Posts Tagged ‘Eye Opener’

Week in Review (April 23 – 29, 2011): The Eye Opener Health and Law Blog

Saturday, April 30th, 2011

From the Editor:

Last week was a busy but productive week for our firm’s blawgers – 6 posts – and we actually practiced law a lot! My personal thanks to our writers for taking the time to post some important pieces on health, safety, medicine and law. To our readers, my continued and sincere thanks as well. While it’s great to pull-out our soapbox and write about stuff we do and are passionate about, it’s incredibly rewarding to have you, our readers, take the time to read what we write. To those who left comments, a special thanks. We really enjoy interacting with you!

Now on to the business at hand. What did we write about that you may find interesting? Here you go.

My Pet Peeves About the New Age Mediation Process

Having been inspired by a fellow blawger from New York, Scott Greenfield, who chided legal bloggers (thus the name “blawgers”) for simply rehashing news and not taking a stand on issues, I wrote a piece called Mediation of Lawsuits: The 5 Top Things that Tick Me Off!

Having recently been through a number of mediations that were enough to pull your hair out because of the silliness that people engage in when they claim they are mediating to get cases resolved, I decided that it was time to take a stand and post a personal rant. While perhaps best understood by lawyers, claims adjusters and mediators, this blawg was not intended just for them. I’ve seen what impact foolish approaches and conduct by the participants to mediation can have on my clients, the injured parties. It was time to sound-off; so that’s what I did. I once again invite anyone who has been a party to a lawsuit mediation to do your own personal sound-off and tell us what it was like for you. It’s your turn to tell us just how much you enjoyed the process and what can be done to make it better. Read the horror story told in our Comments section by one of our Canada readers when she went through a domestic mediation process. Share your thoughts and stories as well.

Health Care: Who’s “Voiceless” When It Comes to Being Heard on Capitol Hill

Guess I had too much time on my hands at the beginning of this week (not really!). I couldn’t help but be inspired by a piece Jason Penn had done last week about how families were so adversely affected by the budget cuts that were made when the government shutdown was looming a few weeks ago. As I was going through my Google Reader early this past week, I came across an Op Ed by a doctor, who was complaining or at least suggesting that the president and congress need to hear more what doctors had to say about health care reform. Having read that, Jason’s piece jumped into my mind and the result was my blawg entitled Health Reform: What voice does the patient have in the debate.

The post brings to light the amount of money being spent by the healthcare industry in its lobbying efforts on health care reform. ObamaCare‘s raison d’etre is explored as well since it is ironic, if not sad, how the story behind all this money, lobbying and legislation seems to have been lost in the rhetoric. More affordable, better and available health care for our citizens? Then why were the most needy among us the victims of back room wheeling and dealing when the time came for budget cuts to save the federal government from closing its doors? I ask the question – who’s voice is being heard – but more important – who’s is not?

FDA approves use of “meningitis drug,” Menactra, for younger children

Hopefully you’ll never need to use this information, but if you do, Jason Penn reported on a condition – meningitis – that can affect not only adults and older children, but infants and toddlers as well. Meningitis is generally defined as an inflammation of the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord. Prior to a recent change in position by the FDA, there wasn’t a vaccine available for children under the age of 2. Now, with the FDA’s recent approval, Menactra can be used to vaccinate children from the age of 9 months to age 2.

In addition to this news release, Jason tells parents about the signs and symptoms they should be aware of to spot this condition.

The classic symptoms of meningitis are a high fever, headache and stiff neck. Detection of these symptoms, particularly headache and stiff neck are certainly difficult to detect in infants and toddlers. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, infants with meningitis may appear slow or inactive, have vomiting, be irritable, or be feeding poorly. Seizures are also a possibility.

To learn more about this important topic, read his piece Meningitis & Your Baby: Three Things to Think About.

Why are children still dying because of venetian blinds?

Sarah Keogh wrote what I believe is a very important piece for parents, grandparents or anyone who has a baby in the house. Years ago we all heard about the horror of parents finding their babies dead from strangulation when their necks became entangled in venetian blinds. Years have passed since those stories made the front page. Well, an update on just how well manufacturers and parents have been doing to avoid such tragedies was recently posted in The New York Times.

