Posts Tagged ‘Baltimore’

FES Equipment Coming to Baltimore’s Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital

Thursday, September 8th, 2011

Author - Sarah Keogh

Back in February, Jon Stefanuca wrote about a study in the Journal of Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair about Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) and the benefits it can provide to those individuals who have suffered spinal cord injuries. He explained how FES is able to provide electrical impulses to stimulate paralyzed muscles. The study’s authors found improvements based on using FES that led them to recommend using stimulation therapy in conjunction with occupational therapy for patients with incomplete spinal cord injuries. This technology is now also being used to help people with a wide range of injuries and illnesses including, stroke, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, and cerebral palsy, in addition to spinal cord injuries. According to the Christopher and Dana Reeves Foundation website, FES works by applying “small electrical pulses to paralyzed muscles to restore or improve their function”. The benefits can be extensive:

FES is commonly used for exercise, but also to assist with breathing, grasping, transferring, standing and walking. FES can help some to improve bladder and bowel function. There’s evidence that FES helps reduce the frequency of pressure sores. From: Christopher and Dana Reeves Foundation website

Improved Technology To Be Locally Available

Since FES was originally developed, the technology improved from being something that was typically integrated into large expensive equipment, such as exercise bikes and wheelchair based equipment, into smaller more portable devices. The good news for individuals with neuro-motor injuries in Baltimore City and the surrounding areas is that this type of FES treatment is about to become more available locally. At the end of August, Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital announced that they have received a “Quality of Life” grant from the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation. The article explains:

The money will help Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital purchase Bioness® equipment for its Adaptive Equipment Rehabilitation Clinic (the clinic). The clinic works with patients with neuro-motor disorders to maximize their movement as much as possible given their physical limitations.

From Bioness.com

The Bioness website explains that they produce a variety of “medical devices designed to benefit people with Stroke, Multiple Sclerosis, Traumatic Brain Injury, Cerebral Palsy, and Spinal Cord Injury. These products use electrical stimulation to help people regain mobility and independence, to improve quality of life and productivity.” While I do not know what particular equipment will be available at the Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital, Bioness makes equipment to assist patients with hand paralysis, foot drop and thigh weakness among other conditions.

MWPH Uses Interdisciplinary Approach Combining FES and Therapy

The article about the grant explains some of the many wonderful things available for patients at the Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital (MWPH):

  • …[an] interdisciplinary approach to the assessment and management of adolescents and children with neuromuscular impairments, paralysis and/or movement disorders
  • … [a] team of 21 experienced specialists in physiatry, occupational therapy, and physical therapy.

The new equipment at MWPH will be used along with the other occupational and physical therapy options available to patients. A study described in US Neurology looked at stroke victims and found the combination of FES and traditional therapies that include repeated motion provide the best results:

Stroke patients with limited voluntary movement could now benefit from technologies such as functional electrical stimulation (fes) combined with necessary repetition of functional tasks (use-dependent plasticity) to enhance the neural repair process and improve outcomes, thus enabling them to begin to overcome their previous limitations and to improve their physical capabilities.

From Bioness.com

The goal at MWPH for children and adolescents is based on a similar idea:

Patients whose muscles can be retrained will require several months of therapy to gain normal range of motion and strength. For those patients with more severe conditions where muscles cannot be retrained, the Bioness® equipment will be used to augment their range of motion. Using these two therapy modalities, patients will acquire greater functionality, range of motion, muscle strength, and the ability to move independently.

This multi-disciplinary approach should allow these children and teens to have the best chances of improved motor use and the most independence in their future lives.

Related Articles:

Coming Soon? Restored Breathing for Spinal Cord Injury Patients

Spinal Cord Injury Updates: More Reasons for Optimism?

