Posts Tagged ‘child safety’

Week in Review (April 23 – 29, 2011): The Eye Opener Health and Law Blog

Saturday, April 30th, 2011

From the Editor:

Last week was a busy but productive week for our firm’s blawgers – 6 posts – and we actually practiced law a lot! My personal thanks to our writers for taking the time to post some important pieces on health, safety, medicine and law. To our readers, my continued and sincere thanks as well. While it’s great to pull-out our soapbox and write about stuff we do and are passionate about, it’s incredibly rewarding to have you, our readers, take the time to read what we write. To those who left comments, a special thanks. We really enjoy interacting with you!

Now on to the business at hand. What did we write about that you may find interesting? Here you go.

My Pet Peeves About the New Age Mediation Process

Having been inspired by a fellow blawger from New York, Scott Greenfield, who chided legal bloggers (thus the name “blawgers”) for simply rehashing news and not taking a stand on issues, I wrote a piece called Mediation of Lawsuits: The 5 Top Things that Tick Me Off!

Having recently been through a number of mediations that were enough to pull your hair out because of the silliness that people engage in when they claim they are mediating to get cases resolved, I decided that it was time to take a stand and post a personal rant. While perhaps best understood by lawyers, claims adjusters and mediators, this blawg was not intended just for them. I’ve seen what impact foolish approaches and conduct by the participants to mediation can have on my clients, the injured parties. It was time to sound-off; so that’s what I did. I once again invite anyone who has been a party to a lawsuit mediation to do your own personal sound-off and tell us what it was like for you. It’s your turn to tell us just how much you enjoyed the process and what can be done to make it better. Read the horror story told in our Comments section by one of our Canada readers when she went through a domestic mediation process. Share your thoughts and stories as well.

Health Care: Who’s “Voiceless” When It Comes to Being Heard on Capitol Hill

Guess I had too much time on my hands at the beginning of this week (not really!). I couldn’t help but be inspired by a piece Jason Penn had done last week about how families were so adversely affected by the budget cuts that were made when the government shutdown was looming a few weeks ago. As I was going through my Google Reader early this past week, I came across an Op Ed by a doctor, who was complaining or at least suggesting that the president and congress need to hear more what doctors had to say about health care reform. Having read that, Jason’s piece jumped into my mind and the result was my blawg entitled Health Reform: What voice does the patient have in the debate.

The post brings to light the amount of money being spent by the healthcare industry in its lobbying efforts on health care reform. ObamaCare‘s raison d’etre is explored as well since it is ironic, if not sad, how the story behind all this money, lobbying and legislation seems to have been lost in the rhetoric. More affordable, better and available health care for our citizens? Then why were the most needy among us the victims of back room wheeling and dealing when the time came for budget cuts to save the federal government from closing its doors? I ask the question – who’s voice is being heard – but more important – who’s is not?

FDA approves use of “meningitis drug,” Menactra, for younger children

Hopefully you’ll never need to use this information, but if you do, Jason Penn reported on a condition – meningitis – that can affect not only adults and older children, but infants and toddlers as well. Meningitis is generally defined as an inflammation of the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord. Prior to a recent change in position by the FDA, there wasn’t a vaccine available for children under the age of 2. Now, with the FDA’s recent approval, Menactra can be used to vaccinate children from the age of 9 months to age 2.

In addition to this news release, Jason tells parents about the signs and symptoms they should be aware of to spot this condition.

The classic symptoms of meningitis are a high fever, headache and stiff neck. Detection of these symptoms, particularly headache and stiff neck are certainly difficult to detect in infants and toddlers. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, infants with meningitis may appear slow or inactive, have vomiting, be irritable, or be feeding poorly. Seizures are also a possibility.

To learn more about this important topic, read his piece Meningitis & Your Baby: Three Things to Think About.

Why are children still dying because of venetian blinds?

Sarah Keogh wrote what I believe is a very important piece for parents, grandparents or anyone who has a baby in the house. Years ago we all heard about the horror of parents finding their babies dead from strangulation when their necks became entangled in venetian blinds. Years have passed since those stories made the front page. Well, an update on just how well manufacturers and parents have been doing to avoid such tragedies was recently posted in The New York Times.