In her blawg entitled Window Blinds: Why are Children Still Dying, Sarah tells us the sad truth that these deaths and injuries still continue in our country. Find out what you as a caregiver of a young child need to realize about this product. Maybe you’ve put the cords up high and out-of-reach for your baby. Maybe you’ve taken other steps to avoid such a nightmarish event ever happening in your home and in your life. Unfortunately, many who have done so have still suffered this tragedy. Why? What is being done by manufacturers and the government to prevent these injuries and deaths ? Read Sarah’s piece for the answers and some practical advice you can take to make your home safer for your child.

Hospitals Reporting Methods for “Adverse Events”

We all know by now that if you want to look good to the public, all you have to do is “play with the numbers.” Well, it seems like hospitals have a penchant for doing just that. One of the key “numbers” that advocates of patient health and safety look at is how many “adverse events” take place in any given hospital. An “adverse event,” as you may already know, is – simply put – any harm to a patient as a result of medical care.

In his post this past week, Jason Penn compares some interesting adverse event bookkeeping by hospitals throughout our country. His blawg, The New Enron? Are Hospitals Cooking the Books?, brings to light serious flaws in the way that our medical institutions “count” the number of so-called adverse events taking place within their walls. His research for this piece reveals…

[M]edical errors occur 10 times more than previously thought.Maybe that wasn’t hard hitting enough. Let me try again. How about this: mistakes occur in one out of every three hospital admissions!

Frankly, that strikes me as an astounding and very concerning number. Are the numbers being reported reflecting this? The simple answer is no. Why not? Read Jason’s post and see what reporting systems are in place – or not in place as the case may be. We all remember Enron. Is this the medical version of “making the numbers look good” when they simply are not!

Surgeons and Booze – an Obvious Bad Combination – Who’s Protecting Us?

It doesn’t take a genius to realize that surgeons should not be under the influence when we as patients are “under the knife” What’s not so obvious is just how prevalent this may be in the operating rooms of our country (and throughout the world).

Wondering what the studies have been done by the medical profession to examine this problem? Have any idea what regulations are in place by hospitals to guard against the problem of “hungover surgeons”?

Wonder no more. Jon Stefanuca’s blog this past week, Hungover Surgeons: Watch Out! There’s Nothing Between You and Their Scalpel!,will tell you all you need to know. Jon queries: “Should hospitals regulate for patient safety?” What do you think? Share your comments.

A “Sneak Peak” of the week ahead

Some more good advice is on the way for parents of special needs children. We all know about what a wonderful aide dogs are for the blind. Mike Sanders will share what he’s learned how these canine wonders are being used for kids in need. Suffering from asthma or know someone who is? Jon Stefanuca will be sharing with  you some valuable information on this topic next week. A number of our clients or their now-deceased family members have suffered from this condition. Jon will share a story or two (without revealing protected confidential information) to bring to light just how this medical condition needs to be better recognized and treated by our health care providers before its too late. We all know what a difficult job nursing can be. That being said, Sarah Keogh will be telling us about some very concerning “trends” that are coming to light in this wonderful profession. Stay tuned for this important piece.

We’ll start next week off with a new blawg by our in-house medical specialist, Theresa Neumann. Her post on how important it can be to get a second opinion before you sign-up for a surgery, procedure or test is sitting in the queue just waiting to hit the pages of The Eye Opener – Views and Opinions from the Nash Community.

One Final Note: I wrote in last weekend’s Week In Review that we intended to post a new White Paper by Marian Hogan on a very important topic relating to Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA). It didn’t happen – because of “my Bad.” I fouled-up and sent the wrong draft of Marian’ s piece to our graphic designer. He did a wonderful job – as usual – of getting it ready – it just wasn’t the right version. The problem is fixed, but my mistake will delay the posting of this important White Paper for another week. Public apology: Sorry, Marian! We’ll make it right soon.


Gratitude: We just topped 8,000 monthly readers – Thanks so much!

Saturday, April 16th, 2011

When we started our blog about 15 months ago, we were hoping that someone – other than our relatives and friends – would come and read our posts. I’m sitting at my computer working on a blog for this coming week and decided I would check our Google Analytics to see how we were doing in trying to get our message out there. Well here’s today’s stats -

Nash & Associates stats via Google Analytics - April 15, 2011

The only words that came to mind when I saw that we had just topped 8,000 visits and almost 11, 500 pages viewed by those visitors over the last 30 days were – and are – THANK YOU!