New Treatment Holds Promise for Patients With Spinal Cord Injuries

New Microchip Promises to Make Life Much Easier for Paraplegic Patients

Nash & Associates in the Community: Wendy Kopp and Teach for America

Thursday, June 23rd, 2011

Tai Dixon of Baltimore Teach for America and IThe Eye Opener serves many purposes.  Not only do we serve as patient advocates, but we do our best to provide information to the community on a variety of topics.  There is little else that is more important to the health of a community than its educational system.  Committed to the health of our community, I recently attended an event sponsored by the Enoch Pratt Free Library:  An intimate discussion with Wendy Kopp, author of A Chance to Make History.

By most objective standards, many of our nation’s schools are failing.  The national conversation about education has been ongoing and has resulted in a series of changes to the way we educate our children.  The people driving those changes often go unrecognized by the greater public.  Their efforts are profound, but unless you are in some way connected to the educational movement, their names are not easily recognized.  Let me introduce Wendy Kopp and Teach for America.

“Wendy Kopp is the chief executive officer and founder of Teach For America, whose mission is to build the movement to eliminate educational inequity by enlisting the nation’s most promising future leaders in the effort. She is also chief executive officer and co-founder of Teach For All, which is working to accelerate and increase the impact of this model around the world.

Wendy proposed the creation of Teach For America in her undergraduate senior thesis in 1989. Today more than 8,000 Teach For America corps members are in the midst of two year teaching commitments in 39 regions across the country, reaching over 500,000 students, and 20,000 alumni are working inside and outside the field of education to continue the effort to ensure educational excellence and equity.

Since 2007, Wendy has led the development of Teach For All to be responsive to requests for support from social entrepreneurs around the world who are passionate about adapting the model to their contexts. Teach For All is a growing global network of independent organizations pursuing this mission in 18 countries, from India and China to Brazil and Lebanon. ”

Recently, Wendy was in town to discuss the education of America’s children.  The same questions remain:  “How do we ensure that every child is provided with a top-notch education, regardless of their socio-economic status?”  “How can we empower teachers to change the lives of their students?”  “How do we ensure that education is funded at appropriate levels?”  At an event moderated by Freeman Hrabowski, president of my alma mater UMBC, Wendy provided insightful answers to these questions.  The progress made in Baltimore and Washington D.C. schools is remarkable and is in no small part as a result of the efforts of Teach for America.

The reality, however, is that Wendy Kopp, Teach for America and its supporters cannot do it alone.  Improving education should be a community goal shared by all.  So I issue the challenge to you:  what can you contribute to ensure that our children receive an excellent education?  Can you give your time?  Your wealth?  Please feel free to leave your comments below…

Credit:  www.teachforamerica.org

Related Links:      Charity begins at home:  OriolesREACH program hits a grand slam with us!

Pictured above:  Tai Dixon of Baltimore Teach for America and I.

Week in Review (April 16 – 20, 2011) The Eye Opener Health, Law and Medicine Blog

Saturday, May 21st, 2011

From the Editor (Brian Nash)

Another week of great posts (IMHO) by our blawgers. Apparently, I’m not the only one who thinks so since we have now surpassed 21,000 page views in the last 30 days. The number keeps rising. Our sincere gratitude to all our readers!

Our topics were once again quite varied. They spanned the law, health, science and medicine. We even had a piece on a local event – Marathon Kids. This piece is part of our new program to promote charities and civic organizations in our own backyard – Baltimore and Washington.

We try week in and week out to find topics of interest for you, our readers. If you ever have any suggestions for topics of interest to you, please leave a comment or send us an email or fill-out the contact form with your thoughts and suggestions. We’d love to hear from you.

Let’s get to it then. What did we cover this past week that you might be interested in reading? Take a look -

Why early settlement is a win-win for all

By: Michael Sanders

There is an old adage in the law that cases settle on the courthouse steps. There is a reason for that. When the parties are actually walking into court to try their case, they seem to suddenly recognize that there are significant risks to going to trial, and that there is serious money at stake. When you go to trial, only one side can win. The other side goes home a loser. Faced with such a stark outcome, both sides tend to become more reasonable in their assessment of their case and more willing to talk settlement. After all, despite all the years of experience that trial attorneys amass, no one can ever predict what a jury is going to do in any specific case. As one mediator I know likes to tell the litigants, going to court is like going to Vegas:  you roll the dice and you take your chances. Read more….

