. This week, I was drawn to write about nurses again after seeing an article on medicalnewstoday.com that spoke about a study done by the University of Maryland School of Nursing.

According to the article, the study determined that “[b]etter working conditions and better staffing of nurses can significantly improve the care of patients with serious conditions…” The study examined the psychological demands and work schedules of nurses:

…they measured high psychological demands by very fast work, lack of time to complete work, excessive required work, being slowed by delays from other workers, and frequent interruptions.

The data showed “…pneumonia deaths were significantly more likely in hospitals where nurses reported increased psychological demands and more adverse work schedules.” Equally troubling, “…patients were more likely to develop deep vein thrombosis after surgery in hospitals where nurses reported high psychological demands.” These were not the only areas in which the demands placed on nurses negatively impacted patient health.

The researchers calculated the association between job demands on nurses, both psychological and physical, and work schedule, against outcomes of patients with heart attacks, congestive heart failure, stroke, and surgeries that open a bone flap of the skull [craniotomy].

Also, they discovered that deaths from congestive heart failure were also significantly associated with long shifts and with nurses continuing to work while sick.

They found that deaths from heart attacks were associated with nurses frequently working with awkward postures and heavy weekly burdens.

Patients were more likely to experience postoperative hemorrhaging when their nurses were frequently interrupted.

And, where nurses reported a lack of time away from the job, patients were significantly more likely to develop respiratory failure and infections.

While difficult working conditions for nurses have a negative impact on patient health, the article reported that “[p]ositive aspects of the practice environment, such as peer and supervisor support, did not offset, or balance, the adverse impact of these demands.” Only, “[h]ospitals where nurses reported a focus on patient safety were less likely to have such complications or adverse patient outcomes [compared to] hospitals where patient safety was not a stated focus.”

What should be done with this information? To me, the critical lesson here is that work conditions for nurses dramatically influence patient outcomes. Attention must be paid to the conditions for nurses in terms of scheduling, interruptions, time off, and other work conditions. Do hospitals currently examine nurses’ psychological and physicals burdens as part of a comprehensive focus on patient safety? How as a patient do you chose a hospital – do you look only at the doctor’s qualifications or do you look also at other factors such as nursing at the hospital? Is it the duty of a hospital to provide working conditions for nurses that promote optimal patient safety?

 

Week in Review (April 23 – 29, 2011): The Eye Opener Health and Law Blog

Saturday, April 30th, 2011

From the Editor:

Last week was a busy but productive week for our firm’s blawgers – 6 posts – and we actually practiced law a lot! My personal thanks to our writers for taking the time to post some important pieces on health, safety, medicine and law. To our readers, my continued and sincere thanks as well. While it’s great to pull-out our soapbox and write about stuff we do and are passionate about, it’s incredibly rewarding to have you, our readers, take the time to read what we write. To those who left comments, a special thanks. We really enjoy interacting with you!

Now on to the business at hand. What did we write about that you may find interesting? Here you go.

My Pet Peeves About the New Age Mediation Process

Having been inspired by a fellow blawger from New York, Scott Greenfield, who chided legal bloggers (thus the name “blawgers”) for simply rehashing news and not taking a stand on issues, I wrote a piece called Mediation of Lawsuits: The 5 Top Things that Tick Me Off!

Having recently been through a number of mediations that were enough to pull your hair out because of the silliness that people engage in when they claim they are mediating to get cases resolved, I decided that it was time to take a stand and post a personal rant. While perhaps best understood by lawyers, claims adjusters and mediators, this blawg was not intended just for them. I’ve seen what impact foolish approaches and conduct by the participants to mediation can have on my clients, the injured parties. It was time to sound-off; so that’s what I did. I once again invite anyone who has been a party to a lawsuit mediation to do your own personal sound-off and tell us what it was like for you. It’s your turn to tell us just how much you enjoyed the process and what can be done to make it better. Read the horror story told in our Comments section by one of our Canada readers when she went through a domestic mediation process. Share your thoughts and stories as well.

Health Care: Who’s “Voiceless” When It Comes to Being Heard on Capitol Hill

Guess I had too much time on my hands at the beginning of this week (not really!). I couldn’t help but be inspired by a piece Jason Penn had done last week about how families were so adversely affected by the budget cuts that were made when the government shutdown was looming a few weeks ago. As I was going through my Google Reader early this past week, I came across an Op Ed by a doctor, who was complaining or at least suggesting that the president and congress need to hear more what doctors had to say about health care reform. Having read that, Jason’s piece jumped into my mind and the result was my blawg entitled Health Reform: What voice does the patient have in the debate.

