Posts Tagged ‘D.C.’

DC Hospitals Step It Up During Prostate Cancer Awareness Month – FREE Resources You Need to Know About

Wednesday, September 7th, 2011

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. To raise awareness about prostate cancer, hospitals in Washington, D.C. are stepping-up this September for a good cause indeed.  Did you know that an estimated 240,890 new cases of prostate cancer will be reported this year? About 33,720 men will die this year alone from prostate cancer. About 1 in 6 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during their lifetime.

Although prostate cancer is the most common cancer in American men, the good news is that the survival rate is quite high for patients who are diagnosed and treated early.  If you are a man, a key to your survival is to be familiar with the signs and symptoms of prostate cancer and to seek regular screening.

This year, Georgetown University Hospital will recognize Prostate Cancer Awareness Month by offering men free prostate cancer screening.

Who should get screened?

-          Men over the age of 35 – particularly African-American or Hispanic men over the age of 35

-          Men with a family history of prostate cancer

If you meet the above criteria, don’t miss out on this opportunity. Free screening will be offered on Saturday, September 17, 2011 from 8:00a.m. to 12:00p.m. in the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. Free parking will be available in the Leavey Center garage.  The Georgetown University Hospital is located at 3800 Reservoir Rd. NW, Washington, D.C., 20007. “The screening will consist of blood testing to determine PSA (prostate specific antigen) level, total cholesterol, and a digital rectal exam (DRE) to be performed by physicians.”

If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with prostate cancer, you might want to contact the Providence Hospital prostate cancer support group.  This group is specifically dedicated to helping patients live and cope with prostate cancer. Brothers Prostate Cancer Support Group meets every 4th Tuesday between 6:30p.m. and 8:30 p.m. at Providence Hospital’s Wellness Institute (1150 Varnum St. NE, 3rd Floor, Washington, D.C 20017).  For more information, please call 202-269-7795.

Please share this information with your friends, fans, and readers. For more information about cancer support groups in the D.C. area, please visit DC Cancer Consortium.

Nash & Associates in the Community: Wendy Kopp and Teach for America

Thursday, June 23rd, 2011

Tai Dixon of Baltimore Teach for America and IThe Eye Opener serves many purposes.  Not only do we serve as patient advocates, but we do our best to provide information to the community on a variety of topics.  There is little else that is more important to the health of a community than its educational system.  Committed to the health of our community, I recently attended an event sponsored by the Enoch Pratt Free Library:  An intimate discussion with Wendy Kopp, author of A Chance to Make History.

By most objective standards, many of our nation’s schools are failing.  The national conversation about education has been ongoing and has resulted in a series of changes to the way we educate our children.  The people driving those changes often go unrecognized by the greater public.  Their efforts are profound, but unless you are in some way connected to the educational movement, their names are not easily recognized.  Let me introduce Wendy Kopp and Teach for America.

“Wendy Kopp is the chief executive officer and founder of Teach For America, whose mission is to build the movement to eliminate educational inequity by enlisting the nation’s most promising future leaders in the effort. She is also chief executive officer and co-founder of Teach For All, which is working to accelerate and increase the impact of this model around the world.

Wendy proposed the creation of Teach For America in her undergraduate senior thesis in 1989. Today more than 8,000 Teach For America corps members are in the midst of two year teaching commitments in 39 regions across the country, reaching over 500,000 students, and 20,000 alumni are working inside and outside the field of education to continue the effort to ensure educational excellence and equity.

Since 2007, Wendy has led the development of Teach For All to be responsive to requests for support from social entrepreneurs around the world who are passionate about adapting the model to their contexts. Teach For All is a growing global network of independent organizations pursuing this mission in 18 countries, from India and China to Brazil and Lebanon. ”

Recently, Wendy was in town to discuss the education of America’s children.  The same questions remain:  “How do we ensure that every child is provided with a top-notch education, regardless of their socio-economic status?”  “How can we empower teachers to change the lives of their students?”  “How do we ensure that education is funded at appropriate levels?”  At an event moderated by Freeman Hrabowski, president of my alma mater UMBC, Wendy provided insightful answers to these questions.  The progress made in Baltimore and Washington D.C. schools is remarkable and is in no small part as a result of the efforts of Teach for America.

