Posts Tagged ‘children's safety’

Service dogs in school — a fresh look

Friday, July 22nd, 2011
Service Dog and Boy

service dogs

A while back I wrote a piece on the topic of service dogs for kids and mentioned the use of service dogs in schools. A regular reader of our blog then wrote in with a number of comments and questions about the propriety of dogs in schools. To help answer her questions, I recently spoke with Nancy Fierer, who is the Director at Susquehanna Service Dogs in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, which is an organization that trains and places service dogs. Susquehanna is the organization that placed two of the dogs mentioned in this NPR story.

The ADA and dogs in school

I also did a little more research on the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) and its impact on the issue. The ADA requires that all public facilities allow a disabled person and his or her service dog (not pets) to enter the premises just the same as a non-disabled person. So is a school considered a public facility? It’s an interesting question. On the one hand it is accessible to the public in the sense that parents and students can freely enter a school. However, if you’re not the parent of a child at the school, can you just walk into a school and roam the halls like you might roam around a mall? I think if you tried that, you would get stopped pretty quickly and asked to leave if you had no valid business there. However, the law appears to be settled that schools are considered public facilities at least for those areas that are open to the public such as administrative offices, gymnasiums during sporting events, and auditoriums during public events. Therefore, schools must be accessible to service dogs in these public areas. For class rooms, however, it’s not so clear. While the law appears to favor allowing service dogs in class rooms, it is being decided on a case-by-case basis because there are other considerations as well – the age of the child, the disability at issue, the ability to control the dog, etc.

How much school assistance is necessary?

I have to admit that when I first wrote on this topic, I had envisioned that the dog and child were a self-contained unit that required little in the way of adult assistance. Ms. Fierer indicated that that is usually not the case. Depending on the age of the child and the level of disability, the child may be able to care for the dog independently. However, in most instances an adult (teacher’s aide or nurse perhaps) is required to pitch in with help giving the dog water and taking it out for bathroom breaks. Ms. Fierer indicated that the dog does need water breaks during the day (feeding can be done at home before and after school). This is usually accomplished by keeping a water bowl in a nearby room – perhaps a nurse’s office or a counselor’s office. Several times a day, either the child (if he/she is old enough) or an adult can take the dog for a drink. The same is true for bathroom breaks (pee only; No. 2 is usually taken care of at home). Again, service dogs do require assistance from the school but from what Ms. Fierer told me, the disruption is fairly minimal and can be worked out with proper planning.

Controlling a service dog

A larger issue is the child’s ability to control the dog. Even though service dogs are highly trained, the owner (in this case a child) must still be able to control the dog before being permitted to take a dog into school. These include such basic commands as making the dog sit, stay, come, leave it, and walk on loose leash. These are some of the common commands that all service dogs must know. In addition, a service dog also receives additional training in a particular disability and learns specific commands unique to that disability, e.g., retrieving specific items, pulling a wheelchair, responding to seizures, search and rescue. These commands must be mastered as well. For example, if an autistic child is in need of the dog to put its head in the child’s lap to help calm him/her down, the child (or a trained adult) has to be able to give the dog that command. If the child cannot give that command to the dog, then it undermines the usefulness of the dog in school.

Because of the demands that service dogs place on the child, very young children usually do not take dogs to school unescorted. Ms. Fierer said she would be surprised to see a six-year-old, for example, taking a dog to school alone. Older children can, with proper training, be permitted to take a dog to school alone. To ensure that the child is capable of caring for the dog, Susquehanna utilizes the Assistance Dogs International Public Access Test. This test requires the owner and the dog to perform multiple tests in a variety of settings to ensure that the dog is well-trained and that the owner can properly control the dog. For children, Ms. Fierer indicated that the testing is usually administered with the parent and child because she uses the team approach – the parent, child and dog are a team. For a child taking the dog to school, however, the parent is usually not there so the child must be able to control the dog independently. Only when a child is adept at controlling the dog should the child be permitted to take the dog to school. Even then, parents have to work closely with the child’s teacher and other school staff to coordinate the details of how the dog will be cared for.

