Posts Tagged ‘Bullying’

Week in Review (May 8 – 13, 2011) The Eye Opener Health, Law and Medicine Blog

Saturday, May 14th, 2011

From Brian Nash (Editor)

It was another busy week of blogging at Nash & Associates.

The topics of the week were wide-ranging: special needs kids and man’s best friend; Ovarian Cancer – tips for getting the best care; school’s responsibility for informing parents when a child is in danger from themselves or others; stroke – particularly in the African-American community; and the role of social media in general and in our firm for getting the word out about wonderful charitable and civic organizations.

This past week also saw the posting our a new White Paper by Marian Hogan on a very real problem in many of our nation’s hospitals – patient controlled analgesia (PCA). Marian’s piece explores the risks and benefits of this great form of pain relief for hospital patients. Unfortunately, many of the practices in hospitals raise serious concerns about the level of monitoring of PCA in terms of patient safety.

See what strikes your fancy and then click the blog’s title, photo orread more” to view the entire article. Enjoy – and – as always – thanks for stopping by!

PCA Patient Controlled Analgesia: Is it Safe in Today’s Hospitals?

Author: Marian Hogan

Patients who undergo a surgical procedure in a hospital are often placed on intravenous pain medications after the procedure. These medications, such as morphine or other opioid narcotics, are frequently delivered by a pump mechanism that can be regulated by the patient. This is termed a PCA or patient controlled analgesia pump.

Studies have found that there are roughly one half million or more in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrests (IHCA) in the U.S. every year and that approximately 80% of those patients who suffer an in-house cardiopulmonary arrest do not survive, or sustain permanent and severe brain injury if they do live. Read more>>

 

Dogs a huge help for special needs kids

By:  Mike Sanders

Dogs and kids just seem to go together. Whether it’s running around the yard and roughhousing or just sitting quietly watching TV together on the sofa, dogs seem to gravitate toward kids. For some special needs kids, however, dogs are more than just a friend and play buddy; they are actually a daily caregiver.

The idea of service dogs for disabled children is a little-known yet burgeoning niche in the world of special needs. Everyone knows about service dogs for the blind. I have to admit that until recently, I had never even considered service dogs for other disabilities, let alone children. Then a friend of mine whose son is autistic mentioned that she was thinking about getting an autism service dog for her son. I was puzzled. Her son suffers from sensory processing disorder so I didn’t understand what a dog would be able to do for… read more>>


 

Ovarian Cancer

 

Ovarian Cancer – five tips to make sure you get the medical care you need

By Jon Stefanuca

Did you know that more than 21,000 women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer in the U.S. each year? An astonishing 15,000 women die from ovarian cancer each year. Despite numerous advances in healthcare, the mortality rate for ovarian cancer has not improved in the last 30 years. Simply put, ovarian cancer is the deadliest of all gynecologic cancers. If the cancer is diagnosed in its early stages (i.e. before it spreads to other organs), the five-year survival rate is . . . read more >>

 

School’s Duty to Parents: Is Your Child at Risk?

By: Sarah Keogh

Recently, I have been thinking quite a bit about schools. My son is going to start kindergarten in the fall and my daughter just started preschool last week. While both of my kids are still little, over the years children end up spending many of their waking hours each week at school. The school becomes as much a part of their lives as home for most kids. As parents, we put trust in the school that they will be keeping our children safe and healthy while we are not around to supervise. But do the schools recognize that trust and live up to it?

I was recently made aware of a situation involving a teenager who was having some health concerns. Her parents had first noticed that their daughter… read more >>

 

Brother, will you help me? If you don’t this stroke might kill me

By: Jason Penn

Mother’s Day is in the rearview mirror.  This past Mother’s Day someone told me a story about how their grandmother fell ill.  It was the holiday season, and as she climbed the ladder to decorate the tree, things took a tragic turn. She stumbled, lost her balance and fell.  She seemed “off.” A few short hours later, at the hospital, it was revealed that she had suffered a stroke. Read more >>

 

Social Media and Spreading the Word about Those Who Do So Much Good for Those in Need

By: Brian Nash

Recently my wife and I attended an event held by a newly formed Baltimore organization known as Rebels with a Cause. Frankly, I have to admit, I hadn’t heard of this organization before. According to the event flyer published by the person we are sponsoring, this is a local group of bicycle riders who are joining the Ride for a Feast 140 mile bike ride from Ocean City to Baltimore, MD. (Whew! Glad I’m only a sponsor).