Milk from Mom: Effective in preventing common infant complication (NEC)

By: Jason Penn

The debate among parents regarding the use of human milk vs. formula wages on, but according to a recent study, you can chalk one up for the human body.  That study, headed by the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, concluded that premature babies fed human donor milk were less likely to develop the intestinal condition necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC).  Both sides has its advocates, willing to do battle at any time. When it comes to NEC, Mom’s milk has the decided advantage. Read more….

H.I.V. treatment advances, but what are the implications of terminating research early?

By: Sarah Keogh

Last week, I read some exciting news about H.I.V. treatment and transmission. A New York Times article reported that a large clinical trial found that “[p]eople infected with the virus that causes AIDS are far less likely to infect their sexual partners if they are put on treatment immediately instead of waiting until their immune systems begin to deteriorate…” The study found that “[p]atients with H.I.V. were 96 percent less likely to pass on the infection if they were taking antiretroviral drugs…” These findings are overwhelmingly positive and the implication for public health is huge. Read more….

A Windy, Rainy but Fabulous Day in Baltimore: Marathon Kids Final Mile Celebration

By: Rachel Leyko

Despite the wind and rain, this past Saturday I volunteered at the Marathon Kids Final Mile Celebration Event at Western Polytechnic High School in Northwest Baltimore.  I learned of the event through the Junior League of Baltimore and to be honest, prior to Saturday, I did not know much about the organization, its purpose or effect on the children it sought to serve.  However, after Saturday’s event, not only was I impressed with the purpose of Marathon Kids, but I saw firsthand the positive effect this program has had on the children who have participated. Read more….

Acquired Brain Injuries: Causes and Impact

By: Theresa Neumann

On the heels of Jason Penn’s blogregarding calling “911″ for signs of a possible stroke, I decided to introduce a variety of acquired brain injuries for further discussion in future blogs since damage to the brain results in some of the most catastrophic injuries possibly sustained by the human body with significant “collateral damage” for all of the friends and family involved in the individual’s life. Read more….


Sneak Peak of the Week Ahead

Some topics we’ll be covering next week…and then some…

  • You or someone you know has been diagnosed with cancer, now you have to deal with the horror. Jon Stefanuca will be writing a piece based on our experiences with a number of clients “living with cancer.”
  • Mike Sanders and I have both recently resolved cases involving families who have lost a child. Mike’s involved the death of a fetus very near term. He’ll share that story and the experience of the case with you.
  • Maybe those of you who have children with special needs are familiar with the local (Maryland and Washington, D.C.) resources to help you and your child. For those who may not be or just want to learn more, Jason Penn will be providing information on this next week.
  • You may have heard the recent news about labeling of certain medications for children. Sarah Keogh will report on this and also delve into some practical problems and issues that parents face every day in terms of medicating their children.
  • We’re going to begin a new series on exactly what is recoverable in our jurisdictions (Washington, D.C and Maryland) under what is known as the Survival Act and the Wrongful Death Act. We’ll be paying particular attention to issues involving what’s known as pecuniary benefits, loss wages and diminished earning capacity. Should be educational. We hope you enjoy it.

Have a great weekend, Everyone!

Baltimore Loses a True Sports Legend and a Gem of a Man – Ernie Tyler

Saturday, February 12th, 2011

Ernie Tyler - Baltimore Orioles Legend (photo by daylife.com)

Friday, on the way to the office, the news came across my car radio that Orioles Great, Ernie Tyler, had died. For those of you not from Baltimore or who don’t follow the Orioles, you might ask: “Who is Ernie Tyler? What was his ERA, or his batting average, on base percentage…?” Well, those were not statistics that were associated with this legend of Baltimore sports. You have no doubt heard about Baltimore’s Iron Man – Cal Ripken, Jr., who was drafted in the second round by the Orioles in 1978, played his final game on October 6, 2001, and set the all-time record for consecutive games played at an astounding figure of 2,632. Now you should know about Baltimore’s other Iron Man – Ernie Tyler, who put-up a bigger consecutive games number than Cal – 3,769.