Other concerns

Our reader also asked questions about whether service dogs are a distraction in school and whether they can pose a danger to other children. After talking to Ms. Fierer, it’s my opinion that these are not major concerns. As for being a distraction, Ms. Fierer said that is usually not the case. Service dogs are generally introduced into the school gradually, starting with maybe a half-hour per day and building from there. The children get accustomed to the dog and the novelty soon wears off. Also, the other children need to be educated that this is a service dog and not a pet to be played with. Children can easily learn this lesson. As for being a danger to other children, Ms. Fierer said she has never heard of a dangerous incident happening at school such as a dog biting a child. These dogs are amazingly well-trained and the trainers allow zero tolerance for aggressive behavior. If a dog shows any aggression, that dog does not make the cut for being a service dog. Therefore, I don’t believe this concern is a valid reason for denying a child a service dog.

Training a service dog

In terms of the actual training given to the dogs, Ms. Fierer said that when a puppy is eight weeks old, it starts living with a dedicated puppy handler who is responsible for teaching the dog basic manners.  This time includes classes at Susquehanna twice per month.  This arrangement goes on till the dog is 18 months old, at which time the dog receives about six months of intense training.  About 50-60 percent of training is the same for all service dogs. The rest is devoted to the unique needs of each disability. Before a dog is placed, Susquehanna spends about 2 and ½ weeks training the family that is receiving the dog. Even after placement, Susquehanna continues to do follow-up training – at first on a weekly basis and then gradually declining over the next six months. It even does annual re-testing.

I hope this follow-up addresses our readers’ concerns. Ms. Fierer emphasized that service dogs are not the solution for every child. Susquehanna actually does therapy sessions with families before even agreeing to place a dog to ensure that the dog and the family are a good fit. She indicated that it is a big responsibility to own a service dog and it is not a decision that is made lightly by the dog trainers. However, for the right child and the right family, a service dog can be an amazing asset.

Related Nash and Associates Links:

Service Dogs for Kids

 

photo from servicedogtraining.wordpress.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Children’s Medications: Coming Changes and Tips to Avoid Overdose

Tuesday, May 24th, 2011

We all know that a little over-the-counter (OTC) pain medication can be just what the doctor ordered for minor aches, pains or to help combat the symptoms of a nasty flu. Most adults, however, also realize that medications can be dangerous. No, I am not talking about the blast from the past news stories about medications that have been tampered with (…though it is weird that the Unabomber, Ted Kaczynski, is back in the news as one possible suspect in the Tylenol poisonings that killed people in the Chicago area in 1982). My focus today is on the danger involved with overdoses of commonly used pain medication. In particular, the risk of accidentally overdosing children on OTC pain relievers such as Tylenol.

Image from www.tylenol.com

There has been quite a bit of focus recently on the possible changes to Tylenol and other acetaminophen containing drugs for children. These are not formula changes and they have nothing to do with the myriad of Tylenol recalls over the past couple of years. Currently, the basic concern is that overdoses of this common medication accounts for a fairly sizeable number of poisoning cases, which can be very serious since overdose can cause liver damage to children. An AP article reports that:

Dosing errors with children’s acetaminophen products accounted for 2.8 percent, or 7,500, of the 270,165 emergencies reported to poison centers last year, according to the American Association of Poison Control Centers.

Overdoses can be caused by parents not reading the label, misinterpreting the dosing instructions or using a spoon or other container instead of the cup included with the product.

These overdose situations most often occur in children under 2 years old.