In her blawg entitled Window Blinds: Why are Children Still Dying, Sarah tells us the sad truth that these deaths and injuries still continue in our country. Find out what you as a caregiver of a young child need to realize about this product. Maybe you’ve put the cords up high and out-of-reach for your baby. Maybe you’ve taken other steps to avoid such a nightmarish event ever happening in your home and in your life. Unfortunately, many who have done so have still suffered this tragedy. Why? What is being done by manufacturers and the government to prevent these injuries and deaths ? Read Sarah’s piece for the answers and some practical advice you can take to make your home safer for your child.

Hospitals Reporting Methods for “Adverse Events”

We all know by now that if you want to look good to the public, all you have to do is “play with the numbers.” Well, it seems like hospitals have a penchant for doing just that. One of the key “numbers” that advocates of patient health and safety look at is how many “adverse events” take place in any given hospital. An “adverse event,” as you may already know, is – simply put – any harm to a patient as a result of medical care.

In his post this past week, Jason Penn compares some interesting adverse event bookkeeping by hospitals throughout our country. His blawg, The New Enron? Are Hospitals Cooking the Books?, brings to light serious flaws in the way that our medical institutions “count” the number of so-called adverse events taking place within their walls. His research for this piece reveals…

[M]edical errors occur 10 times more than previously thought.Maybe that wasn’t hard hitting enough. Let me try again. How about this: mistakes occur in one out of every three hospital admissions!

Frankly, that strikes me as an astounding and very concerning number. Are the numbers being reported reflecting this? The simple answer is no. Why not? Read Jason’s post and see what reporting systems are in place – or not in place as the case may be. We all remember Enron. Is this the medical version of “making the numbers look good” when they simply are not!

Surgeons and Booze – an Obvious Bad Combination – Who’s Protecting Us?

It doesn’t take a genius to realize that surgeons should not be under the influence when we as patients are “under the knife” What’s not so obvious is just how prevalent this may be in the operating rooms of our country (and throughout the world).

Wondering what the studies have been done by the medical profession to examine this problem? Have any idea what regulations are in place by hospitals to guard against the problem of “hungover surgeons”?

Wonder no more. Jon Stefanuca’s blog this past week, Hungover Surgeons: Watch Out! There’s Nothing Between You and Their Scalpel!,will tell you all you need to know. Jon queries: “Should hospitals regulate for patient safety?” What do you think? Share your comments.

A “Sneak Peak” of the week ahead

Some more good advice is on the way for parents of special needs children. We all know about what a wonderful aide dogs are for the blind. Mike Sanders will share what he’s learned how these canine wonders are being used for kids in need. Suffering from asthma or know someone who is? Jon Stefanuca will be sharing with  you some valuable information on this topic next week. A number of our clients or their now-deceased family members have suffered from this condition. Jon will share a story or two (without revealing protected confidential information) to bring to light just how this medical condition needs to be better recognized and treated by our health care providers before its too late. We all know what a difficult job nursing can be. That being said, Sarah Keogh will be telling us about some very concerning “trends” that are coming to light in this wonderful profession. Stay tuned for this important piece.

We’ll start next week off with a new blawg by our in-house medical specialist, Theresa Neumann. Her post on how important it can be to get a second opinion before you sign-up for a surgery, procedure or test is sitting in the queue just waiting to hit the pages of The Eye Opener – Views and Opinions from the Nash Community.

One Final Note: I wrote in last weekend’s Week In Review that we intended to post a new White Paper by Marian Hogan on a very important topic relating to Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA). It didn’t happen – because of “my Bad.” I fouled-up and sent the wrong draft of Marian’ s piece to our graphic designer. He did a wonderful job – as usual – of getting it ready – it just wasn’t the right version. The problem is fixed, but my mistake will delay the posting of this important White Paper for another week. Public apology: Sorry, Marian! We’ll make it right soon.


Week in Review (April 18 – 22, 2011) The Eye Opener Health and Law Blog

Saturday, April 23rd, 2011

From the Editor:

This past week, our blawgers (guess I’ll use this term now since we are legal bloggers) were busy on their keyboards once again. They covered a number of topics relating to law, medicine, health and patient safety. This week we posted a primer on aortic aneurysms and how they can present as back pain, a blog about “robot” anesthesiology, a disturbing post about how the recent threat of a federal government shutdown was averted but at a cost to those who are in dire need of healthcare, an interesting piece about laughing gas making its way back into the American medical scene for labor and delivery and finally, and a highly read piece on a not-to-often discussed topic but one of potential grave concern – shift switching by nurses and how this might impact patient safety.

