Posts Tagged ‘elderly’

West Nile Virus is Back in D.C. -Things You Should Do to Stop the Spread

Wednesday, October 12th, 2011

Last week, the D.C. Department of Health confirmed this year’s first case of West Nile Virus (WNV). WNV is a bird disease. However, infected mosquitoes can transmit the virus to humans. Otherwise, this disease cannot be transmitted directly from a human or a bird.  Persons infected with the West Nile Virus may experience severe headaches, fever, nausea, vomiting, muscle aches, pain, and stiffness.

While the risk of a WNV infection is low, individuals who are immunocompromised should be particularly careful and seek medical attention if symptoms are present. Individuals with weak or suppressed immune systems include the elderly, young children and those prone to infections (e.g., HIV/AIDS patients).  The key is to implement measures to reduce exposure to mosquitoes. Individuals at risk should wear long-sleeved shirts and pants. Mosquito repellent should be used as well.

Every year, the Department of Health conducts WNV testing throughout the District, particularly in areas where infections have been reported. If you live in an affected area, you might receive additional information from the Department. Larvicide may be sprayed in your neighborhood. Should you require additional information about WNV, feel free to contact the D.C. Department of Health.

In the meantime, while mosquitoes are still flying around, here are a few things you could do stop the spread of the WNV:

1.  Dispose of cans, bottles and open containers properly.  Store items for recycling in covered containers.
2.  Remove discarded tires. Drill drainage holes in tires used on playground equipment.
3. Clean roof gutters and downspouts regularly.  Eliminate standing water from flat roofs.
4. Turn over plastic wading pools, wheelbarrows, and canoes when not in use.
5. Cover waste containers with tight-fitting lids; never allow lids or cans to accumulate water.
6. Flush bird baths and potted plant trays twice each week.
7. Adjust tarps over grills, firewood piles, boats or swimming pools to eliminate small pockets of water from standing   several days.
8. Re-grade low areas where water stands; clean debris in ditches to eliminate standing water in low spots.
9. Maintain swimming pools, clean and chlorinate them as needed, aerate garden ponds and treat with “mosquito dunks” found at hardware stores.
10. Fix dripping water faucets outside and eliminate puddles from air conditioners.
11. Store pet food and water bowls inside when not in use.

Please share this information with your friends and neighbors.

“Hospital Delirium” – a true concern for our society!

Friday, June 25th, 2010

There is a concerning report posted today by JusticeNewsFlash.com regarding “hospital delirium” in elderly patients. While it has long been recognized that elderly patients in hospitals are many times confused during their hospital stays, “contemporary resarch has indicated that such episodes may be accompanied by significant negative consequences” – longer hospitalizations, delayed procedures, increasing health costs, dementia later in life and a sginifciant rise inpremature death.

The American Geriatrics Society estimated that approximately one-third of patients over the age of 70, experience hospital delirium. Intensive-care and post-surgical patients also have an increased tendency to endure such cognitive lapses.

Though the cause of hospital delirium, more often reported as “confusion,” remains unknown, doctors have become more aware of its potential triggers. These included infections, surgery, pneumonia, medical procedures such as catheter insertions, among others.

All of these cases and procedures have a tendency to incite apprehension in many elderly patients. Certain medications have also been linked to hospital delirium.

McKnight’s, an online source for long-term care and assisted living, reports in a posting on June 24th:

A study has been underway by researchers at Indiana University. The report’s author, Dr. Malaz A. Boustani, referred to delirium among elderly patients as “more dangerous than a fall.”

On June 20, 2010, Pam Belluck, a reporter for the New York Times wrote a piece entitled “Hallucinations in Hospital Pose Risk to Elderly.” She recounts a chilling story of exactly how an 84 year old patient, Justin Kaplan, a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian with a razor intellect … became profoundly delirious while hospitalized for pneumonia last year. For hours in the hospital, he said, he imagined despotic aliens, and he struck a nurse and threatened to kill his wife and daughter.”

Doctors once dismissed it as a “reversible transient phenomenon,” thinking “it’s O.K. for someone, if they’re elderly, to become confused in the hospital,” said Dr. Sharon Inouye, a Harvard Medical School professor.

This thinking is now becoming significantly modified.

Some hospitals are adopting delirium-prevention programs, including one developed by Dr. Inouye, which adjusts schedules, light and noise to help patients sleep, ensures that patients have their eyeglasses and hearing aids, and has them walk, exercise and do cognitive activities like word games.

On a personal note, a very close relative of mine had undergone a knee replacement operation. Within a day of surgery, this elderly woman became so disoriented that she was convinced that she was being attacked by a strange man entering her room in the middle of the night. Fearing for her life, she picked up the nearest ‘weapon’ she could find – the bedside telephone – and struck the ‘intruder’ with the phone. It turned out that this ‘intruder’ was a male nurse coming to take her vitals. Hearing of this incident and shocked that this woman – my mother – would ever do such a thing (since she was the embodiment of the description -”wouldn’t hurt a fly”), my sister and I asked the hospital to check her electrolytes. It turned out that they were wildly abnormal. She was administered the necessary replacement therapy and returned to her normal, sweet self – having absolutely no memory of this incident whatsoever.

It is no secret that as the Baby Boomer population ages, the number of people in our country over the age of 70 will soon be very significant. We can only hope that physicians such as Dr. Sharon Inouye and Dr. Malaz Boustani will continue their research and efforts to learn what can be done to minimize the incidence rate of “hospital delirium.” It is good to see recognition of this problem now exists and that the concept of “it’s OK – it will pass; they’re just confused” is becoming a thinking process of the past.