Chart provided on www.tylenol.com

When I read this, I was not surprised. Currently acetaminophen for children, Tylenol and other brands, come in two different concentrations.  Most commonly one is labeled “Children’s” and the other “Infant’s.” Each of these medications include on the outside packaging a confusing little matrix that details the correct dosage for a child of a particular age or weight range. The correct dosing for your child’s age and weight may not be the same if you have a child that is particularly large or small for their age. Additionally, if you have both children’s and infant’s acetaminophen products in your home, you must be careful to provide the correct dosing for the correct concentration. This does not even get into the differences in dosing between the liquid medicine and the tablets. Finally, the box does not provide dosing information for children less than two years of age. The dosing instruction for children under 24 months is “ask your doctor.” So, how many of you are going to make that phone call?

The harsh realities of parenting and sick kids

My children are both young; the youngest is now a little past her second birthday. In the last few years, we have had both infant and children medication in the house, liquid and tablets, and I have been very careful to make sure to double-check myself if I ever have to medicate either child to make sure that I am reading the correct dosing matrix for the correct concentration and for the correct child. More often than not, I have found that children need medication when their parents are tired. As parents know – children frequently get sick in the middle of the night and when children in the house are sick nobody in the household sleeps well. I always try to take this into account to avoid dosing errors. However, this can be confusing particularly when children are little.

When my children were very little, I used to ask the doctor at each appointment what would be the correct Tylenol dose for their current weight. I did not foresee having to use that information, but I wanted to make sure that I knew the correct amount in case I was caught with a sick child in the middle of the night. If it had been a while since my child was weighed, I would sometimes have to call for dosing information. Additionally, I found that it was nearly impossible to dose a child properly using the little cups included with the medication. However, the medicine packaging clearly states that you are only to dose using the enclosed cup. I found that my ability to dose the correct amount of medication was much improved when I used a syringe style dropper.

The FDA steps in – finally!

Well, apparently, I have not been alone in my concerns. The FDA panel that met last week, has made some recommendations that may improve some of these problems in the future and lessen the chances that children will receive too much medication. According to the AP article, the following recommendations have been voted on and will be recommended to the FDA:

  • Dosing instructions should be added for children younger than 2 years old
  • Dosing instructions should be provided based on a child’s weight (rather than the focus being on a child’s age)
  • Limiting cup measurements to milliliters  (rather than both teaspoons and milliliters…one of many things that make the current measurement cups confusing)
  • Mandating a single dosage for children’s solid acetaminophen tablets

Infant Tylenol (and other acetaminophen products) a thing of the past

Relatedly, the article mentioned that the Consumer Healthcare Products Association, which includes the makers of Tylenol and many other acetaminophen producers, agreed to voluntarily stop producing infant drops. This decision means that a day may be coming soon when there would only be one concentration available of children’s acetaminophen.

Some tips and tricks to avoid overdosing your child

If infant acetaminophen is eliminated and children’s acetaminophen is sold with the changed dosing instructions, I think that parents and other caregivers will find it much easier to provide children with the correct amount of medication. However, I would still recommend taking the following steps to protect your children:

  • Keep all medications, including children’s acetaminophen, in a locked closet or other locked secure location away from children.
  • Do not forget to re-secure medication, even when children are sick, so that children are not accidentally able to overdose (when using medicine frequently the temptation to leave it accessible should not overcome the safety element of keeping it away from little hands).
  • Keep a list of the current weight of each child in the house available with the medications so that a caregiver (or tired parent) knows the weight of each child to be able to refer to the dosing chart when needed.
  • Use a clearly marked cup or syringe that is specifically for medicine to dose your child – do not use a household spoon or other imprecise measuring tool.
  • If in doubt on dosing, call the pediatrician to be sure – do not guess!
  • When multiple people will be caring for a sick child (or if you are tired), make sure that you note down the time of each dose of medication to ensure proper timing between doses to avoid accidental overdose.
  • Read the ingredients on any medication carefully to ensure that you do not give your child multiple medications containing the same ingredient – acetaminophen is sometimes added to other medications in combination drugs.

The best advice

Obviously, since I am not a doctor, you should check with your pediatrician if you have any questions about what the correct method is for providing medication to your child, but these tips will hopefully help eliminate some of the more common medication errors in your home.