Here’s our usual “quick summaries” for you to peruse, click on, read and comment:

Aneurysms – a deadly condition you need to know about!

Our in-house medical specialist, Theresa Neumann, wrote another highly educational and need-to-know piece about a condition that can present as back pain but which has deadly consequences for those who have this condition.

As Theresa’s research made us aware – “1 in every 50 males over the age of 55 have an abdominal aneurysm, this is a more common pathologic diagnosis than some others.  Men also corner the market at an 8-to-1 ratio as compared to women with abdominal aneurysms.”

As is the case with all of Theresa’s writings, we offer through her valuable information from someone who’s “been there” and “done that” in the clinical setting. Don’t miss her post entitled Aneurysms: A Potential Deadly Condition That May Present as Back Pain.

Who’s using remote control and a joy stick to put a breathing tube down your throat?

Mike Sanders brought to our attention a new practice of anesthesiologists – in Canada – that may soon be part of anesthesia management in the United States as well – using robotics to intubate patients. While you can certainly learn about the concept of intubation by reading Mike’s blog, basically, this is placing a small tube down a patient’s airway so that the anesthesiologist can control the airway and provide ventilation to a patient undergoing surgery.

Here’s an except -

Medical News Today is reporting that Dr. Thomas Hemmerling of McGill University and his team have developed a robotic system for intubation that can be operated via remote control.

For more on this fascinating new project by Dr. Hammerling and his team, read Mike’s post entitled Robot Anesthesiologists?

Government Shutdown Avoided – but who will pay the price for the “deals” that were cut?

The newest member of our blogging team, Jason Penn (fast approaching veteran blawger status) did a fascinating piece of the story-behind-the-story of the recent crisis our country faced when the federal government was on the verge of a shutdown. We all know about deals being cut in the back rooms of congress. We all know that the government avoided a shutdown this time around when the senate and house worked out a compromise that resulted in millions of dollars being earmarked for cuts in the budget.

Jason tells us what programs relating to healthcare will suffer as a result of these negotiated cuts. As some wise person once said, “why is it always those who are least represented who bear the burden of budget cuts?” Maybe it’s because they can’t afford lobbyists to protect them like those who need protection the least can.

Read Jason’s eye opening and no-punches-pulled report on just who will be the victims of the deals in his post of this past week Budget Crisis Avoided, But What About the Babies? Can They Live With $504 Million Less in Funding?

Will moms-to-be now be “laughing” their way through labor and delivery?

One of our seasoned blawgers, who every now and then is driven to report on the off-beat issues of law, medicine and healthcare, Jon Stefanuca, stepped up to the plate once again and took a swing at the return of an old-timer to the arsenal of pain relief for mothers-to-be undergoing labor and delivery – laughing gas!

As Jon’s piece in Eye Opener this past week tells us -

It appears that a number of hospitals are now considering making laughing gas available as a pain relief measure for women in labor. A hospital in San Francisco and another in Seattle have been using laughing gas in their labor and delivery units for a while. Hospitals like Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center plan to offer laughing gas to laboring mothers in the immediate future.

For more about this return of laughing gas to our obstetrical units, read Jon’s piece Laughing Gas Making Its Way Back Into the Labor and Delivery Department.

Nursing and Sleep Deprivation: Is it a risk factor for patient safety?

I suspect somewhere along the line you have done “an all-nighter” – whether it was getting ready for a big test, a social event, or for some other reason. Remember how you felt as you made it through that night or the next day? Have you ever done it several nights in the same week? How about doing it a few times one week and then do the same thing the next week and the next…. Well you no doubt get the idea. You’ve been exhausted, right? Well what about nurses, who have to do this for a living?

Nurses have lives too. They have children, home responsibilities and obligations, and some form of social life. What happens when they swap shifts or are asked to do “a double”?

Sarah Keogh was back blogging this past week and wrote a fascinating (and concerning) post entitled Nurses Switching Shifts: Does a Lack of Sleep Put Patients at Risk? We invite you to read Sarah’s piece and share your comments. Are you a nurse who lives this lifestyle? What are your thoughts about nurses being allowed to work multiple shifts or back-to-back shifts in terms of patient safety? Should there be restrictions on nurses’ shifts just as there (finally) are work restrictions on doctors-in-training?