Saturday night came and we traveled to Gertrude’s, a restaurant at the Baltimore Museum of Art which provided the venue for a pre-event gathering of this group of dedicated, good-cause-driven riders. Read more >>

 


Sneak Peak of the Week Ahead

Some topics we’ll be covering next week….and then some…

  • the “debate” rages on about breast milk.” Jason Penn takes an interesting look at this issue in light of some recent, fascinating work done at Johns Hopkins.
  • a report of a new HIV study, but what are the possible implications for medical implications under controlled studies
  • acquired brain injury – what is it all about – what is its impact?
  • … and more….

Have a great weekend, Everyone!






School’s Duty to Parents: Is Your Child at Risk?

Wednesday, May 11th, 2011

Image from tutoringmontana.com

Recently, I have been thinking quite a bit about schools. My son is going to start kindergarten in the fall and my daughter just started preschool last week. While both of my kids are still little, over the years children end up spending many of their waking hours each week at school. The school becomes as much a part of their lives as home for most kids. As parents, we put trust in the school that they will be keeping our children safe and healthy while we are not around to supervise. But do the schools recognize that trust and live up to it?

I was recently made aware of a situation involving a teenager who was having some health concerns. Her parents had first noticed that their daughter seemed to be altering her eating patterns. Since they were not certain if there was a problem forming and what was going on during the school day, they called the school and asked if the school thought that there was any reason to be concerned. This seemed to be a prudent action for any concerned parent. But what, if anything, is the school required to tell the parents? What if the parents had not noticed a problem, but the school knew that something was not right, would they have needed to call it to the parents’ attention?

Legally, it turns out that a school is considered to stand in loco parentis over the children in its care. This fancy legalese just means that the school stands in as substitute parents during the school day.  This is true of both public and private schools. The school holds a duty to protect and supervise students in its care. The courts have determined that this includes taking care to protect children from foreseeable harm, the way a reasonable parent would do if they were there.

So what does this all mean? Some of this is pretty straightforward. A school needs to protect your children from harm they could foresee. A school has to take reasonable precautions to protect children from getting hurt on the playground or from cars driving around the campus – to the same extent that a prudent parent would do so.  For public policy reasons, schools are often a place where the government often takes an even more active role in monitoring children’s health – for example in doing hearing and vision screenings.

But what about other types of harms? Most parents would want to know if their child was being bullied, was showing signs of developing an eating disorder or was considering hurting him or herself. Does a school have a duty to inform parents anytime there might be a chance of one of these harms?

The law does not seem to be settled in on this point.  Generally speaking, the school would need to take reasonable steps to protect a child if the school could foresee that the child was at risk of being harmed by another child in the school.  The law is not explicit about whether that includes informing the parents. When the risk is not of another child hurting your child but of your child hurting him or herself, the law is much less clear. In Maryland, it seems possible that a school might have a duty to warn a parent if they believe a child is suicidal. The school counselor may have a duty to warn the parent as part of a duty to take reasonable means to prevent the child’s suicide. However, the law is not explicit about when that duty arises.

What do you think? Does a school have a duty to inform parents if there is a reasonable chance that a child might be a danger to him or herself? What if your child is engaging in behaviors that might cause harm over time? Is this the role of a school?

Cyber-bullying: With digital age comes digital crime

Friday, November 12th, 2010

Update (Brian Nash): This morning, May 23, 2011, I saw a tweet linking to news that First Lady, Michelle Obama, is joining Maryland’s Judge O’Malley and Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown in a visit this week to a local Maryland school, Central Middle School in Edgewater, to get the word out on an anti-bullying campaign.

Great work and an important message that needs to keep being delivered! The President and First Lady are using Facebook to get their anti-bullying message out there as well.

Wanting to do my (little) part in getting this message out there, I thought I’d re-post this blog from last November for those who may have missed it on the first time. Spread the word; let’s give a hand to all who work so hard to rid society of this dangerous blight.

Original Post:

Digital media is everywhere, and social networking is totally “in” among our youth as well as adults.  As with every advancement in technology, one is faced with the new problems that accompany that technology. With the advent of personal computers, “hacking” became the big cyber-crime followed by sexual predation.  There have been a multitude of movies in which the plots focus on computer-hacking or on-line dating, and there are plenty of songs referencing cell phones and on-line technology.

We are in the digital age, and with that we are experiencing new and more ominous digital crime that is involving our youth and resulting in the premature death of beloved children.