Your take?

Do you have other tips to share? What about the recommended changes, do you think that additional changes are needed? Do you use fever-reducing medications in your child if your child is not displaying other symptoms, or do you allow the fever to do its work its way out?

Cyber-bullying: With digital age comes digital crime

Friday, November 12th, 2010

Update (Brian Nash): This morning, May 23, 2011, I saw a tweet linking to news that First Lady, Michelle Obama, is joining Maryland’s Judge O’Malley and Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown in a visit this week to a local Maryland school, Central Middle School in Edgewater, to get the word out on an anti-bullying campaign.

Great work and an important message that needs to keep being delivered! The President and First Lady are using Facebook to get their anti-bullying message out there as well.

Wanting to do my (little) part in getting this message out there, I thought I’d re-post this blog from last November for those who may have missed it on the first time. Spread the word; let’s give a hand to all who work so hard to rid society of this dangerous blight.

Original Post:

Digital media is everywhere, and social networking is totally “in” among our youth as well as adults.  As with every advancement in technology, one is faced with the new problems that accompany that technology. With the advent of personal computers, “hacking” became the big cyber-crime followed by sexual predation.  There have been a multitude of movies in which the plots focus on computer-hacking or on-line dating, and there are plenty of songs referencing cell phones and on-line technology.

We are in the digital age, and with that we are experiencing new and more ominous digital crime that is involving our youth and resulting in the premature death of beloved children.

October, 2006, Megan Meier (age 14) committed suicide after being bullied on MySpace by a supposed friend and the friend’s mother.  In June of 2008, Tomohiro Kato rented a truck and drove into the crowded “geek district” of Tokyo where he proceeded to stab 17 unknown people, killing 7 and injuring 10, because he was being harassed on-line for his ideas and electronic postings on social websites.  This year, beginning in January, a beautiful 15 year-old Irish immigrant, Phoebe Prince, committed suicide after being blatantly harassed by her peers, both outwardly in school and on-line, in Massachusettes.  Two months later, on March 21, 2010, Alexis Pilkington (17yrs) committed suicide after being harassed on a social networking site; she was a good student and soccer “star” in Long Island who had received a college scholarship for soccer.  On September 9, 2010, Billy Lucas, a 15-year-old Indiana student, committed suicide after being blatantly harassed on-line and in school for presumed homosexuality.  The most recent case involved a Rutgers University student, Tyler Clementi (18yrs); he committed suicide after his college roommate illegally videotaped a homosexual encounter and posted it on the internet.  These are a few of the more publicized cases, but, cyber-bullying is much more pervasive in our youth.

Each of these cases represents an unnecessary loss of life prompted by children or young adults, facilitated by the use of digital technology.  The hatefulness and utter meanness of the offending children is astounding.  Bullying has been around for ages, and unfortunately, it is part of human nature, evolution and survival of the fittest.  The problem has become the pervasiveness of digital media in our lives, the anonymnity allowed by it and the ease and speed of which information can be disseminated world-wide.  It used to be that the bullying could be left on the playground at school, and/or that school administrators were more apt to intervene if approached with the problem; neither of these conditions seem to exist anymore.  Compound these issues with the virtual isolation these digital media promote, the often-times dysfunctional family unit (divorce, re-marriage, single-parenting, and even the need for both parents to work full-time), the relative independence of our youth, and the relative insensitivity of our youth to violence and sexually explicit material.