Yes, I fully realize that these are statistics that apply to our website, but a very large number of these visits are due to folks coming to read our blogs and then checking us out or looking at some other other “stuff” on our website. No – we’re not yet ranked among the big boys or women bloggers, but the numbers tell us that we’re not doing too bad a job either. We’ll just liken ourselves to Avis and keep trying harder.

Almost a year ago, I figured out that if we were ever going to increase our website “hits,” we needed to make our blog, which was sitting on WordPress.com, a subdomain of our website. So, with the help of our “website guy,” we moved the blog over to WordPress.org and voila – the visits started growing immediately.

We – as a law firm – wondered how we could not only market our firm but also how we might be able to actually contribute to our community. As I have said in the past, who really wants to connect with lawyers or a law firm on social media channels? As my wife so aptly likened such a venture – “Who wants to connect with a mortician – unless you need one?” Smart person, my wife.

We ventured into the world of social media via Facebook and Twitter. We initially did the standard lawyer stuff of trying to tell our vast following of about 25 people (yes – our relatives and a few invited but brow-beaten friends) just how wonderful we were as a law firm. Then – after reading a ton of posts by social media gurus and blogging experts – we started to figure out the answer. Notice – I did say “started” – we have a long way to go admittedly.

Blogging by lawyers and socializing via channels such as Facebook and Twitter as a group of lawyers has to be about our readers, friends, fans and followers. We’re still working on it – but at least it seems a good number of people – like YOU (since you must be reading this) are looking for information that can help YOU.

We now have over 500 Fans on our Facebook business page, just under 2,500 followers on our firm’s Twitter page and now – as I learned today – over 8,000 monthly visitors to our website – primarily reading our blog! We just want to say THANK YOU to all of you. You have made the hard times of doing blogging and engaging in social media in the midst of a very busy law practice a rewarding, enriching and wonderful experience. Your loyalty and – yes – friendship – have been a fabulous motivating force to keep all of us going.

We are constantly searching to find new and exciting information in the world of law and medicine. As I wrote in our Twitter profile – I – and my team at Nash & Associates are just -

Lawyer[s] trying to get the word out so you never need [people] like us. Newbie[s] but lover[s] of Blogging on tips n’ tricks (and other stuff) to wisely use healthcare.

That’s why we blog, tweet and post on Facebook. Sure – if you need us (and hopefully you don’t) – we’re here for our local friends, fans and readers in the Baltimore-Washington area. But even more important – we will try to reward your loyalty and friendship with our best efforts to provide you with news, insights, tips and tricks and whatever other good stuff we can muster over the coming weeks, months and years to come.

If at any time you want to drop us a message on what YOU would like for us to write about, we would most certainly appreciate any suggestions you may have. Just drop us a line via Facebook, a direct message on Twitter or through our website’s contact form. Your thoughts and suggestions on how we can accomplish our mission and better connect with you will always be most welcomed and appreciated.

So – again – THANKS to all of you who make and take the time to read what we have to write. Don’t forget to hit the comment button and share YOUR thoughts with us and our other readers as well.

Brian Nash – Editor-in-Chief of Eye Opener – Views and Opinions from the Nash Community

Week in Review: If you missed this past week’s blogs – catch up!

Sunday, April 10th, 2011

This past week was a busy one for our bloggers. It was also a very busy week in our law practice. Over the last two months, we have also had two new lawyers join us – Sarah Keogh and Jason Penn. Sarah has contributed a number of posts already. Jason , who just started this past Monday, will soon be sharing his contributions, thoughts and comments with you as well. We’re very happy to have both of them. I’m sure you join us in wishing them a very warm welcome.

Last week our writers covered a number of topics related to health, medicine, child safety, medical technology and patient safety. We started the week off with a piece by Brian Nash on some key facts women need to be aware of when having an epidural for labor, delivery and post-partum pain relief.

Epidurals

There can be no doubt that thousands of epidurals are administered to women every day throughout this country. This form of analgesia (pain relief) has become probably the most popular form of anesthetic management and apparently is generally believed to be essentially risk free. As this week’s piece, Having an epidural when you have your baby? 3 questions to ask the doctor, reports, some literature gives the figure of complications from epidurals as high as 23% - ranging in severity from minor inconveniences, to life-long major disabilities and even death.

This particular piece was written as a result of several cases in which we have been involved when women, who had undergone an epidural, became essentially paralyzed from the waist down. We raise some questions for women to ask the doctor and suggest they just might want to ask those questions before they find themselves in the process of labor or when they are going through the recovery phase of having given birth to their baby. We believe it’s an important piece for women – and frankly for all – to read so that they have a much better idea of what they should expect with an epidural and what the risks and benefits are of this wonderful yet potentially life-altering anesthetic technique.