The post brings to light the amount of money being spent by the healthcare industry in its lobbying efforts on health care reform. ObamaCare‘s raison d’etre is explored as well since it is ironic, if not sad, how the story behind all this money, lobbying and legislation seems to have been lost in the rhetoric. More affordable, better and available health care for our citizens? Then why were the most needy among us the victims of back room wheeling and dealing when the time came for budget cuts to save the federal government from closing its doors? I ask the question – who’s voice is being heard – but more important – who’s is not?

FDA approves use of “meningitis drug,” Menactra, for younger children

Hopefully you’ll never need to use this information, but if you do, Jason Penn reported on a condition – meningitis – that can affect not only adults and older children, but infants and toddlers as well. Meningitis is generally defined as an inflammation of the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord. Prior to a recent change in position by the FDA, there wasn’t a vaccine available for children under the age of 2. Now, with the FDA’s recent approval, Menactra can be used to vaccinate children from the age of 9 months to age 2.

In addition to this news release, Jason tells parents about the signs and symptoms they should be aware of to spot this condition.

The classic symptoms of meningitis are a high fever, headache and stiff neck. Detection of these symptoms, particularly headache and stiff neck are certainly difficult to detect in infants and toddlers. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, infants with meningitis may appear slow or inactive, have vomiting, be irritable, or be feeding poorly. Seizures are also a possibility.

To learn more about this important topic, read his piece Meningitis & Your Baby: Three Things to Think About.

Why are children still dying because of venetian blinds?

Sarah Keogh wrote what I believe is a very important piece for parents, grandparents or anyone who has a baby in the house. Years ago we all heard about the horror of parents finding their babies dead from strangulation when their necks became entangled in venetian blinds. Years have passed since those stories made the front page. Well, an update on just how well manufacturers and parents have been doing to avoid such tragedies was recently posted in The New York Times.

In her blawg entitled Window Blinds: Why are Children Still Dying, Sarah tells us the sad truth that these deaths and injuries still continue in our country. Find out what you as a caregiver of a young child need to realize about this product. Maybe you’ve put the cords up high and out-of-reach for your baby. Maybe you’ve taken other steps to avoid such a nightmarish event ever happening in your home and in your life. Unfortunately, many who have done so have still suffered this tragedy. Why? What is being done by manufacturers and the government to prevent these injuries and deaths ? Read Sarah’s piece for the answers and some practical advice you can take to make your home safer for your child.

Hospitals Reporting Methods for “Adverse Events”

We all know by now that if you want to look good to the public, all you have to do is “play with the numbers.” Well, it seems like hospitals have a penchant for doing just that. One of the key “numbers” that advocates of patient health and safety look at is how many “adverse events” take place in any given hospital. An “adverse event,” as you may already know, is – simply put – any harm to a patient as a result of medical care.

In his post this past week, Jason Penn compares some interesting adverse event bookkeeping by hospitals throughout our country. His blawg, The New Enron? Are Hospitals Cooking the Books?, brings to light serious flaws in the way that our medical institutions “count” the number of so-called adverse events taking place within their walls. His research for this piece reveals…

[M]edical errors occur 10 times more than previously thought.Maybe that wasn’t hard hitting enough. Let me try again. How about this: mistakes occur in one out of every three hospital admissions!

Frankly, that strikes me as an astounding and very concerning number. Are the numbers being reported reflecting this? The simple answer is no. Why not? Read Jason’s post and see what reporting systems are in place – or not in place as the case may be. We all remember Enron. Is this the medical version of “making the numbers look good” when they simply are not!

Surgeons and Booze – an Obvious Bad Combination – Who’s Protecting Us?

It doesn’t take a genius to realize that surgeons should not be under the influence when we as patients are “under the knife” What’s not so obvious is just how prevalent this may be in the operating rooms of our country (and throughout the world).

Wondering what the studies have been done by the medical profession to examine this problem? Have any idea what regulations are in place by hospitals to guard against the problem of “hungover surgeons”?

Wonder no more. Jon Stefanuca’s blog this past week, Hungover Surgeons: Watch Out! There’s Nothing Between You and Their Scalpel!,will tell you all you need to know. Jon queries: “Should hospitals regulate for patient safety?” What do you think? Share your comments.

A “Sneak Peak” of the week ahead

Some more good advice is on the way for parents of special needs children. We all know about what a wonderful aide dogs are for the blind. Mike Sanders will share what he’s learned how these canine wonders are being used for kids in need. Suffering from asthma or know someone who is? Jon Stefanuca will be sharing with  you some valuable information on this topic next week. A number of our clients or their now-deceased family members have suffered from this condition. Jon will share a story or two (without revealing protected confidential information) to bring to light just how this medical condition needs to be better recognized and treated by our health care providers before its too late. We all know what a difficult job nursing can be. That being said, Sarah Keogh will be telling us about some very concerning “trends” that are coming to light in this wonderful profession. Stay tuned for this important piece.

