Posts Tagged ‘Health’

Can Copper Surfaces and Duct Tape Reduce Hospital Infections and Deaths?

Thursday, July 7th, 2011

Image from medgadget.com

How many times have you heard about someone entering the hospital healthy, or relatively so, and developing a dangerous infection while hospitalized? What about the number of times that you may have visited your own doctor’s office or your child’s pediatrician’s office and wondered whether the cold you got a few days later was coincidence or the result of having been in the waiting and exam rooms following other sick patients? Have you ever considered what cleaning procedures are done in hospital rooms when one patient is discharged before another takes their place?

In the past, Brian Nash and the other legal bloggers here at Eye Opener have written posts and made mention of the importance of hospital cleanliness and sterility, see the related posts below. We have been involved in cases involving the devastating results of infections. However, everyone knows that there are going to be germs in hospitals. Even the best hospitals have to work to keep the patients, rooms and visitors clean and safe.

Well, there is news that may make keeping hospitals and other health care environments less germy in the future. Two recent articles have focused on seemingly simple solutions, copper and duct tape, that may have major impacts on infection control.

Copper Surfaces Dramatically Reduce Infections by Killing Bacteria

A Reuters’ article reports that a recent study “presented at the World Health Organization’s 1st International Conference on Prevention and Infection Control (ICPIC) in Geneva, Switzerland” shows that “replacing the most heavily contaminated touch surfaces in ICUs with antimicrobial copper will control bacteria growth and cut down on infection rates.” According to the Reuters’ article:

[a]ntimicrobial copper surfaces in intensive care units (ICU) kill 97 percent of bacteria that can cause hospital-acquired infections, according to preliminary results of a multisite clinical trial in the United States. The results also showed a 40 percent reduction in the risk of acquiring an infection.

This news could have a profound impact on health-care costs, disease spread, and most importantly lives lost. If hospitals are able to replace some of their current surfaces with copper surfaces, at least in the parts of the hospital that are most frequently the source of infections, there could be a dramatic improvement in hospital-acquired infections.

Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) are the fourth leading cause of death in the United States behind heart disease, strokes and cancer.

According to estimates provided by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, nearly one in every 20 hospitalized U.S. patients acquires an HAI, resulting in 100,000 lives lost each year.

From Reuters

Perhaps even more infections could be prevented if these changes could be made outside of just ICUs. For instance, perhaps copper surfaces could replace highly touched surfaces on sink handles, the doors to hospital rooms, hospital bed rails, or in out-patient surgery centers and long-term care facilities that are not housed within hospitals.

Duct Tape Warnings Keep Others Far Enough Away from Infected Patients

Image from ducttapesales.com

An article from Medicalnewstoday reports that some hospitals are using plain duct tape – just colored red – to achieve a reduction in infection rates from highly infectious patients without having to deal with the hassle and expense of all visitors or hospital personnel who enter the room having to rescrub and use new gowns every time they enter the room of an infected patient. The study looked at highly infectious diseases like C. diff that require isolation of patients and very careful hand washing to avoid spreading the infection. So how does duct tape help?

The Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) commissioned a study to corner off a three foot perimeter around the bed of patients in isolation. Medical personnel could enter the room unprotected if they stayed outside the perimeter. Direct patient contact or presence inside the perimeter meant a redo of the cleansing process. The concept, called “Red Box” employs red duct tape, a color used as it provides a strong visual reminder to those who enter the room to be aware.

The study found that 33% of all who entered the rooms could do so without the addition of gowns and gloves, saving the environment, hospital and patient costs, and time without compromising the patient or the medical personnel.

From Medicalnewstoday

How Else Can We Reduce Infections?

What ideas do you have for the use of copper surfaces? Do you think that copper surfaces or duct tape could make a dramatic difference in the safety of hospital admission? What about the cost? Do you think that hospitals would pay the upfront costs of replacing surfaces with copper to be able to dramatically cut infection rates? What about other low cost solutions like duct-tape around the perimeter of the bed? Can you think of other low-cost solutions that could minimize infections and maximize safety?

Related Posts:

New federal study finds ‘lax infection control’ at same-day surgery centers

FDA warning to healthcare professionals: use sterile prep pads!

Skin Cancer Prevention: Will new FDA Rules Help?