A “Sneak Peak” of the week ahead

As part of our continuing effort to “get the word out there” on issues relating to health, medicine, patient safety and the law, we post from time to time more extensive research pieces called White Papers. Well, the time has arrived for another White Paper to be posted on our website. Marian Hogan has completed her piece on a very important topic – Patient Controlled Analgesia in today’s hospital environment. She examines how some hospitals are now heavily marketing a spa-like environment so you choose them over the competition. Yet lurking in the shadows of these facilities which promote flat screen TV’s, valet parking, in-room safes and the like is a very dangerous practice: placing patients on patient-controlled-analgesia (for pain relief) without vital monitoring devices and patient safety practices. It’s at the “printer” now; we hope to have it online this week.

From our blawgers you can expect reports on a disturbing fight between manufacturers and child safety experts over – blinds! After decades of controversy, you’ll find out where the battle lines are now drawn, who’s winning and who the real losers are in this war. Wonder how healthcare safety is doing since the report To Err is Human was published by the Institute of Medicine over a decade ago? Jason Penn will be providing an updated report card, which you should not miss. Alcohol and surgery – not a good combination! Jon Stefanuca plans on posting a piece that looks deeper in the obvious problems with this potentially deadly combination.

This is just a taste of what’s to come. I better wrap-up now. I’m working on finishing the third installment on Medical Technology and Patient Safety. Oh yeah, if time permits, I might even get to post a piece I’ve been working on this past week – a lawyer’s rant about our modern day love affair with mediation practices and trends.

As always, don’t forget - subscribe to the Eye Opener and tell your friends about us too! …and… don’t forget to join our social networking communities on Facebook and Twitter.

Hope you have a great weekend!

The Week in Review: did you miss last week’s posts on health, safety, medicine, law and healthcare?

Sunday, April 3rd, 2011

Last week we launched the first in a series called The Week in Review. We hope you enjoy this project as a way to catch-up on what  you may have missed in the world of health, medicine, patient safety, law and healthcare. Now for our second installment.

 

Yesterday is history. Tomorrow is a mystery. And today? Today is a gift. That’s why we call it the present.”

Inspirational  Quote from Babatunde Olatunji


 

We started the week with Part I in a series of posts intending to explore the issue of whether the ever-growing and expanding advances in medical technology are really accomplishing their goal – or what should be their goal: more efficient, effective and safe delivery of medical care.

The author, Brian Nash, poses the question, “What has technology done to improve healthcare?” Answering in part his own question, he states:

The answer, in short, is – some amazing things and some not so amazing things have taken place in terms of technological advances in healthcare. Unfortunately, as we will explore in this series, some of these technological advances have led to some catastrophic results for patients. One need look no further than how the medical institutions rushed to implement the newest, shiniest and “best” radiology machines and through their haste left in their wake scores of maimed and dead patients.

Read more – Medical Technology and Patient Safety: EMR’s, COW’s, iPads, etc – are they really doing the job?

 

Wednesday’s post by Sarah Keogh explored an often discussed but apparently not always heeded message about car seat safety. Sarah offers some “tips” and suggestions on how to implement simple safety steps to decrease the likelihood of injuries to children while in our cars. She reported -

A recent article on healthychildren.org says that deaths in motor vehicle crashes are still the leading cause of death for young children.

Don’t let this message go unheeded. These are not Sarah’s “tips and tricks” but those of experts in the field of child safety.

Read Sarah’s piece – 4 Tips for Car Seat Safety.

 

The end of last week brought an “interesting” piece by Mike Sanders, also a lawyer with our firm, concerning a so-called study suggesting a possible link between religious activity and obesity. This wasn’t – Mike is quick to point out – a “theory” of his. This was a posting he saw and just couldn’t stop himself from writing about.

While I am usually reluctant to belittle medical research, this study really has me scratching my head and asking, “Who cares?” Before anyone decides to skip church this weekend, let’s look at the details of the study.

Makes one wonder what it takes in today’s world of instant news, internet publishing and blog posting (hmmm), to “get published” as a study.

Read Mike’s piece entitled Can Religion Make You Fat?