October, 2006, Megan Meier (age 14) committed suicide after being bullied on MySpace by a supposed friend and the friend’s mother.  In June of 2008, Tomohiro Kato rented a truck and drove into the crowded “geek district” of Tokyo where he proceeded to stab 17 unknown people, killing 7 and injuring 10, because he was being harassed on-line for his ideas and electronic postings on social websites.  This year, beginning in January, a beautiful 15 year-old Irish immigrant, Phoebe Prince, committed suicide after being blatantly harassed by her peers, both outwardly in school and on-line, in Massachusettes.  Two months later, on March 21, 2010, Alexis Pilkington (17yrs) committed suicide after being harassed on a social networking site; she was a good student and soccer “star” in Long Island who had received a college scholarship for soccer.  On September 9, 2010, Billy Lucas, a 15-year-old Indiana student, committed suicide after being blatantly harassed on-line and in school for presumed homosexuality.  The most recent case involved a Rutgers University student, Tyler Clementi (18yrs); he committed suicide after his college roommate illegally videotaped a homosexual encounter and posted it on the internet.  These are a few of the more publicized cases, but, cyber-bullying is much more pervasive in our youth.

Each of these cases represents an unnecessary loss of life prompted by children or young adults, facilitated by the use of digital technology.  The hatefulness and utter meanness of the offending children is astounding.  Bullying has been around for ages, and unfortunately, it is part of human nature, evolution and survival of the fittest.  The problem has become the pervasiveness of digital media in our lives, the anonymnity allowed by it and the ease and speed of which information can be disseminated world-wide.  It used to be that the bullying could be left on the playground at school, and/or that school administrators were more apt to intervene if approached with the problem; neither of these conditions seem to exist anymore.  Compound these issues with the virtual isolation these digital media promote, the often-times dysfunctional family unit (divorce, re-marriage, single-parenting, and even the need for both parents to work full-time), the relative independence of our youth, and the relative insensitivity of our youth to violence and sexually explicit material.

Steve Williams posted an article about Billy Lucas’ death on the organization, Care 2 Make a Difference (www.care2.com) which sited the following statistics related to suicide from the Trevor Project:

  • In the United States, more than 34,000 people die by suicide each year (2007 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC).
  • Suicide is the third leading cause of death among 15 to 24-year-olds, accounting for over 12% of deaths in this age group; only accidents and homicide occur more frequently (2006 National Adolescent Health Information).
  • Suicide is the second leading cause of death on college campuses (2008 CDC).
  • For every completed suicide by a young person, it is estimated that 100 to 200 attempts are made (2003 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey).
  • Lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth are up to four times more likely to attempt suicide than their heterosexual peers (Massachusetts 2007 Youth Risk Survey).
  • More than 1/3 of LGB youth report having made a suicide attempt (D’Augelli AR - Clinical Child Psychiatry and Psychology 2002)
  • Nearly half of young transgender people have seriously thought about taking their lives and one quarter report having made a suicide attempt (Grossman AH, D’Augelli AR - Suicide and Life Threatening Behavior2007)
  • Questioning youth who are less certain of their sexual orientation report even higher levels of substance abuse and depressed thoughts than their heterosexual or openly LGBT-identified peers (Poteat VP, Aragon SR, et al – Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology2009)

Children in this age group, despite their outward mature appearance in today’s world, remain emotionally and intellectually immature.  The teenage human body goes through enormous hormonal changes during this period which compounds emotional lability.  The onslaught of hurtful and demoralizing comments, whether by text-messaging, emails, or social networking sites, can be quite devastating to one’s sense of self and integrity.  The speed at which such information, whether true or false, can disseminate and build momentum amongst peer groups can become overwhelming for the immature psyche, while suggestions to “kill yourself” or threats of murderous intent might just push that individual “over the edge”.

Just last week, Medscape posted an interview with  Gwenn Schurgin O’Keeffe, MD, FAAP, (a pediatrician, health journalist, chief executive officer of Pediatrics Now (www.pediatricsnow.com), an online health and communications company, and the author of Cybersafe: Protecting and Empowering Digital Kids in the World of Texting, Gaming and Social Media ). In the interview, Dr. O’Keeffe defined cyber-bullying, offering suggestions for parents and even medical health providers for monitoring child behaviors and usage of these digital medias, as well as the effects on the individual’s psyche.  Legislation is being discussed on ways to punish these crimes, but the first-line protection begins in the home.  The Massachusettes Attorney General’s Office also displays a page on its website devoted to the topic; it is unclear whether this appeared before or after the Phoebe Prince tragedy, but it is there nonetheless.  One can only hope that changes can be made before those suicide statistics increase exponentially.

I leave you with one of my childhood teachings that I only wish was held in high regard in today’s society:  ”If you cannot say anything nice, then don’t say anything at all.”

Related Post (update):

I also came across a post entitled Stopping Cyberbullying: Who’s Responsible? – Interesting read!

Credit to news.cnet.com for photo