Shaken-Baby-Syndrome

On Wednesday, Jon Stefanuca again brought to the public’s attention a problem that is probably as old as childbirth. Everyone who has had the experience of taking care of a child – particularly a baby – knows that along with the joy of parenting comes the physical and emotional toll on parents and care-givers. The human condition makes us all susceptible to being less than completely tolerant, forgiving and gentle with little ones when we are under stress, frustrated or just plain exhausted. The response to the persistent crying can simply not be “a good shake.”

Medicine and science (and unfortunately the courtroom) have given a name to a syndrome of injury babies can suffer when that “just a good shake” approach is used. While a parent or care-giver may think it unimaginable to strike a child, they may not realize just now much harm they can do with “just a good shake.” Jon brings this information and some expert tips and tricks on how to deal with these difficult times parents and care-givers face in their everyday lives in his piece Shaken Baby Syndrome – What we all should know to prevent child abuse.

Makena: New Anti-Prematurity Drug

Thursday, Sarah Keogh reported on a relatively new drug called Makena, which has been found to help pregnant women, who have previously had a premature infant. I say “relatively” since according to Sarah’s piece, a compounding pharmacy could and was making this medication prior to the FDA giving K-V Pharmaceutical Company the exclusive rights to manufacture this drug for a period of 7 years.

Read Sarah’s piece, Makena: Drug to fight prematurity leads to major firestorm, and see what the controversy is all about. How could people possible be upset with a drug that can fight premature birth? Prematurity is one of the major causes of significant childbirth injuries such as cerebral palsy. Sarah’s blog makes it all too clear why people are upset and why the March of Dimes withdrew its sponsorship for Makena.

Medical Technology and Patient Safety

The week ended with Part II of my series on medical technology and whether all the new toys, bells and whistles of our modern healthcare system are truly advancing safe, efficient and effective delivery of healthcare. The week’s piece focuses on perhaps one of the largest advances in the healthcare industry – electronic medical records (EMR).

The blog, Medical Technology and Patient Safety – Part II – EMR’s (electronic medical records), brings a lawyer’s perspective to this topic. Much has already been written – and frankly will continue to be written – about EMR’s by the medical profession. Controversy has filed the pages of journals and at times probably slowed traffic on the internet (okay – maybe that’s a bit of an exaggeration) since this new marvelous technological advance was rolled-out in our medical institutions.  Those writing and fighting about it have been the end-users themselves – the medical professionals, who have to deal with the issues and flaws that have surfaced with this wonderful new technology. I thought it was about time to tell you how this plays out by another end-user – the lawyer who now deals with EMR’s. This piece is also intended as the foundation for what we as lawyer have seen play-out in terms of patient safety and health as a result of EMR implementation.

Sneak Peak of the Week Ahead

I anticipate that next week we’ll be seeing Jason Penn with his first blog on a recent report about numerous safety violations by hospitals in our practice jurisdictions – Maryland and Washington, D.C. Mike Sanders will be bringing to our readers aN old but back-in-the-news report on super infections, which still seem to be – unfortunately – thriving in our nation’s hospitals. We’ll start off this coming week with a piece by Theresa Neumann, our highly acclaimed in-house physician’s assistant expert, on spinal stroke. We all know about strokes that can damage the brain. Theresa will be sharing her insights on an equally devastating stroke of the spinal cord. I also suspect – shhh – that we’ll be reading more from Sarah Keogh this coming week. If the practice of law doesn’t get too much in the way, I am also hoping to share with you some real life examples – from a lawyer’s perspective – of just how EMR’s may not be advancing the causes of patient safety and health.

As with all our blogs, we sincerely invite you to not only read our thoughts and comments but to also share yours with us and our readers. Our latest stats show that around 10,000 pages are viewed by our readers and visitors every month! We sincerely thank all of you, who have taken the time out of your busy lives to read our offerings in The Eye Opener – Views and Opinions from the Nash Community. We invite you to share our posts with your friends and colleagues. Don’t forget to sign-up for easy delivery to your email inbox. Last – but certainly not least – come join our social media communities on Facebook and Twitter.

The Week in Review: did you miss last week’s posts on health, safety, medicine, law and healthcare? A sneak preview of the week ahead.

