Posts Tagged ‘child health’

Simulation Labs: Helping Teach Nurses in Baltimore

Tuesday, September 27th, 2011

From nursing.jhu.edu

Any one who has ever had a hospital stay or knows a loved one or friend who has been in the hospital knows that the nurses play a vital role in caring for patients. Nurses do many of the day-to-day activities of caring for patients in hospitals and clinics. They are also often the first ones at the bedside if a problem arises – so -isn’t it essential that nurses be well trained in all forms of emergency procedures? Even when doctors are present, nurses often play vital roles in assisting the doctors in providing life-saving care to patients.

Law and Medicine Intersect Once Again

I have recently been working on a case in which both doctors and nurses were present during an in-hospital delivery that ended with a significant injury to the child. During the delivery, a problem was encountered that has a low incidence rate during deliveries.  In considering this problem, I wondered just how frequently doctors and nurses are able to practice the skills they would need to successfully and calmly deliver a baby in a situation like this.  Faced with this “emergency” situation, how many of the doctors and nurses in the room had not experienced this problem before? For those who had –  just how much “experience” did they bring to the problem they were facing?

Simulations Rooms and Simulation Patients Provide Training Opportunities

Thankfully, technology is making it more feasible for training healthcare providers to practice handling a myriad of clinical situations during their education process that they might otherwise not experience frequently enough for their skills to develop in real world settings. In Baltimore, the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing (JHUSON) has simulation rooms in which nursing students are able to practice a variety of procedures and techniques using simulation patients in rooms that are designed to replicate the real patient areas of the hospital. There is also a whole family of simulators to help. This “sim fam” is not like the lifeless plastic dummies you might be imagining. They are a variety of different types of “…life-like practice manikins, including Sim Man, Vital Sim Man, Noelle with newborn, and Sim Baby [that] give nursing students the hands-on experience without the anxiety of working with actual human beings.”

Harvey the Cardiac Sim, SimNewB and Sim Man 3G  - All New Additions to the “Sim Fam”

From nursing.jhu.edu

Just this year, in March, JHUSON added Harvey to its collection of simulators.  While Harvey is new to JHUSON, he is not exactly new technology:

For almost 40 years Harvey, developed in cooperation between Laerdal Medical Corporation and Miami University Miller School of Medicine, has been a proven simulation system teaching bedside cardiac assessment skills that transfer to real patients, and remains the longest continuous university-based simulation project in medical education.

Harvey’s job is to be able to simulate “nearly any cardiac disease at the touch of a button: varying blood pressure, pulses, heart sounds, and murmurs. The software installed in the simulator allows users to track history, bedside findings, lab data, medical and surgical treatment.”  He joins a collection of other sim patients that enable healthcare providers to learn and practice critical life-saving measures such as CPR, defibrillation, intubation and yes – even the proper checking of vital signs. JHSON has adult, child and baby versions of these simulators. Some of them can even “talk” to the practicing nurses. (I wonder if they are programmed to be cooperative and informative or hostile and combative – hmmm.)

New Family Members Arrived this Past August

Even newer, in August, JHUSON added SimNewB and Sim Man 3G to the family. The SimNewB is:

…a 7 pound, 21 inch female baby, with realistic newborn traits. Students will be able to simulate a wide variety of patient conditions with her, including life-threatening ones. The department’s current Sim baby is the size of a 6 month old and is not as conducive to delivery room procedures.

She is also interactive, though she is not wireless like the Sim Man 3G. Some of the new Sim Man’s traits include “…breath sounds both anteriorly and posteriorly, … pupil reactions, [and] skin temperature changes.”

What about Obstetrics Cases?

So, what about the case I was mentioning that involved obstetrical care? Well, JHUSON also has a pregnant simulator, which is can be used to practice a whole host of obstetrically related procedures. These include “Leopold maneuvers, normal vaginal and instrumented delivery, breech delivery, C-section, and postpartum hemorrhaging, among other functions.” The JHUSON sim family also has the new Sim newborn – SimNewB.

The “Jury” Is Still “Out”

Can there be any doubt that additional hands-on practice opportunities with simulators is a good idea for situations that may not come up very often in everyday practice? Won’t it help healthcare practitioners gain skills and keep those skills up-to-date? Any opinion I might have on these issues is not based on evidence….yet. Luckily, JHSON is “…among 10 nursing schools nationwide collaborating on a landmark study to find out just how well patient simulators—high-tech manikins that respond to a nurse’s care—help prepare the nurses of tomorrow.”  I – for one – will certainly be interested in the outcome of that study.

What about you? Do you think that it makes sense for nurses in training to make use of simulation rooms and simulated patients? Would it be better for them to spend more time in real world situations doing real patient care under the supervision of experienced practitioners? What about techniques that might not come up very often?

If any of the readers of this post have used these sim patients in your training and can give us firsthand information as to how, if at all, it carried-over to make you more “experienced and skilled” when facing similar clinical situations with real patients, your comments would be most welcomed as well.

Week in Review (April 18 – 22, 2011) The Eye Opener Health and Law Blog

Saturday, April 23rd, 2011

From the Editor:

This past week, our blawgers (guess I’ll use this term now since we are legal bloggers) were busy on their keyboards once again. They covered a number of topics relating to law, medicine, health and patient safety. This week we posted a primer on aortic aneurysms and how they can present as back pain, a blog about “robot” anesthesiology, a disturbing post about how the recent threat of a federal government shutdown was averted but at a cost to those who are in dire need of healthcare, an interesting piece about laughing gas making its way back into the American medical scene for labor and delivery and finally, and a highly read piece on a not-to-often discussed topic but one of potential grave concern – shift switching by nurses and how this might impact patient safety.

