Archive for the ‘Washington’ Category

West Nile Virus is Back in D.C. -Things You Should Do to Stop the Spread

Wednesday, October 12th, 2011

Last week, the D.C. Department of Health confirmed this year’s first case of West Nile Virus (WNV). WNV is a bird disease. However, infected mosquitoes can transmit the virus to humans. Otherwise, this disease cannot be transmitted directly from a human or a bird.  Persons infected with the West Nile Virus may experience severe headaches, fever, nausea, vomiting, muscle aches, pain, and stiffness.

While the risk of a WNV infection is low, individuals who are immunocompromised should be particularly careful and seek medical attention if symptoms are present. Individuals with weak or suppressed immune systems include the elderly, young children and those prone to infections (e.g., HIV/AIDS patients).  The key is to implement measures to reduce exposure to mosquitoes. Individuals at risk should wear long-sleeved shirts and pants. Mosquito repellent should be used as well.

Every year, the Department of Health conducts WNV testing throughout the District, particularly in areas where infections have been reported. If you live in an affected area, you might receive additional information from the Department. Larvicide may be sprayed in your neighborhood. Should you require additional information about WNV, feel free to contact the D.C. Department of Health.

In the meantime, while mosquitoes are still flying around, here are a few things you could do stop the spread of the WNV:

1.  Dispose of cans, bottles and open containers properly.  Store items for recycling in covered containers.
2.  Remove discarded tires. Drill drainage holes in tires used on playground equipment.
3. Clean roof gutters and downspouts regularly.  Eliminate standing water from flat roofs.
4. Turn over plastic wading pools, wheelbarrows, and canoes when not in use.
5. Cover waste containers with tight-fitting lids; never allow lids or cans to accumulate water.
6. Flush bird baths and potted plant trays twice each week.
7. Adjust tarps over grills, firewood piles, boats or swimming pools to eliminate small pockets of water from standing   several days.
8. Re-grade low areas where water stands; clean debris in ditches to eliminate standing water in low spots.
9.¬†Maintain swimming pools, clean and chlorinate them as needed, aerate garden ponds and treat with ‚Äúmosquito dunks‚ÄĚ found at hardware stores.
10. Fix dripping water faucets outside and eliminate puddles from air conditioners.
11. Store pet food and water bowls inside when not in use.

Please share this information with your friends and neighbors.

Attention Ward 7 & 8 Residents! Your Input is Needed!

Monday, September 12th, 2011

Are you living in Southeast and wondering how your money is being budgeted and spent?  Concerned about the direction of the United Medical Center?  Now is the time to act!

Let‚Äôs start with a little bit of background for anyone that is not living in Southeast or familiar with United Medical Center (formerly known as Greater Southeast Community Hospital.) ¬†For years United Medical Center has struggled to pay its bills. In 2006 and 2007, the hospital was in danger of closing, requiring the city to step in to save it. ¬† The Not-for-Profit Hospital Corporation, commonly known as United Medical Center, was established on July 9, 2010 through special legislation. Since then, the new leadership team, its medical staff, and nurses, clinical and support staff claim to be making major improvements in their quality of care, customer service, patient safety and campus security. The facility, which serves many of the city’s poorest residents, also received a new roof and generators, major improvements to the emergency department and replacement of nearly all radiology equipment.¬†¬†Putting the hospital’s claims aside, have you noticed a difference?

The hospital has replaced most patient care diagnostic, monitoring and therapeutic equipment and upgraded most hospital physical plant systems. Over 75 physicians have joined the medical staff.  With changes being made everyday, now is the time to give your input and share your experience with the City Council.

On Thursday, September 29, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., Room 500, 1350 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington DC 20004, a public hearing will be held on issues related to the financial management of the hospital.  This hearing will be open to the public; however, only invited witnesses will be permitted to provide oral statements.  Members of the public may submit written testimony which will be made part of the official record.  Copies of written statements should be submitted to the Committee on Health no later than Thursday October 6, 2011.

Sufficiently concerned?  Make certain that you attend the hearing or, at a minimum, submit your written statements to the committee.

 

DC Hospitals Step It Up During Prostate Cancer Awareness Month – FREE Resources You Need to Know About

Wednesday, September 7th, 2011

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. To raise awareness about prostate cancer, hospitals in Washington, D.C. are stepping-up this September for a good cause indeed.  Did you know that an estimated 240,890 new cases of prostate cancer will be reported this year? About 33,720 men will die this year alone from prostate cancer. About 1 in 6 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during their lifetime.

Although prostate cancer is the most common cancer in American men, the good news is that the survival rate is quite high for patients who are diagnosed and treated early.  If you are a man, a key to your survival is to be familiar with the signs and symptoms of prostate cancer and to seek regular screening.

This year, Georgetown University Hospital will recognize Prostate Cancer Awareness Month by offering men free prostate cancer screening.

Who should get screened?