Steve Williams posted an article about Billy Lucas’ death on the organization, Care 2 Make a Difference (www.care2.com) which sited the following statistics related to suicide from the Trevor Project:

  • In the United States, more than 34,000 people die by suicide each year (2007 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC).
  • Suicide is the third leading cause of death among 15 to 24-year-olds, accounting for over 12% of deaths in this age group; only accidents and homicide occur more frequently (2006 National Adolescent Health Information).
  • Suicide is the second leading cause of death on college campuses (2008 CDC).
  • For every completed suicide by a young person, it is estimated that 100 to 200 attempts are made (2003 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey).
  • Lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth are up to four times more likely to attempt suicide than their heterosexual peers (Massachusetts 2007 Youth Risk Survey).
  • More than 1/3 of LGB youth report having made a suicide attempt (D’Augelli AR - Clinical Child Psychiatry and Psychology 2002)
  • Nearly half of young transgender people have seriously thought about taking their lives and one quarter report having made a suicide attempt (Grossman AH, D’Augelli AR - Suicide and Life Threatening Behavior2007)
  • Questioning youth who are less certain of their sexual orientation report even higher levels of substance abuse and depressed thoughts than their heterosexual or openly LGBT-identified peers (Poteat VP, Aragon SR, et al – Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology2009)

Children in this age group, despite their outward mature appearance in today’s world, remain emotionally and intellectually immature.  The teenage human body goes through enormous hormonal changes during this period which compounds emotional lability.  The onslaught of hurtful and demoralizing comments, whether by text-messaging, emails, or social networking sites, can be quite devastating to one’s sense of self and integrity.  The speed at which such information, whether true or false, can disseminate and build momentum amongst peer groups can become overwhelming for the immature psyche, while suggestions to “kill yourself” or threats of murderous intent might just push that individual “over the edge”.

Just last week, Medscape posted an interview with  Gwenn Schurgin O’Keeffe, MD, FAAP, (a pediatrician, health journalist, chief executive officer of Pediatrics Now (www.pediatricsnow.com), an online health and communications company, and the author of Cybersafe: Protecting and Empowering Digital Kids in the World of Texting, Gaming and Social Media ). In the interview, Dr. O’Keeffe defined cyber-bullying, offering suggestions for parents and even medical health providers for monitoring child behaviors and usage of these digital medias, as well as the effects on the individual’s psyche.  Legislation is being discussed on ways to punish these crimes, but the first-line protection begins in the home.  The Massachusettes Attorney General’s Office also displays a page on its website devoted to the topic; it is unclear whether this appeared before or after the Phoebe Prince tragedy, but it is there nonetheless.  One can only hope that changes can be made before those suicide statistics increase exponentially.

I leave you with one of my childhood teachings that I only wish was held in high regard in today’s society:  ”If you cannot say anything nice, then don’t say anything at all.”

Related Post (update):

I also came across a post entitled Stopping Cyberbullying: Who’s Responsible? – Interesting read!

Credit to news.cnet.com for photo

New First-Of-Its-Kind Study: 70,000 Children Injured Annually by Medical Devices

Thursday, July 29th, 2010

A new first-time study of injuries suffered by children as a result of medical devices has produced some startling statistics. “More than 70,000 children and teens go to the emergency room each year for injuries and complications from medical devices,” according to an article in The Washington Post, which highlights a study just published by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Although the study points out that only 6% of all of these injuries required hospitalization, the fact remains that there is still a very large number of children that suffer injuries due to medical devices.  Some injuries are due to malfunction and misuse, while others are from very dangerous events, such as “puncture wounds from hypodermic needles breaking off in the skin while injecting medicine or illegal drugs”. According to the The Washington Post article:

The most serious problems involved implanted devices such as brain shunts for kids with hydrocephalus (water on the brain); chest catheters for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy at home; and insulin pumps for diabetics. Infections and overdoses are among problems associated with these devices.

In addition, the article touches on a recent trend that has come with medical advances: home health care, for such treatments and procedures which previously required longer and more extensive hospital stays:

Dr. Steven Krug, head of emergency medicine at Chicago’s Children’s Memorial Hospital, said the study highlights a trade-off linked with medical advances that have enabled chronically ill children to be treated at home and live more normal lives.

Home care can be challenging for families; Krug says he has seen children brought in because catheters were damaged or became infected.

“Health care providers need to be aware of these kids and their devices and how to recognize or diagnose” related problems, Krug said.