Saturday, March 26th, 2011

Eye Opener - Nash & Associates Blog

This week we are starting a weekly posting of our blogs of this past week, some key blogs of interest to our more than 6,500 monthly readers, and a sneak preview of what’s coming next week. We would really like for you to join our community of readers, so don’t forget to hit the RSS Feedburner button or subscribe to our blog, Eye Opener. We share with you our thoughts, insights and analysis of what’s new in the law, the world of law and medicine, health, patient and consumer safety as well as a host of other topics that we deal with as lawyers on a daily basis in trying to serve the needs of our clients.

For those of you on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn, we have a vibrant presence on those social networks as well. Hit the icon(s) of your choice and become part of our ever-growing social network community. Share your thoughts, share our posts, give us your feedback on what YOU would like to hear about.

This Past Week

Birth Defect Updates: Warnings About Opioid Use Before and During Pregnancy In this post, Sarah Keogh, explored a new report which is vital information for women who are pregnant or thinking about becoming pregnant. Opiods, narcotic pain killers such as morphine, codeine, hydrocodone and oxycodone, are a valuable part of a physician’s drug armamentarium, but they can have significant implications for a fetus if taken during pregnancy or even just before a woman become pregnant. Read Sarah’s important piece, be informed and learn why you should discuss the use of any such drugs with your obstetrician/gynecologist before taking them.

 

Doctors Disciplined by Their Own Hospitals Escape Actions by Licensing Boards. Who’s at Fault? Brian Nash, founder of the firm, writes about a serious problem with this country’s medical licensing boards, who have failed, at an alarming rate, to take disciplinary action against physicians, who have had their hospital privileges revoked, suspended or curtailed for issues such as sub-standard care, moral transgressions and the like. Public Citizen brought this story to light; we analyze the issue and share our thoughts on this serious patient health and safety issue.

Decreasing Obesity Risks in Children: Another Benefit of Breastfeeding A mom herself and an advocate for public health childhood obesityand safety throughout her legal career, Sarah Keogh reports on a recent study covered by the Baltimore Sun about the long-term benefits of breastfeeding for at least six months. The issue for many, however, is – how can a family of two income earners afford to do this? Does our society and the workplace really lend itself to this practice? Read Sarah’s compelling piece and share your experience and thoughts.

The Week Ahead

Sneak preview of what’s ahead during the week of March 28, 2011:

medical technology

Brian Nash begins a series on the issue of medical technology and patient health/safety. Is the medical community being properly trained in the proper and safe use of all the new medical devices that are hitting our hospitals, clinics and medical offices? Is the rush to have the newest, shiniest and “best” new medical device really advancing the safe and effective delivery of healthcare in our country? Here’s a sneak preview…

Dr. Roper and so many other dedicated healthcare professionals are faced daily with the same issue – “…challenged by the task of putting lofty ideas into practice at the local level. I remain very committed to the effort, but we are daily challenged to put the best ideas into practice.” Put another way – at least for me – taking public healthcare policy and practices and making a much better widget.

As these lofty concepts were debated, published and analyzed, technology streaked along with its new bells and whistles at what some might call an amazing – almost mystifying – pace. Did you really envision yourself 25 years ago sitting with your iPhone or iPad and scouring the world’s news, chatting with your friends and followers on the other side of the planet, watching the latest streaming video of March Madness or sharing every random thought you have on Twitter or Facebook?

Some top posts you may have missed

What happens when your surgeon has been up all night and you are being wheeled into the operating room to be his or her next surgical case? We looked at an article from The New England Journal of Medicine that addressed this patient safety issue and made recommendations for change.  See our posting entitled A Surgeon’s Sleep Deprivation and Elective Surgery-Not a good (or safe) combination.

Dr. Kevin Pho, who is the well known editor and contributor of KevinMD.com, wrote a piece in which he espoused his belief that medical malpractice cases really do not improve patient safety. Having read this piece and finding that this was just too much to digest, Brian Nash wrote a counter-piece entitled Malpractice System Doesn’t Improve Patient Safety – Oh Really? What this led to was cross-posting by Dr. Kevin Pho on our blog, Eye Opener, and our posting on his blog. Our blog post (as best I can tell) led to one of the all-time highest postings of comments by readers of KevinMD. One thing all participants in the “debate” learned – we are both passionate about our positions. Read what led to this firestorm.