The Week Ahead

This coming week will have among its postings Part II in the series about Medical Technology and whether it is doing its job of advancing the safe delivery of healthcare to our population. We’ll start with a topic that is near and dear to all in the healthcare industry – EMR’s – better known as Electronic Medical Records. Sounds like a good idea – right? Since we live in a world of computers, radio buttons and drop down boxes and way too many of us in the field of medical malpractice litigation have made too many visits to the eye doctor from having to reading hand-written medical charts – why wouldn’t this be the next best thing to sliced bread? Well – read Part II coming this week.

We also plan on posting some information and analysis of a medical/anesthesia procedure – the epidural – that thousands of women have every day of every week throughout this country and the world. Well, are they really as safe as some would have you believe? Stay tuned and read our upcoming post.

There are likely to be even more goodies on health, law, patient safety and healthcare in next week’s The Eye Opener from Nash & Associates.

 


New First-Of-Its-Kind Study: 70,000 Children Injured Annually by Medical Devices

Thursday, July 29th, 2010

A new first-time study of injuries suffered by children as a result of medical devices has produced some startling statistics. “More than 70,000 children and teens go to the emergency room each year for injuries and complications from medical devices,” according to an article in The Washington Post, which highlights a study just published by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Although the study points out that only 6% of all of these injuries required hospitalization, the fact remains that there is still a very large number of children that suffer injuries due to medical devices.  Some injuries are due to malfunction and misuse, while others are from very dangerous events, such as “puncture wounds from hypodermic needles breaking off in the skin while injecting medicine or illegal drugs”. According to the The Washington Post article:

The most serious problems involved implanted devices such as brain shunts for kids with hydrocephalus (water on the brain); chest catheters for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy at home; and insulin pumps for diabetics. Infections and overdoses are among problems associated with these devices.

In addition, the article touches on a recent trend that has come with medical advances: home health care, for such treatments and procedures which previously required longer and more extensive hospital stays:

Dr. Steven Krug, head of emergency medicine at Chicago’s Children’s Memorial Hospital, said the study highlights a trade-off linked with medical advances that have enabled chronically ill children to be treated at home and live more normal lives.

Home care can be challenging for families; Krug says he has seen children brought in because catheters were damaged or became infected.

“Health care providers need to be aware of these kids and their devices and how to recognize or diagnose” related problems, Krug said.

All of this being said, the article suggests that the Food and Drug Administration may soon become more involved, due to the nature and extent of these injuries to children:

The researchers are working to determine how and why the injuries occurred and also are examining the prevalence in adults. Those efforts might result in FDA device warnings, depending on what they find, said study co-author, Dr. Brock Hefflin.

Hefflin and lead author Dr. Cunlin Wang work in the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. They note there has been recent concern about medical device safety in children, particularly since many devices intended for adults are used in children.

We leave you with this conclusion, as stated by the American Academy of Pediatrics:

This study provides national estimates of pediatric medical device-associated adverse events resulting in emergency department visits and highlights the need to develop interventions to prevent pediatric device-related injuries.

Is this an adequate response?  What do you think?

The Hidden Dangers of Button Batteries

Wednesday, July 14th, 2010

Sunday evening, immediately after putting our two year old to bed, my wife and I watched 60 Minutes and settled in to begin to enjoy what we thought would be a ‘relaxing’ evening.  Unfortunately, one of the lead stories that the program featured involved the dangers of ‘button batteries’.  These batteries are especially dangerous to small children, because, as I learned from the show, the electrical current of the battery, once stuck in the esophagus, literally burns through the tissue surrounding it, causing holes in the esophagus.  They are also, unfortunately, very easy to get stuck in a child’s throat.

My mind starting racing; “OK, what products do we have in the house that are powered by button batteries?”  My concern was well-justified, as the vast majority of these tragic incidents occur to children under the age of four.  Scouring the internet this morning, I found several articles warning the parents of small children about dangers they should heed.  Sadly, I also saw blogs from the parents, in which they recount how they lost their child because of such a tragedy.  These products are not the subject of recalls, mind you.  These are batteries found in everyday products that you may have in your home.  The damage can be permanent and may effect your child’s ability to eat and drink permanently.

I found a warning on-line from the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), going all the way back to March of 1983, almost 30 years ago:

Technologic advances in electronic miniaturization have increased the availability of miniature (button) batteries in homes..in watches, calculators, cameras, hearing aids, and games. Although the vast majority of these button batteries, when accidentally swallowed, will pass through the person without any problem, occasional severe complications and even fatalities have been reported. Batteries may become lodged in the esophagus or intestine, slowly leaking alkaline electrolytes and causing an internal chemical burn.