All of this being said, the article suggests that the Food and Drug Administration may soon become more involved, due to the nature and extent of these injuries to children:

The researchers are working to determine how and why the injuries occurred and also are examining the prevalence in adults. Those efforts might result in FDA device warnings, depending on what they find, said study co-author, Dr. Brock Hefflin.

Hefflin and lead author Dr. Cunlin Wang work in the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. They note there has been recent concern about medical device safety in children, particularly since many devices intended for adults are used in children.

We leave you with this conclusion, as stated by the American Academy of Pediatrics:

This study provides national estimates of pediatric medical device-associated adverse events resulting in emergency department visits and highlights the need to develop interventions to prevent pediatric device-related injuries.

Is this an adequate response?  What do you think?

Deaths of Infants in Cars Increasing with Summer Heat; Important Safety Reminders!

Monday, June 28th, 2010

The Associated Press (AP) has just posted a troubling article, one that should grab the attention of every parent who has a child that uses a car seat.

Unfortunately, with the summer comes the heat.  Already this season, we are seeing high temperatures that are matching or breaking records in the Mid-Atlantic Region.  It is with this in mind that we share excerpts from the AP article that we want you to remember, especially when transporting the ‘precious cargo’ that sometimes falls asleep in the back seat of a car:

Safety groups such as Kids and Cars and Safe Kids USA urge parents to check the back seat every time they exit the vehicle and to create a reminder system for themselves.

Some parents leave their cell phone or purse on the floor near the car seat to ensure they retrieve it along with the child. Others remind themselves by placing a stuffed animal in the car seat when the child isn’t using the seat and putting the toy in the front seat when the child is tucked in the car seat.

Unfortunately, not all parents are using these and other simple measures, to remember to never leave a child unattended in a vehicle.  Accidents happen, yes; unfortunately, these accidents can turn deadly when a child is trapped in a car in the intense heat.  As the following tragic scenario illustrates, the temperature in the car in this devastating loss was not survivable:

In Portageville, Mo., 2-year-old twins Allannah and Alliya Larry were found dead in their grandmother’s car on June 16 as temperatures pushed into the mid-90s. New Madrid County Sheriff Terry Stevens said the children apparently got into the unlocked car on their own and were locked inside the vehicle for two hours.

When investigators arrived, he said, the temperatures inside the car had surpassed 140 degrees.

The number of heat-related deaths of children in cars is dramatically increasing, so much so that “the government’s highway safety agency issued a consumer advisory this week that included a warning for parents not to leave children unattended in or near a vehicle.”

We leave you with these sobering statistics, including research done by Jan Null, an adjunct professor of meteorology at San Francisco State University:

The spate of deaths in June has caught the attention of safety advocates because July tends to be the most deadly month for children trapped in hot cars. With a week left in June, the number of deaths has already surpassed the previous record of 17 fatalities from January to June 2009, according to Null’s data.

In 2005, when Null counted a record 47 child hyperthermia fatalities, only 12 of the deaths occurred through the end of June.

Since 1998, Null has documented 463 child deaths involving heat exhaustion inside cars and trucks. Safety advocates said the deaths have been more prevalent since the mid-1990s when parent-drivers were required to put their children in the back seat, where they are safer in transit but more likely to be forgotten.

Please take precautions to make sure that you do not leave any child in your vehicle unattended for any length of time.

Child Safety Tips: As mercury goes up, so do safety risks for kids!

Wednesday, June 2nd, 2010

By picpoke.com

Yes, it is really getting hot out there this week!!!  Coming from Florida to DC last year, I thought “OK, so it will not get nearly as hot up here, or at least not as early in the summer.”  Yes, I was wrong.  This thought brought me to thinking about some of the fun things to do in the summer, but also the dangers for our little ones during this time if we are not extra careful.  Lo and behold, I found this article today, courtesy of the Dallas Morning News and reprinted by the Kansas City Star:

Emergency-room professionals have their own name for the long, lovely, lazy days that kids look forward to in summer: trauma season. Because that’s when hospitals see a spike in drownings and heat-related accidents.