Why haven’t you heard about this Iron Man? Why hasn’t he been featured by national media? Maybe because Ernie was one of those behind the scenes people, without whom the game would not be the same. The irony is, however, that Ernie really wasn’t behind the scenes; he was front and center at every Orioles game – he was the Orioles’ “umpires attendant,” who performed his job with grace, diligence and panache for over 50 years!

Sure, I saw Ernie performing his job whether I was sitting in my seat at a game or watching from my couch. I didn’t know the man personally, but every Orioles fan must have that feeling that they did know Ernie. He didn’t perform his tasks of delivering new balls to the home plate umpire with a unique flair or in some attention-grabbing outfit. When a foul ball was lying listless in the dirt behind home plate and needed to be removed so the game could play on, there he was, with what is described by former Oriole’s great, Mike Boddicker, as his “meat hooks” hands, swooping down on the ball, with his “side-to-side trot” in one graceful movement so the game could resume without delay. We all know that balls need to have the shine treated before games so that pitchers can get a better grip.

Ernie Tyler mudding-up the ball (photo by The Daily Record)

Well, it’s estimated that Ernie mudded-up over 350,000 balls for the games he oversaw. But stats are not what Ernie was all about. They belonged to the man, but he belonged to the fans of the Baltimore Orioles.

The “other Iron Man” breaks his streak for “the Iron Man”

If you want to get a glimpse of what this man was like and why he is revered by Baltimore fans, just ask yourself: how and why did Ernie’s consecutive games streak end? The answer: when Cal Ripken, Jr. was inducted into the Hall of Fame, he asked Ernie to attend. Having faithfully performed his duties from 1960 to 2007, without missing a game over that span of time, Ernie elected to break “the streak” and attend the celebration in Cooperstown, N.Y. Once the festivities were over, he dutifully returned to his place near the Orioles dugout and continued to do “his thing” for the next few years. Ernie was still snatching foul balls and replenishing the umpire’s supply of fresh balls, he had mudded-up well into his 80’s.

Loved by so many and now to be missed by all who knew him

The stories of Ernie and his love of the game, the Orioles, its players, its fans, the city of Baltimore and most of all his family are chronicled in today’s edition of the Baltimore Sun and need not be repeated here. For those of us who only “knew” Ernie from afar, he nevertheless left an indelible mark on our lives. He touched us – and I simply cannot be alone in this feeling – in a very special way. His passing brings to mind stories my father used to share with me as a boy of his growing up in Brooklyn and living next to players from the Brooklyn Dodgers. Time spent on the porch and sharing stories of the Bums, who walked the streets and worked the same jobs as many of their adoring fans. Ernie reminds me of a man of that era – a real baseball man, who lived and breathed the game and brought a smile to the faces of countless baseball fans. A legend among the gods of baseball – in his own special way.

Many have left the game with grace; some with not so graceful an exit. Many have touched the souls of countless fans of America’s sport. Those plaudits are usually reserved for the men who play between the lines from April to October each year. But when a man such as Ernie Tyler passes, a very special word of praise and thanks is in order. So – thank you, Ernie!  We’ll miss you dearly. You are a sports legend of a special kind; the kind of legend that permits the game to pass from generation to generation with grace and charm.

Related Stories

Tyler was the real Mr. Oriole…

Late Orioles umpires attendant Ernie Tyler was like family…(Peter Schmuck)

Baltimore Abortion Ordinance Declared Unconstitutional – How Did We Get Here and Why?