Battery ingestions are preventable. Important prevention and treatment information is available based on preliminary results of a National Button Battery Ingestion Study conducted by Dr. Toby Litovitz, director of the National Capital Poison Center, of 62 button battery ingestions reported to the National Capital Poison Center in the past 9 months, 59% involved batteries that were left out loose rather than properly discarded or stored; 39% of the batteries were in the product they were intended for, and removed from the product. Half of these batteries were in hearing aids.

Fast forward to the present, and the warnings are all over the place.  In a recent article from examiner.com out of Baltimore, the urgency of getting the button battery out of the child as soon as possible is emphasized, due to how quickly damage can occur to the child’s throat:

The research also found there is only a two hour window to get the batteries out when lodged in the esophagus, which is less time than previously reported. Delayed removal can result in serious injuries such as tissue tears, burning, and internal bleeding .

Where can these batteries be found, and what can we do to help safeguard our children? A recent Reuters article provides us with some guidance:

They warn parents to keep not only loose batteries out of children’s reach, but also the household products that contain the batteries. In about 62 percent of cases where a young child swallowed a button battery, the child fished the battery out of a household item.

For an additional barrier, the researchers advise parents to place strong tape over the battery compartment of all household products.

They urge extra caution with any 20-mm lithium cell batteries, which can be recognized by their imprint codes — usually CR2032, CR2025 or CR2016.

On a final note, another danger is that doctors sometimes misdiagnose the injury, as the symptoms can be non-specific at times:

The current study found that in the majority of fatal or severe injuries, no one had seen the child swallow the battery. And because the symptoms of poisoning are non-specific — such as fever, vomiting, poor appetite and lethargy — doctors often initially misdiagnosed the problem.

Of course, the key is not to let your child get a hold of these ‘button batteries’ to begin with.  We strongly urge you to check your homes for these products and to take the appropriate steps to safeguard your family.  We are also again providing the link for the CPSC, as we have previously done so many times in our website‘s blog, for additional follow-up information.



Deaths of Infants in Cars Increasing with Summer Heat; Important Safety Reminders!

Monday, June 28th, 2010

The Associated Press (AP) has just posted a troubling article, one that should grab the attention of every parent who has a child that uses a car seat.

Unfortunately, with the summer comes the heat.  Already this season, we are seeing high temperatures that are matching or breaking records in the Mid-Atlantic Region.  It is with this in mind that we share excerpts from the AP article that we want you to remember, especially when transporting the ‘precious cargo’ that sometimes falls asleep in the back seat of a car:

Safety groups such as Kids and Cars and Safe Kids USA urge parents to check the back seat every time they exit the vehicle and to create a reminder system for themselves.

Some parents leave their cell phone or purse on the floor near the car seat to ensure they retrieve it along with the child. Others remind themselves by placing a stuffed animal in the car seat when the child isn’t using the seat and putting the toy in the front seat when the child is tucked in the car seat.

Unfortunately, not all parents are using these and other simple measures, to remember to never leave a child unattended in a vehicle.  Accidents happen, yes; unfortunately, these accidents can turn deadly when a child is trapped in a car in the intense heat.  As the following tragic scenario illustrates, the temperature in the car in this devastating loss was not survivable:

In Portageville, Mo., 2-year-old twins Allannah and Alliya Larry were found dead in their grandmother’s car on June 16 as temperatures pushed into the mid-90s. New Madrid County Sheriff Terry Stevens said the children apparently got into the unlocked car on their own and were locked inside the vehicle for two hours.

When investigators arrived, he said, the temperatures inside the car had surpassed 140 degrees.

The number of heat-related deaths of children in cars is dramatically increasing, so much so that “the government’s highway safety agency issued a consumer advisory this week that included a warning for parents not to leave children unattended in or near a vehicle.”

We leave you with these sobering statistics, including research done by Jan Null, an adjunct professor of meteorology at San Francisco State University:

The spate of deaths in June has caught the attention of safety advocates because July tends to be the most deadly month for children trapped in hot cars. With a week left in June, the number of deaths has already surpassed the previous record of 17 fatalities from January to June 2009, according to Null’s data.

In 2005, when Null counted a record 47 child hyperthermia fatalities, only 12 of the deaths occurred through the end of June.

