Posts Tagged ‘drug companies’

Who’s Hawking Rx Drugs? Is It Really an Effective Medication or Just Effective Marketing?

Thursday, October 28th, 2010

We have all seen the non-stop drug ads on TV – a pill or injection that will cure whatever it is that ails us. Public advertising, however, is just one way that pharmaceutical companies get their drugs into the market place. Behind the scenes, there is a full-blown marketing campaign that the public never sees in which drug companies hire doctors (tens of thousands of doctors) to spread the word on their drugs, primarily by giving talks to other doctors.  An ongoing investigation by ProPublica reveals that some of these doctors have significant disciplinary actions in their past:

A review of physician licensing records in the 15 most-populous states and three others found sanctions against more than 250 speakers, including some of the highest paid. Their misconduct included inappropriately prescribing drugs, providing poor care or having sex with patients. Some of the doctors had even lost their licenses.  More than 40 have received FDA warnings for research misconduct, lost hospital privileges or been convicted of crimes. And at least 20 more have had two or more malpractice judgments or settlements. This accounting is by no means complete; many state regulators don’t post these actions on their web sites.

There is no doubt that the pharmaceutical industry (sometimes referred to as Big Pharma) is a huge industry.  According to IMS Health,a healthcare information and consulting company, prescription drugs generate $300 billion in sales in the United States alone.  Therefore, the pressure on drug companies to market their products is immense. For the doctors out there, doing free-lance work for drug companies can be a very lucrative side-business, with some physicians earning as much as $1,500 to $2,000 for giving a single talk to a group of doctors. While there is nothing wrong with marketing a legal product, the public must be assured that the marketing is honest and that the drugs in question are being prescribed because they are effective drugs, not simply because the drug companies have an effective marketing campaign.

“Without question the public should care,” said Dr. Joseph Ross, an assistant professor of medicine at Yale School of Medicine who has written about the industry’s influence on physicians. “You would never want your kid learning from a bad teacher. Why would you want your doctor learning from a bad doctor, someone who hasn’t displayed good judgment in the past?”

Big Pharma appears to be turning a relatively blind eye to the situation. As part of its investigation, ProPublica compiled a database of physicians who work for the drug companies, and then cross-checked these doctors’ credentials and state disciplinary records.  The drug companies themselves could have taken this approach in vetting their doctors, but most do not bother to do so. Most companies “rely on self-reporting and checks of federal databases.”  However, it is the state disciplinary records that typically contain the relevant data on doctors who have been disciplined (and even state authorities do not always post such infractions on their websites). Lisa Bero, a pharmacy professor at University of California, San Francisco, questions the way that Big Pharma checks on its doctors:

Did they not do background checks on these people?  Why did they pick them? If they did things in their background that are questionable, what about the information they’re giving to me now?

In addition to disciplinary actions, ProPublica also raises questions as to these doctors’ credentials, e.g. medical research, academic appointments and professional society involvement, that would make them especially qualified to speak on medical conditions and ways to treat them. The investigation highlights a Las Vegas endocrinologist who has earned over $300,000 from Big Pharma. However, ProPublica contends that it was unable to locate any credentials on this doctor other than his schooling and some 20-year-old research articles. Furthermore, an online brochure from a recent presentation given by this doctor indicated that he was the chief of endocrinology at a local hospital, but “an official there said he hasn’t held that title since 2008.” Such stories only add to the serious questions as to how Big Pharma is selecting its doctors.

Certainly, a lot of good can come from honest marketing of effective new drugs. Especially in out-of-the way places, a talk by a knowledgeable physician can be a great source of information on new treatments available for a certain disease. If a new drug is truly effective, then by all means the word needs to get out on that drug because such drugs allow us to live longer and to live more comfortably with what were once debilitating diseases.  However, the public must demand honest assessment of these drugs. When drug companies allow unscrupulous doctors to hawk their wares, it raises legitimate suspicion as to whether these drugs are so popular because they are truly effective or simply because they had a good marketing blitz.

If you are curious about a specific doctor, ProPublica has a searchable database of doctors who do work for drug companies. Also, ProPublica has published several follow-up and/or related articles which can be found here.