Wednesday, June 29th, 2011

In yesterday’s post, I examined the various types of skin cancer and their prevalence in the US. Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer and its incidence is on the rise. In that post, I examined some of the ways to protect yourself from the types of UV radiation that cause skin damage and cancer. One of these protection methods is the use of sunscreen. Sunscreen matters because the data is clear that sun exposure is what is causing deadly skin cancers:

  • About 90 percent of nonmelanoma skin cancers are associated with exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun.
  • The vast majority of mutations found in melanoma are caused by ultraviolet radiation.
  • About 65 percent of melanoma cases can be attributed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun.
  • One or more blistering sunburns in childhood or adolescence more than double a person’s chances of developing melanoma later in life.
  • A person’s risk for melanoma doubles if he or she has had more than five sunburns at any age.

Statistics from the Skin Cancer Foundation website

However, up until now, there has been very little regulation of the marketing of different sunscreens. It has been very difficult for the American public to know whether the sunscreen they were choosing was going to be effective in protecting them from both UVA and UVB rays.  There was also little way to know how much protection you were really receiving and whether the claims like “waterproof” and “sunblock” were just marketing or really claims with research behind them. Why does this matter? Check out this video from the FDA:

How the New FDA Rules Will Help

Well, some of this is going to change next summer. Last week, the FDA announced new regulations of sunscreen. If sunscreens meet the new legal standards, they can use certain marketing phrases so that consumers know what level of protection will be provided by the product. For example, “[u]nder the new labeling, sunscreens labeled as both Broad Spectrum and SPF 15 (or higher), if used regularly, as directed, and in combination with other sun protection measures will help prevent sunburn, reduce the risk of skin cancer, and reduce the risk of early skin aging.”

Image from FDA.gov

Image from FDA.gov

The FDA explains the impact of the new regulations with the following:

  • Broad Spectrum designation. Sunscreens that pass FDA’s broad spectrum test procedure, which measures a product’s UVA protection relative to its UVB protection, may be labeled as “Broad Spectrum SPF [value]” on the front label. For Broad Spectrum sunscreens, SPF values also indicate the amount or magnitude of overall protection. Broad Spectrum SPF products with SPF values higher than 15 provide greater protection and may claim additional uses, as described in the next bullet.
  • Use claims. Only Broad Spectrum sunscreens with an SPF value of 15 or higher can claim to reduce the risk of skin cancer and early skin aging if used as directed with other sun protection measures. Non-Broad Spectrum sunscreens and Broad Spectrum sunscreens with an SPF value between 2 and 14 can only claim to help prevent sunburn.
  • “Waterproof, “sweatproof” or “sunblock” claims. Manufacturers cannot label sunscreens as “waterproof” or “sweatproof,” or identify their products as “sunblocks,” because these claims overstate their effectiveness. Sunscreens also cannot claim to provide sun protection for more than 2 hours without reapplication or to provide protection immediately after application (for example– “instant protection”) without submitting data to support these claims and obtaining FDA approval.
  • Water resistance claims. Water resistance claims on the front label must indicate whether the sunscreen remains effective for 40 minutes or 80 minutes while swimming or sweating, based on standard testing. Sunscreens that are not water resistant must include a direction instructing consumers to use a water resistant sunscreen if swimming or sweating.
  • Drug Facts. All sunscreens must include standard “Drug Facts” information on the back and/or side of the container.

Information from the FDA

So what does this all mean? It means that if you want a sunscreen that will provide protection against both UVA and UVB, you need to choose one that says “broad spectrum” AND has a minimum SPF of 15. You also need to look for a time limit on the water resistance of the sunscreen. In the future, other regulations may take effect, including limiting the SPF claims to 50 since there is no evidence that a higher SPF offers greater protection. The impact of the current rules should be an easier way for consumers to know that they are getting the greatest possible protection from the sunscreen they buy.

The New Regulations Do Not Address the Safety of Ingredients

So, while the new sunscreens will make it clearer whether the sunscreen protects against both UVA and UVB rays and how long the sunscreen will remain water resistant, the regulations do not regulate the ingredients that comprise the sunscreens. The ingredients in the sunscreens have not been tested for safety. Dr. Len has written a blog on the American Cancer Society website that touches on this issue:

Many of the ingredients of sunscreens have been used for years, however the FDA acknowledged today that they have not been tested for safety using modern techniques. They did emphasize that the benefits of sunscreens containing these ingredients far outweigh the risks given their longstanding safety profile.

Nanoparticles present in sunscreen-especially those containing zinc and titanium oxides-have been another source of concern.  It is the use of “nanotechnology” that has made these effective sunscreens more acceptable since they don’t leave you with that white, pasty look that inhibited their use in the past.