The reality, however, is that Wendy Kopp, Teach for America and its supporters cannot do it alone.  Improving education should be a community goal shared by all.  So I issue the challenge to you:  what can you contribute to ensure that our children receive an excellent education?  Can you give your time?  Your wealth?  Please feel free to leave your comments below…

Credit:  www.teachforamerica.org

Related Links:      Charity begins at home:  OriolesREACH program hits a grand slam with us!

Pictured above:  Tai Dixon of Baltimore Teach for America and I.

How Much is Your Marriage Worth?

Friday, June 10th, 2011

When you’re injured as a result of someone else’s negligence, it’s easy to see why you have a legal claim. You are entitled to recover for the injuries that you suffered, including economic damages (lost wages, medical bills, etc.) and non-economic damages (pain and suffering). However, if you’re married, there is another category of damages that you may be able to recover – damage to your marriage. It’s called Loss of Consortium and is an important element of damages in the right circumstances. It is a legal recognition that the marital relationship itself – separate and apart from the injury to the individual – is a protected interest that is deserving of compensation if it has been harmed by the negligence of another person.

Loss of consortium has an interesting history. Under Common Law (which roughly translates to “the olden days” in this circumstance) a woman had no right to sue for loss of consortium. It was only the man who had the right. That was because the woman was essentially seen as the man’s property. If she was injured and unable to provide her usual domestic or bedroom duties as a result of someone else’s negligence, the man could recover for the loss of such services. He had basically lost some of the value of his property so he was entitled to compensation. Eventually, the courts (most courts, at least) recognized the unfairness of such a one-sided system and ruled that women could also make such a claim if their husband suffered an injury. However, there are still some states (Virginia, for example) that do not recognize loss of consortium at all, no matter who tries to bring it.

Back to the present day. A loss of consortium claim arises when one spouse suffers a serious injury that impairs the marital relationship. An easy example is if a husband suffers a traumatic brain injury as a result of a doctor’s negligence. In that circumstance, the man would be able to file a claim for his own damages, of course, but he and his wife could also allege loss of consortium because the brain injury impacts the marriage. The couple will now find it more difficult to do the things they use to do together as man and wife – going out together, caring for their children, taking vacations, intimacy, and the day-to-day marital difficulties that arise because the husband now has a brain injury. In Maryland, a jury can award monetary damages for the couples’ loss of companionship, affection, assistance and yes, sexual relations. It is notoriously difficult to put a dollar figure on such injuries, but the law recognizes the right of a husband and wife to recover financially if their marriage has been damaged. How much money to award for such injury is for the jury to decide. Like other damages, it is always the plaintiffs’ burden to prove that the marriage has been injured, which is usually done through the testimony of the husband and wife.

Speaking of intimacy, some pundits say that loss of consortium is just a code-word for damage to the couples’ sex life. This is not entirely true as the marital relationship entails far more than just sex, but these pundits have a point. A loss of consortium claim usually does include an allegation that the couples’ sex life has been impacted. If you are bringing a lawsuit, you have to understand that when you allege loss of consortium, you are opening up the door on the most intimate parts of your life. Defense attorneys will often ask highly personal questions – how often did you have sex before the injury, how often do you have sex now, how exactly does the injury make sex more difficult, have either of you ever strayed from the marriage, etc. Some couples are understandably reluctant to discuss such things. Thankfully, most defense attorneys are just as uncomfortable asking these questions as the plaintiffs are answering them, so the questions tend to be over with relatively quickly. Be aware, though, that if you do file a loss of consortium claim, your sex life may become an issue in open court.

In the District of Columbia, a loss of consortium claim is for similar damages, but with a slight difference. While in Maryland the claim belongs to both the husband and the wife and is brought by them jointly, in the District of Columbia the claim belongs solely to the non-injured spouse. Any money awarded by the jury for loss of consortium goes to the non-injured spouse rather than to the couple jointly.

Lastly, Maryland’s cap on non-economic damages applies to claims for loss of consortium. There is no separate cap for this claim. In other words, there is a single cap that applies to all allegations of injuries, whether it’s an injury to the individual or an injury to the marriage.  The Maryland Legislature does not allow a couple to receive more money for injury to the marriage above and beyond the cap, even if a jury decides that that money should be given. Just another example of how Maryland’s cap punishes plaintiffs.

Have you ever suffered an injury that impacted your marriage? Did you file a loss of consortium claim? What was the result?

Related Nash and Associates Links

Maryland’s alleged healthcare “crisis”

Insurance and Traumatic Brain Injury

Acquired Brain Injuries