We’ll start next week off with a new blawg by our in-house medical specialist, Theresa Neumann. Her post on how important it can be to get a second opinion before you sign-up for a surgery, procedure or test is sitting in the queue just waiting to hit the pages of The Eye Opener – Views and Opinions from the Nash Community.

One Final Note: I wrote in last weekend’s Week In Review that we intended to post a new White Paper by Marian Hogan on a very important topic relating to Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA). It didn’t happen – because of “my Bad.” I fouled-up and sent the wrong draft of Marian’ s piece to our graphic designer. He did a wonderful job – as usual – of getting it ready – it just wasn’t the right version. The problem is fixed, but my mistake will delay the posting of this important White Paper for another week. Public apology: Sorry, Marian! We’ll make it right soon.


Hungover Surgeons: Watch Out! There Is Nothing Between You and Their Scalpel!

Friday, April 29th, 2011

If you need surgery, you might want to ask your physician not to drink the night before the surgery. According to a recent study, surgeons are a lot more error-prone when operating after a night of drinking.  Sixteen medical student (residents) and eight surgeons participated in the study. They were each asked to perform simulated laparoscopic surgeries without any drinking the night before. Then, they were all invited out to dinner and were asked to drink alcohol as they pleased until they felt intoxicated.  The next day, each participant was asked to perform the same simulated surgeries, and the results were quite surprising.

Each medical student had made an average of 19 errors during surgery.  Their sober counterparts made an average of eight errors. On a side note, the fact that so many errors were made even without any drinking is not making me feel warm and fuzzy at all.  It can take one error, not eight or 19, to seriously injure a patient.

The licensed surgeons did not do much better. The ones who drank had about a 50 % spike in the error rate. Wow!  So, if you see your surgeon ordering yet another Brain Hemorrhage ( 1 part peach schnapps, splash of Irish cream, and a dash of Grenadine) the day before your surgery, you might want to buy him a Virgin Bloody Mary.

Just how prevalent is alcohol abuse among surgeons?

What is the practical importance of this information?  If alcohol impairs surgical performance and alcohol abuse is common among physicians, how safe are we as patients? A number of studies seem to support the conclusion that physicians are more likely to abuse alcohol than other professionals. For example, a study published in the Journal of Addiction, examined trends of alcoholism among male doctors in Scotland. Apparently, as many as 50% of the doctors found to have health problems liable to affect their professional competence were also found to have a drinking problem. According to the same study, the higher rate of liver cirrhosis among doctors suggests that doctors are at a higher risk for alcoholism.  Maybe it has something to do with the wide availability of quality scotch.

Another study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association analyzed the rate of substance abuse among U.S. physicians. Apparently, they are not that different from their Scottish counterparts.  According to this study, U.S. physicians are more likely to consume alcohol than other professionals. I guess one good piece of news for us patients is that, although physicians were as likely to have used illicit drugs in the past, illicit drug consumption was found to be less among practicing physicians. That conclusion, however, may depend on your definition of illicit drug use. According to the same study, physicians are more likely to self-medicate with various drugs that can be just as addictive and impairing as some of the illicit drugs. By the way, it appears that physicians prefer opiates and benzodiazepine tranquilizers to “self-medicate.”

With this in mind, consider the number of surgeries that a surgeon performs a week. While the number may differ depending on the specialty, location, and other factors, many perform multiple surgeries. I have personally met orthopedic surgeons, for example, who perform as many as 5-6 surgeries a day.  If you accept the proposition that surgeons like their booze and that the average surgeon operates multiple times a week, how frequently does a surgeon end operate after a night of intoxicating frivolity?

Should hospitals regulate for patient safety?

This seems to be the ultimate inquiry. Additional research may be necessary to correlate these two variables. After all, no one wants to be operated by a surgeon whose lifestyle makes him 50% more likely to make a mistake. Nevertheless, even absent such information, hospitals and surgeons should take to heart the results of the study.  It might even be prudent for hospitals to enact regulations to prohibit surgeons from drinking the night before scheduled surgeries.

I am unaware of a single hospital that has enacted such a regulation.   Are you aware of hospital regulations designed to prohibit surgeons from drinking the night before scheduled surgeries?  Do you know of any proposed legislation in this regard?  More importantly, if you advocate for such regulations, tell our readers how to get involved. Patients Against Drunk Surgeons (PADS) may be a cause worth fighting for.

 

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