Although it appeared during a news conference this morning that the FDA is satisfied at this time that products containing nanoparticles such as zinc and titanium oxides are safe when used as directed based on scientific evidence, another representative seemed a bit more cautious in his comments at second briefing held a couple of hours later by stating that nanoparticles are still being evaluated for safety.

The FDA did say they will continue to examine the science and the data regarding sunscreen ingredients, and will advise consumers promptly should they find evidence to the contrary regarding their safety profile.

One interesting outcome of the FDA’s announcement was their statement that they will be seeking further information from manufacturers and others on the safety and effectiveness of aerosol sunscreens.  The FDA apparently is concerned about inhalation risks as well as effectiveness in real-life use.  This is a sunscreen delivery method that many of us (including me) use often because of ease and convenience, and the questions regarding safety and effectiveness are certain to get some notice.

As more and more people are educated and aware of the risks of skin cancer, the use of sunscreens will presumably rise. Does it worry you that the new regulations deal more with marketing issues and confirming that the sunscreens do work effectively to minimize exposure to UVA and UVB rays than with the safety of the ingredients that provide that protection? Do you agree that since the risk of skin cancer outweighs the potential risks caused by the ingredients?

Personally, I use sunscreen and put it on my children daily. However, I also go out of the way to try to use ones that seem to have the “safest” record in terms of the chemicals involved. I also choose to use sun-shirts and other protective clothing as much as possible when at the pool or beach to minimize the amount skin I have to cover with sunscreen. Okay – honestly – it is also to minimize the amount of sunscreen smearing that I have to do every day. In order to work effectively, you are really supposed to use a lot of sunscreen all over exposed skin. As much as possible, we try to spend out time outside during the early morning and late afternoon/evening to minimize the direct exposure.

What steps do you take to protect yourself from sun exposure? What about the idea that a certain amount of sun exposure is good for Vitamin D production? What about the new FDA regulations, do they may sense? Will you shop for sunscreen differently?

Related Posts:

Skin Cancer: Types, Causes and How to Protect Yourself

Newest Word on Crib Safety: Ban the Bumpers?

Tuesday, June 14th, 2011

Which crib bedding would you choose? Aesthetic or safe?

In the newest topic regarding crib safety, Maryland is considering regulations to ban the sale of crib bumpers. For many years, more and more emphasis has been placed on infants sleeping in safe cribs without any additional “stuff” in them. This has included the elimination of lots of former nursery staples. Baby blankets, stuffed animals, pillows and other loose items have been banned from the crib by safety experts for years. As requirements for cribs have required slats that are closer together, the utility of using a bumper to help a child from getting stuck between crib slats has been eliminated. More recently, the Consumer Product Safety Commission has developed even newer crib safety standards, including eliminating the use of drop-sides, and warned against the use of sleep positioners. Yet, despite the advice to put babies to sleep only on their backs in cribs empty of everything except a well fitting mattress and fitted sheet, many parents and caregivers persist in using other items in cribs. Now, with an increasing number of deaths associated with crib bumpers, Maryland is considering a stronger stance.

Danger of Crib Bumpers

The concern about crib bumpers is that there have been infant deaths associated with suffocation or strangulation and the use of crib bumpers. Some of the deaths are directly attributable to the bumpers (for instance a child found with their head wrapped in the ties of the bumper or their face pressed into the side of the bumper), while others are only potentially related to the bumper use but not definitively so (for instance, children whose death are classified as SIDS, but where bumpers were in use in the crib at the time of death and may have been a contributing factor in the death). This makes the discussion of the dangers muddy – with manufacturers claiming that bumpers are safe and advocates warning against their use to protect against suffocation.

Potential Ban on Sale of Bumpers

When the Baltimore Sun reported on the potential regulations, they mentioned something that gave me pause. They explained that if Dr. Sharfstein, secretary of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, does decide to regulate this issue, the regulations will impact only the sale, not the use of the bumpers. While this makes sense from a policy perspective, the goal is not to punish parents who may not be aware of the safety risks, and from a enforceability perspective, the state cannot possibly enforce a regulation that requires knowledge of whether bumpers are being used in individual homes, the regulation of the sale of the item is going to have some drawbacks.

Will a State Ban Save Lives?