-          Men over the age of 35 Рparticularly African-American or Hispanic men over the age of 35

-          Men with a family history of prostate cancer

If you meet the above criteria, don‚Äôt miss out on this opportunity. Free screening will be offered on Saturday, September 17, 2011 from 8:00a.m. to 12:00p.m. in the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. Free parking will be available in the Leavey Center garage. ¬†The Georgetown University Hospital is located at 3800 Reservoir Rd. NW, Washington, D.C., 20007. ‚ÄúThe screening will consist of blood testing to determine PSA (prostate specific antigen) level, total cholesterol, and a digital rectal exam (DRE) to be performed by physicians.‚ÄĚ

If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with prostate cancer, you might want to contact the Providence Hospital prostate cancer support group.  This group is specifically dedicated to helping patients live and cope with prostate cancer. Brothers Prostate Cancer Support Group meets every 4th Tuesday between 6:30p.m. and 8:30 p.m. at Providence Hospital’s Wellness Institute (1150 Varnum St. NE, 3rd Floor, Washington, D.C 20017).  For more information, please call 202-269-7795.

Please share this information with your friends, fans, and readers. For more information about cancer support groups in the D.C. area, please visit DC Cancer Consortium.

We’re Launching a New Facebook Page for Washington, D.C.

Saturday, September 3rd, 2011

Washington, D.C. - D.C. Court of Appeals Building

By: Brian Nash, Editor 

We are very pleased to announce the launching of our new Facebook page, DC Eye Opener. For the many thousands of readers who have read our posts in Eye Opener over the past twenty or so months, we want to let you know that we will be continuing to post there as well.

Our blawgers have been posting articles and commentaries on issues relating to health, law and medicine for almost two years now. We have had over 150,000 visitors to our site since our inception. We thank each and every one of you who have stopped by and read our posts – particular thanks to our many subscribers.

So Why Washington, D.C.?

Well, the answer is quite simple – it’s one of the primary places where we practice law.

I moved from New Jersey to Washington, D.C. in 1965 and attended The Catholic University of America in Northeast D.C. While in college, I worked at the Safeway on 12th Street (sadly no longer there) as a grocery clerk and produce man, just up the road from Turkey Thicket and Providence Hospital. After I graduated from CUA, I taught for two years at Bullis Prep in Potomac, Maryland. I attended law school at the Columbus School of Law (Catholic University Law School) and obtained my Juris Doctor in 1974. I was admitted to the D.C. bar in 1976, two years after being admitted to the Maryland bar. I have been trying cases in the District of Columbia ever since. Frankly, I’ve lost track of the number of cases I’ve handled in D.C. over the years. There have been so many trials in the local and federal courtrooms of Washington, D.C. that some suggested I give up my office space and simply take up residence in the hallways of the Superior Court or in the federal district court across the street.

A number of the lawyers I began practicing with have now become judges on the Superior Court and the United States District Court for the District of Columbia. A few of my former law partners have donned the black robe and have made quite a career for themselves in the Superior Court. I am proud and pleased to call them my colleagues and my friends.

During the early part of my career, I represented numerous D.C. individuals, corporations and healthcare providers as a defense lawyer. As you can no doubt tell from our website, we are now representing people injured through the wrongdoing of others. It has been a wonderful journey, which continues on. Our lawyers at Nash & Associates, Marian, Mike, Jon and Jason, are all admitted to the District of Columbia bar as well as the Maryland bar. (Sarah Keogh is presently admitted to the Maryland bar only – we’re working on her to add D.C. to her impeccable credentials.) Simply put – the District of Columbia is our turf. One of our offices is located on Connecticut Avenue, N.W., just a half a block from the Red Line’s Farragut North Station on Connecticut and K Streets, N.W.

So Why the New Facebook Page for D.C.?

What we have seen and learned in our social media activities of blogging, Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn is that our message can become diluted through worldwide distribution. We decided we needed to¬†narrow our audience. Put another way, so many times we wanted to post information about what’s happening in law, medicine and health in the District of Columbia, but when your readers are from around the globe, there’s not much interest in the message and information if it’s just about Washington, D.C. Now we want to share our message and get to know you, who live and work¬†in the District of Columbia. Frankly, our readers throughout the United States – “outside the Beltway“¬†as they say – don’t really care much about what’s happening in D.C. ¬†Well we do and we know you do too!

Our Mission

Simply put, we’re going to bring you information that we hope will keep you informed about topics such as your health, trends in medicine, the laws that may affect you, what’s happening on the legal front in the areas of our expertise (negligence, medical malpractice and the like) and some postings about what’s happening around the city from our legal eye perspective. Our goal is to interact with you, have some fun, provide some useful information – all the things that social media is designed to do and has been doing so well for years now.

For those in the Twitterverse, we’ll soon be launching our new Twitter name/location. Collectively, our tweeps at Nash & Associates have over 5,000 followers. We should have our DC Twitter page up and running this week – we’ll post that new location here. In the meantime, if you want to connect on Twitter, we’re waiting to make your acquaintance at NashLawFirm.

Let’s connect! We’ve met so many great people and businesses on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. We hope to soon count you among our friends and followers.

So, HELLO and WELCOME, D.C. – glad we finally get to share, meet and connect with you!