Since 1998, Null has documented 463 child deaths involving heat exhaustion inside cars and trucks. Safety advocates said the deaths have been more prevalent since the mid-1990s when parent-drivers were required to put their children in the back seat, where they are safer in transit but more likely to be forgotten.

Please take precautions to make sure that you do not leave any child in your vehicle unattended for any length of time.

Child Safety Tips: As mercury goes up, so do safety risks for kids!

Wednesday, June 2nd, 2010

By picpoke.com

Yes, it is really getting hot out there this week!!!  Coming from Florida to DC last year, I thought “OK, so it will not get nearly as hot up here, or at least not as early in the summer.”  Yes, I was wrong.  This thought brought me to thinking about some of the fun things to do in the summer, but also the dangers for our little ones during this time if we are not extra careful.  Lo and behold, I found this article today, courtesy of the Dallas Morning News and reprinted by the Kansas City Star:

Emergency-room professionals have their own name for the long, lovely, lazy days that kids look forward to in summer: trauma season. Because that’s when hospitals see a spike in drownings and heat-related accidents.

The article discusses several myths and related facts associated with those myths.  Here are a few samples from the article:

MYTH: Pool parties are safe as long as adults are around.

FACT: Many drownings happen when adults are close by. The problem is too much commotion. The key is to have a designated adult watching the water because that is where the danger is. The pool should be free of excess toys that can block the view of the water.

MYTH: Floaties keep little ones safe in the water.

FACT: Floaties are designed for fun, not safety. They give a false sense of security, can deflate and can slip off.

MYTH: The kids will be fine in the pool for the short time it takes to answer the phone or get a cold drink.

FACT: In a minute, a child can go under water. In two or three minutes, the child can lose consciousness. In four or five, the child could suffer irreversible brain damage or die. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, drowning is the second-leading cause of unintentional, injury-related death for children 1 to 14 years old, second only to car and transportation-related accidents.

The article states several other myths and facts, which include the hazards of leaving children unattended in cars and car seats, as well as sun exposure and dehydration.  We encourage you to read the article in its entirety.  Let’s all have a safe summer out there, please!!

Consuming Interests: 1.5 million Graco strollers recalled due to fingertip amputations, lacerations

Monday, February 8th, 2010

Let’s start off with a quote from The Baltimore Sun report on strollers that carry the risk of your child’s fingers being amputated.

Families that own Graco Passage, Alano and Spree strollers and travel systems should stop using them until they receive a free protective cover kit from the company, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

Graco issued the voluntary stroller recall after receiving seven reports of children hurting their fingers in the canopy hinge, resulting in five fingertip amputations and two lacerations, the CPSC has announced.

About 1.5 million of these strollers and travel systems have been sold at stores like Burlington Coat Factory, Babies “R” Us, Toys “R” Us, Kmart, Sears, Target, Walmart between October 2004 and December.

But not all of these models have the offending hinge — be sure to check your model number on the CPSC site and compare your canopy hinge to the photos above to determine whether yours is affected.

Cribs, strollers, bracelets, jackets – you name it – there’s probably a recall.  For parents concerned -as I’m sure you all are – about what products for children are out there that pose safety risks, we suggest you check out the list on the Consumer Product Safety Commission website.

You can also follow them on Twitter.  Just type in U.S. CPSC and then do the drop-down to follow them.

Why wait until you read it – possibly too late – in a newspaper account of some other horrible tragedy involving a child.

Did you know that 210,000 children’s jackets with drawstrings manufactured by GTM Sportswear Inc., of Manhattan, Kansas were recalled?

How about children’s greeting cards with bracelets – called Papyrus Brand Greeting Cards with bracelets?  174,000 of them were recalled because they were found to be in violation of the lead paint standard.

Did you know that just under 10,000 toy guns (called Special Forces and Police SWAT Toy Gun Sets) were recalled because the orange tips located at the end of the toy guns’ barrels, which are designed to distinguish them from real guns, can easily be removed from the barrels, posing a choking hazard to children.

You get the point no doubt.

The information on dangers to your children and recalls by the CPSC is all out there.  Even if you don’t ‘do’ Facebook or tweet, check out the CPSC website.  If you’re a blogger, check out their blog page – OnSafety.  Like RSS feeds – that’s there for you as well – just click on one of these links and make your RSS feed connection.

An informed consumer is also a safety-conscious parent.