So here are my questions. Will regulations against the sale of these bumpers in Maryland make any difference in saving lives? In this day of internet shopping and wide availability of items through catalogues and easy interstate travel, are Maryland families going to forgo the crib bumper because they cannot be purchased in the local baby store, or are they still going to be buying the bumper with a set of nursery items on Amazon or through a national baby store? Will Internet or national companies without a store presence in Maryland be punished for selling a bumper to a person with a Maryland address? If so, then perhaps the word will get out that these items are dangerous and should not be used. If not, will parents even realize that the goal of the regulation is actually to curb the use of the bumpers. Either way, I guess that by decreasing the number of bumpers in Maryland homes, safety will be increased and perhaps over time, awareness will be increased and other states may follow suit.

Getting the Word Out

My other concern is that if there are parents who are still using bumpers, blankets or other items in their babies’ cribs, is the issue one of parent education? Perhaps the real emphasis needs to be on wider parental awareness of the safety issue. There are lots of great resources available to learn how to put infants to sleep safely:

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VNekf5P9_Yg&feature=youtu.be

Since the early 1990s, the emphasis has been on having infants sleep on their backs. This has lead to a dramatic decrease in SIDS deaths since that time. The “Back to Sleep” campaign began in 1994 and continues to this day.  However, when reading a 2005 paper from the AAP, I was surprised to read that SIDS deaths are more likely to occur when a baby who is used to sleeping on their back is placed to sleep on their stomach. This suggests that education needs to be of all potential caregivers since an occasional babysitter, grandparent or child care provider who is unfamiliar with the recommendations and the child’s normal sleep position may place the child to sleep on their stomach and cause real risk.

AAP has made many recommendations since 2005 including that children sleep in cribs with only a fitted sheet and without any additional soft bedding. These recommendations have varied somewhat over time on the use of bumpers and sleep positioners. However, the overall advice seems to remain the same – eliminate all soft bedding items. Despite these recommendations, there are still images in popular media of nurseries complete with cribs with soft bedding.

What changes are still needed?

What changes are needed to get the word out? Do you think that there needs to be a stronger effort to change the marketing images for infant products? Do you think that a ban on the sale of bumpers will have a significant impact on child safety? What about an education campaign focusing on caregivers, grandparents and day care providers?

Related Posts:

Over Two Million Cribs Recalled…What About Yours?

Infant Safety – drop-down crib hazard; CPSC issues recall

Generation 2 Worldwide and “ChildESIGNS” Drop Side Crib Brands Recalled; Three Infant Deaths Reported

Consumer Product Safety Commission vows to crack down on defective cribs – washingtonpost.com

 

Images from: sidscenter.org, potterybarnkids.com

Week in Review: (June 6 – June 10, 2011) Eye Opener Health, Law and Medicine Blog

Saturday, June 11th, 2011

 

A Word of Special Thanks…

From the Editor:

I am so grateful to my bloggers and friends at the firm for all their hard work this week. I started a  multi-week trial this past Tuesday, but in my absence, the Eye Opener kept rolling right along thanks to them. Special thanks to Jason Penn, who took over the task of making sure the schedule was kept and the blogs got posted.

Brian Nash

 

From Jason Penn -

It is time to take a look back at the week that was.  With the temperatures soaring in the Baltimore-Washington area, the Eye Opener did its best to keep pace with the thermometer.  Five posts, five days.  All while the lawyers prepared for upcoming trials.  Not too shabby, if you ask me.  Without further ado, lets take a look at retrospective look:

The Death of a Baby – Economic Realities

By: Michael Sanders

The loss of a child, particularly an infant, is one of the most difficult and painful horrors anyone could every have to deal with.  Writing about it isn’t much easier.  Nonetheless, on Monday, blawger Michael Sanders’ post provided insight into the economics of lawsuits involving the death of an unborn child.  It is truly a “must read” for anyone that is contemplating taking legal action for the loss of their child.  The interplay between gestation, age of death and so-called “survival actions” is particularly tricky.  Mike lays out Maryland’s law on the topic and gives helpful primer for parent and practitioner alike.  Read more

Can A Simple Image Guide Nutrition?