Saturday, February 5th, 2011

Pro-Life and Pro-Choice Advocates

Last April, we posted a blog regarding a Baltimore City ordinance, which required local crisis pregnancy centers to post signs in their clinics disclosing that they did not offer abortion or birth control services if, they in fact, did not offer such services. Because of this requirement, many clinics chose to post separate notices informing the public about clinics that offered abortion services. Consequently, the Archdiocese of Baltimore, filed a lawsuit in the Federal District Court, seeking to have the ordinance declared unconstitutional.  One of its arguments was that the City should be prohibited from compelling speech by requiring the clinics to post signs.

On January 28th, 2011, District Court Judge, Marvin Garbis, ruled that the ordinance violates the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution and, as such, is unenforceable. In his opinion, Judge Garbis wrote: “Whether a provider of pregnancy-related services is ‘pro-life’ or ‘prochoice,’ it is for the provider — not the Government — to decide when and how to discuss abortion and birth-control methods.” According to the opinion, “[t]he Government cannot, consistent with the First Amendment, require a ‘pro-life’ pregnancy-related service center to post a sign as would be required by the Ordinance.”

The dynamic of this litigation is fascinating, revealing nonsensical and unpredictable aspects of the abortion debate.  One could argue that the original passing of the ordinance was fueled by an underlying “pro-life” attitude.  After all, why would the City require clinics that don’t offer abortion services to publically state that they don’t offer abortion services? My personal opinion is two-fold: 1) to discourage individuals in need of abortion services from seeking abortion services, and 2) to reveal to the public the number of clinics that don’t offer abortion services in order to paint a picture that the public is generally pro-life (this is particularly true because the ordinance did not require clinics offering abortion services to post notices that they offered such services).

Interestingly, the ordinance backfired. Some of the clinics required to disclose that they did not offer abortion services chose to inform the public about other clinics where abortion services are available. There is nothing wrong with that, right? Well, apparently the Archdiocese did not think so, and, in my personal opinion, here is the real reason why: As soon as it became apparent that many of the clinics could simply choose to post notices about other clinics, which offered abortion services, it also became apparent that the ordinance was de facto prompting free advertising for abortion services all over the city.

I can’t imagine that the Archdiocese was too thrilled about that. Hence, the litigation ensued and the opponents of the ordinance prevailed on an argument, which is commonly and usually made by the “pro-choice” side of the abortion debate. At the heart of Judge Garbis’ opinion is the notion that the government should not legislate morality or religion. On January 28th, the Archdiocese and other “pro-life” groups prevailed on an argument, which has undermined and discredited the “pro-life” position for decades. How ironic!

Have you have been following this litigation in Baltimore City? What are your thoughts? Was Baltimore’s ordinance misguided or spot-on? Will Judge Garbis’ decision be reversed or upheld on appeal?

Photo from foxnews.com

Plea Agreement To Be Announced In Dixon Case – Politics News Story – WBAL Baltimore

Wednesday, January 6th, 2010

This just in from WBAL ohline.  Read the full story of what took place today in Baltimore City Circuit Court.

Plea Agreement To Be Announced In Dixon Case – Politics News Story – WBAL Baltimore.

UPDATE:  further updated news on the Dixon trial and her agreement to step-down as mayor.

Here’s the essence of the deal – but see the whole story:

BALTIMORE — Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon, the first woman to hold the city’s highest position, will officially resign her post as mayor.

A deal was reached in the case regarding her recent conviction and her future case involving perjury charges, 11 News I-Team reporter David Collins said Wednesday afternoon. Lawyers for Dixon and state prosecutors in her embezzlement trial spent time behind closed doors to discuss details of the deal.

According to the deal, Dixon will get probation before judgment on the embezzlement conviction, meaning she can keep her pension that’s worth more than $80,000 a year.

She’ll also have to make a $45,000 donation to the Bea Gaddy Foundation and do community service with Our Daily Bread. According to the deal regarding the perjury charges, she’s agreed to sell the gifts she received from developers, including a fur coat and electronics she bought with gift cards, and give the proceeds to charity.

The mayor agreed that she would not seek office in the city or state. She will also be on probation for at least four years.

In the perjury case, she has also agreed not to seek or accept taxpayer money for her defense fees.