The article discusses several myths and related facts associated with those myths.  Here are a few samples from the article:

MYTH: Pool parties are safe as long as adults are around.

FACT: Many drownings happen when adults are close by. The problem is too much commotion. The key is to have a designated adult watching the water because that is where the danger is. The pool should be free of excess toys that can block the view of the water.

MYTH: Floaties keep little ones safe in the water.

FACT: Floaties are designed for fun, not safety. They give a false sense of security, can deflate and can slip off.

MYTH: The kids will be fine in the pool for the short time it takes to answer the phone or get a cold drink.

FACT: In a minute, a child can go under water. In two or three minutes, the child can lose consciousness. In four or five, the child could suffer irreversible brain damage or die. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, drowning is the second-leading cause of unintentional, injury-related death for children 1 to 14 years old, second only to car and transportation-related accidents.

The article states several other myths and facts, which include the hazards of leaving children unattended in cars and car seats, as well as sun exposure and dehydration.  We encourage you to read the article in its entirety.  Let’s all have a safe summer out there, please!!

McNeil Consumer Healthcare Announces Voluntary Recall of Certain OTC Infants’ and Children's Products

Saturday, May 8th, 2010

Last week, the FDA and McNeil Consumer Healthcare launched a massive voluntary recall of certain medications for infants and children.  There is a dedicated McNeil website that addresses the recalls.  In addition, the FDA has published a press release that has some of the important information regarding the recall

The following is some basic information concerning the recall, as published by McNeil under the Product Recall Information:

McNeil Consumer Healthcare is initiating this voluntary recall because some of these products may not meet required quality standards. This recall is not being undertaken on the basis of adverse medical events. However, as a precautionary measure, parents and caregivers should not administer these products to their children. Some of the products included in the recall may contain a higher concentration of active ingredient than is specified; others may contain inactive ingredients that may not meet internal testing requirements; and others may contain tiny particles. While the potential for serious medical events is remote, the company advises consumers who have purchased these recalled products to discontinue use.

The investigation into these products, which include, but are not limited to, Infants’ and Children’s Tylenol and Motrin (Please click here for a complete listing) is ongoing.  The Commissioner of Food and Drugs, Dr. Margaret A. Hamburg, states:  ”While the potential for serious health problems is remote, Americans deserve medications that are safe, effective and of the highest quality. We are investigating the products and facilities associated with this recall and will provide updates as we learn more.”

We will continue to monitor this massive recall.  Please immediately check your homes for the recalled products. We strongly recommend that you read and follow the FDA’s instructions.

Consumer Product Safety Commission vows to crack down on defective cribs – washingtonpost.com

Monday, February 22nd, 2010

An announcement last week by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) will hopefully prevent future catastrophic injuries and deaths of infants from crib defects, through tougher federal legislation regarding cribs.  The chairman of the organization, Inez Tenenbaum, made a powerful statement in a recent Washington Post Article in this regard:

While we are on the subject of cribs, I have a message for manufacturers, a message that actually applies to makers of any consumer product,” Tenenbaum said. “I say no more to the tired tactic of blaming parents in the press when CPSC announces a recall that involves a death. Take responsibility and show respect to the grieving family, yes, even if they are pursuing litigation. Those who tread into this arena when CPSC has found your product to be defective will be called out.

The article also details the number and type of crib recalls to date by the CPSC:  

The CPSC has recalled more than 6 million cribs since September 2007, many due to failures related to drop sides, hardware and wooden slats. Consumer advocates and health professionals have long complained that federal safety requirements governing cribs do not address the durability of drop-sides on cribs and related hardware, as well as wood strength and quality and other issues.

Let’s hope that these actions send a powerful message to crib manufacturers and retailers alike, to put safety first, especially when it comes to our little ones.  What could be more important?  We will monitor developments within this and other related recalls.

Contributor: Rodd Santomauro