 

 

 

 

 

 

For close to two years now, our blawgers have been bringing

 

Photo from loringengineers.com

 

Week in Review (April 16 – 20, 2011) The Eye Opener Health, Law and Medicine Blog

Saturday, May 21st, 2011

From the Editor (Brian Nash)

Another week of great posts (IMHO) by our blawgers. Apparently, I’m not the only one who thinks so since we have now surpassed 21,000 page views in the last 30 days. The number keeps rising. Our sincere gratitude to all our readers!

Our topics were once again quite varied. They spanned the law, health, science and medicine. We even had a piece on a local event – Marathon Kids. This piece is part of our new program to promote charities and civic organizations in our own backyard – Baltimore and Washington.

We try week in and week out to find topics of interest for you, our readers. If you ever have any suggestions for topics of interest to you, please leave a comment or send us an email or fill-out the contact form with your thoughts and suggestions. We’d love to hear from you.

Let’s get to it then. What did we cover this past week that you might be interested in reading? Take a look -

Why early settlement is a win-win for all

By: Michael Sanders

There is an old adage in the law that cases settle on the courthouse steps. There is a reason for that. When the parties are actually walking into court to try their case, they seem to suddenly recognize that there are significant risks to going to trial, and that there is serious money at stake. When you go to trial, only one side can win. The other side goes home a loser. Faced with such a stark outcome, both sides tend to become more reasonable in their assessment of their case and more willing to talk settlement. After all, despite all the years of experience that trial attorneys amass, no one can ever predict what a jury is going to do in any specific case. As one mediator I know likes to tell the litigants, going to court is like going to Vegas:¬† you roll the dice and you take your chances. Read more….

Milk from Mom: Effective in preventing common infant complication (NEC)

By: Jason Penn

The debate among parents regarding the use of human milk vs. formula wages on, but according to a recent¬†study,¬†you can chalk one up for the human body. ¬†That study, headed by the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, concluded that premature babies fed human donor milk were less likely to develop the intestinal condition necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC).¬† Both sides has its advocates, willing to do battle at any time. When it comes to NEC, Mom‚Äôs milk has the decided advantage. Read more….

H.I.V. treatment advances, but what are the implications of terminating research early?

By: Sarah Keogh

Last week, I read some exciting news about H.I.V. treatment and transmission. A New York Times¬†article reported that a large clinical trial found that ‚Äú[p]eople infected with the virus that causes¬†AIDS are far less likely to infect their sexual partners if they are put on treatment immediately instead of waiting until their immune systems begin to deteriorate‚Ķ‚ÄĚ The study found that ‚Äú[p]atients with¬†H.I.V.¬†were¬†96 percent less likely to pass on the infection¬†if they were taking antiretroviral drugs‚Ķ‚ÄĚ These findings are overwhelmingly positive and the implication for public health is huge. Read more….

A Windy, Rainy but Fabulous Day in Baltimore: Marathon Kids Final Mile Celebration

By: Rachel Leyko

Despite the wind and rain, this past Saturday I volunteered at the¬†Marathon Kids Final Mile Celebration Event at Western Polytechnic High School in Northwest Baltimore.¬† I learned of the event through the Junior League of Baltimore and to be honest, prior to Saturday, I did not know much about the organization, its purpose or effect on the children it sought to serve.¬† However, after Saturday‚Äôs event, not only was I impressed with the purpose of Marathon Kids, but I saw firsthand the positive effect this program has had on the children who have participated. Read more….

Acquired Brain Injuries: Causes and Impact

By: Theresa Neumann

On the heels of¬†Jason Penn‚Äôs blogregarding calling ‚Äú911‚Ä≥ for signs of a possible stroke, I decided to introduce a variety of acquired brain injuries for further discussion in future blogs since damage to the brain results in some of the most catastrophic injuries possibly sustained by the human body with significant ‚Äúcollateral damage‚ÄĚ for all of the friends and family involved in the individual‚Äôs life. Read more….


Sneak Peak of the Week Ahead

Some topics we’ll be covering next week…and then some…

  • You or someone you know has been diagnosed with cancer, now you have to deal with the horror. Jon Stefanuca will be writing a piece based on our experiences with a number of clients “living with cancer.”
  • Mike Sanders and I have both recently resolved cases involving families who have lost a child. Mike’s involved the death of a fetus very near term. He’ll share that story and the experience of the case with you.
  • Maybe those of you who have children with special needs are familiar with the local (Maryland and Washington, D.C.) resources to help you and your child. For those who may not be or just want to learn more, Jason Penn will be providing information on this next week.
  • You may have heard the recent news about labeling of certain medications for children. Sarah Keogh will report on this and also delve into some practical problems and issues that parents face every day in terms of medicating their children.
  • We’re going to begin a new series on exactly what is recoverable in our jurisdictions (Washington, D.C and Maryland) under what is known as the Survival Act and the Wrongful Death Act. We’ll be paying particular attention to issues involving what’s known as pecuniary benefits, loss wages and diminished earning capacity. Should be educational. We hope you enjoy it.

Have a great weekend, Everyone!