Posts Tagged ‘angina’

Angina : The Efficacy of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention vs. the Efficacy of Non-Surgical Treatment

Sunday, March 28th, 2010

Angina is characterized by chest pain resulting from insufficient blood flow to the heart. In this context, abnormal blood flow is caused by the build up of plaque in the coronary arteries or as a result of coronary artery stenosis. Consequently, angina symptoms are usually indicative of heart disease. It is estimated that nearly seven million people in the United States have angina and that nearly 400, 000 patients present with new cases of angina each year.

A recent study published by Annals of Internal Medicine compared the efficacy of percutaneous coronary intervention vs. the efficacy of non-surgical medical care in treating angina in patients with stable coronary artery disease. Percutanious coronary intervention refers to coronary angioplasty. The study in question involved cardiac angioplasties with and without cardiac stents. Non-surgical treatment refers to drug treatment of angina symptoms.

Researchers performed a comprehensive review of 14 previous trials, which compared the efficacy of coronary angioplasty (with and without stents) vs. non-surgical medical care. In total, the 14 trials involved 7818 patients. Researchers concluded that older trials suggest that percutaneous coronary intervention was only marginally more effective in the treatment of angina. This, however, did not appear to be true in more recent trials. The study suggests that coronary angioplasty may not be necessary or recommended to treat angina in patients with stable coronary artery disease if proper evidence-based medications are employed.

Contributing author: Jon Stefanuca