Here’s our usual “quick summaries” for you to peruse, click on, read and comment:

Aneurysms – a deadly condition you need to know about!

Our in-house medical specialist, Theresa Neumann, wrote another highly educational and need-to-know piece about a condition that can present as back pain but which has deadly consequences for those who have this condition.

As Theresa’s research made us aware – “1 in every 50 males over the age of 55 have an abdominal aneurysm, this is a more common pathologic diagnosis than some others.  Men also corner the market at an 8-to-1 ratio as compared to women with abdominal aneurysms.”

As is the case with all of Theresa’s writings, we offer through her valuable information from someone who’s “been there” and “done that” in the clinical setting. Don’t miss her post entitled Aneurysms: A Potential Deadly Condition That May Present as Back Pain.

Who’s using remote control and a joy stick to put a breathing tube down your throat?

Mike Sanders brought to our attention a new practice of anesthesiologists – in Canada – that may soon be part of anesthesia management in the United States as well – using robotics to intubate patients. While you can certainly learn about the concept of intubation by reading Mike’s blog, basically, this is placing a small tube down a patient’s airway so that the anesthesiologist can control the airway and provide ventilation to a patient undergoing surgery.

Here’s an except -

Medical News Today is reporting that Dr. Thomas Hemmerling of McGill University and his team have developed a robotic system for intubation that can be operated via remote control.

For more on this fascinating new project by Dr. Hammerling and his team, read Mike’s post entitled Robot Anesthesiologists?

Government Shutdown Avoided – but who will pay the price for the “deals” that were cut?

The newest member of our blogging team, Jason Penn (fast approaching veteran blawger status) did a fascinating piece of the story-behind-the-story of the recent crisis our country faced when the federal government was on the verge of a shutdown. We all know about deals being cut in the back rooms of congress. We all know that the government avoided a shutdown this time around when the senate and house worked out a compromise that resulted in millions of dollars being earmarked for cuts in the budget.

Jason tells us what programs relating to healthcare will suffer as a result of these negotiated cuts. As some wise person once said, “why is it always those who are least represented who bear the burden of budget cuts?” Maybe it’s because they can’t afford lobbyists to protect them like those who need protection the least can.

Read Jason’s eye opening and no-punches-pulled report on just who will be the victims of the deals in his post of this past week Budget Crisis Avoided, But What About the Babies? Can They Live With $504 Million Less in Funding?

Will moms-to-be now be “laughing” their way through labor and delivery?

One of our seasoned blawgers, who every now and then is driven to report on the off-beat issues of law, medicine and healthcare, Jon Stefanuca, stepped up to the plate once again and took a swing at the return of an old-timer to the arsenal of pain relief for mothers-to-be undergoing labor and delivery – laughing gas!

As Jon’s piece in Eye Opener this past week tells us -

It appears that a number of hospitals are now considering making laughing gas available as a pain relief measure for women in labor. A hospital in San Francisco and another in Seattle have been using laughing gas in their labor and delivery units for a while. Hospitals like Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center plan to offer laughing gas to laboring mothers in the immediate future.

For more about this return of laughing gas to our obstetrical units, read Jon’s piece Laughing Gas Making Its Way Back Into the Labor and Delivery Department.

Nursing and Sleep Deprivation: Is it a risk factor for patient safety?

I suspect somewhere along the line you have done “an all-nighter” – whether it was getting ready for a big test, a social event, or for some other reason. Remember how you felt as you made it through that night or the next day? Have you ever done it several nights in the same week? How about doing it a few times one week and then do the same thing the next week and the next…. Well you no doubt get the idea. You’ve been exhausted, right? Well what about nurses, who have to do this for a living?

Nurses have lives too. They have children, home responsibilities and obligations, and some form of social life. What happens when they swap shifts or are asked to do “a double”?

Sarah Keogh was back blogging this past week and wrote a fascinating (and concerning) post entitled Nurses Switching Shifts: Does a Lack of Sleep Put Patients at Risk? We invite you to read Sarah’s piece and share your comments. Are you a nurse who lives this lifestyle? What are your thoughts about nurses being allowed to work multiple shifts or back-to-back shifts in terms of patient safety? Should there be restrictions on nurses’ shifts just as there (finally) are work restrictions on doctors-in-training?

A “Sneak Peak” of the week ahead

As part of our continuing effort to “get the word out there” on issues relating to health, medicine, patient safety and the law, we post from time to time more extensive research pieces called White Papers. Well, the time has arrived for another White Paper to be posted on our website. Marian Hogan has completed her piece on a very important topic – Patient Controlled Analgesia in today’s hospital environment. She examines how some hospitals are now heavily marketing a spa-like environment so you choose them over the competition. Yet lurking in the shadows of these facilities which promote flat screen TV’s, valet parking, in-room safes and the like is a very dangerous practice: placing patients on patient-controlled-analgesia (for pain relief) without vital monitoring devices and patient safety practices. It’s at the “printer” now; we hope to have it online this week.

From our blawgers you can expect reports on a disturbing fight between manufacturers and child safety experts over – blinds! After decades of controversy, you’ll find out where the battle lines are now drawn, who’s winning and who the real losers are in this war. Wonder how healthcare safety is doing since the report To Err is Human was published by the Institute of Medicine over a decade ago? Jason Penn will be providing an updated report card, which you should not miss. Alcohol and surgery – not a good combination! Jon Stefanuca plans on posting a piece that looks deeper in the obvious problems with this potentially deadly combination.

This is just a taste of what’s to come. I better wrap-up now. I’m working on finishing the third installment on Medical Technology and Patient Safety. Oh yeah, if time permits, I might even get to post a piece I’ve been working on this past week – a lawyer’s rant about our modern day love affair with mediation practices and trends.

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Hope you have a great weekend!