By: Sarah Keogh

Obesity in America, particularly among our youth is a serious problem.  The problem itself certainly isn’t new but the approaches to promote healthy eating certainly have been. On Tuesday, Sara Keough pulled up to the table and reviewed the new MyPlate image and its impact on America’s unhealthy eating habits.  As I am sure you know, there have been a variety of methods to improve our nation’s eating habits. In most recent memory is the ostracized food pyramid and the First Lady’s “Let’s Move Campaign” (and associated dance moves). Sara provided her perspective on the new eating tool as both an individual and a parent.  I personally am curious: for the parents out there, will this change the way you handle your children’s nutrition?  Read more

Legal Boot Camp (Class Three): Sean and Kristy’s Story – Wrongful Death and Survival Actions

By: Jon Stefanuca

On Wednesday, Jon Stefanuca provided the third installment of our Legal Boot Camp. With class in session, Jon presented the following scenario:  Last month, Sean turned 24.  He and Kristy are married. Their daughter, Kira, is 2-years old. Sean just entered medical school. Kristy’s parents support them, while Sean is in school.  Sean has never held a job.  Kristy is a stay at home mom. A month ago, Sean was driving home when a drunk driver pushed him off the road. In the accident, Sean broke his sternum. He also sustained a number of vascular injuries, which caused internal bleeding. He was rushed to the nearest hospital. Soon after his arrival, Sean underwent surgery to stop the bleeding.

Sean was recovering beautifully. Unfortunately, on his third day in the hospital, he developed rapid breathing, shortness of breath, and his chest pain got worse. A CT scan of the chest revealed that Sean had a pulmonary embolism. The physician ordered 100 mg of anticoagulation medication.  The nurse misread the order and made a mistake in its administration. The overdose caused Sean to have extensive bleeding. Sean was scheduled for discharge within the next 3 days. Instead, he died within a few hours.

What legal action could Kristy take?  Read more

Dealing with Cerebral Palsy: A Resource for Parents and Family (Part II)

By: Jason Penn

On Thursday, Jason Penn provided us with Part II of his series “Dealing with Cerebral Palsy:  A Resource for Parents and Family.”  Part II of the series takes a look at educating children with cerebral palsy.  Children that have special needs that impact his/her ability to learn at school often qualify for an Individual Education Plan.

An IEP is a legal document created to ensure your child’s teacher, staff and administration understands his learning and other limitations and utilizes the best practices to ensure that he gets the education that he/she deserves.  Curious about an IEP?  Read more

How Much Is Your Marriage Worth?

By: Michael Sanders

To finish up the week, Michael Sanders returned, and asked the question: What is Your Marriage Worth?  If you’re married, there is category of damages that you may be able to recover – damage to your marriage. It’s called Loss of Consortium and is an important element of damages in the right circumstances. It is a legal recognition that the marital relationship itself – separate and apart from the injury to the individual – is a protected interest that is deserving of compensation if it has been harmed by the negligence of another person.  Read more…

Sneak Peak of the Week Ahead:

With the weather taking a turn for the better (hopefully), and the local sports teams showing renewed vigor, we are going to keep up the pace. As you finish up this week, and turn to the next, you can look forward to the following:

  • Service dogs for children:  more than just a pet
  • Subdural Hemorrhages – “Man, is my head aching…”
  • HIV Patients:  Increased risk for developing cancer
  • Crib bumpers & safety
  • Legal Boot Camp is back in session and Part III of our Cerebral Palsy tutorial.

Have a safe weekend, Everyone!

Week in Review: (May 29 – June 4, 2001) Eye Opener Health, Law and Medicine Blog

Saturday, June 4th, 2011

From the Editor:

We didn’t get to post as many blogs as usual this past week due to the simple fact that our lawyers/blawgers were spread around the country doing depositions and meetings, in court and getting ready for some major trials coming up very soon.

Sometimes the real practice of law (which is what we do when we’re not on WordPress blawging away) just gets in the way (read – big smiley face).

Brian Nash

 

Here’s what our blawgers wrote this past week. We hope you enjoy! Oh – thanks for stopping by too.

Summer Vacation Checklist: Add Vaccination to Your List

By: Theresa Neumann

Ahhh, summer vacation is coming. Passport? Airline tickets? Three 1oz containers? Zipper-lock bag? Sunblock? Camera? Vaccination status?

Summer is typically the busiest time for vacationers to explore new territories, or even old ones. Granted, the economy has replaced some travelers’ grand plans with much more modest ones, but many are still planning trips to Mexico and other foreign destinations. The summer is also a big time for missionary groups to head to under-served areas to provide assistance and medical care. The events of September 11th have forever changed travel for the United States and countries all over the world. There is now a new concern…..your vaccination status! Read more

The Grief of Losing an Unborn Child

By: Mike Sanders

For parents who have lost an unborn child, the sense of grief is no different than if the child had been born and then died. Unfortunately, our society seems less sympathetic to the loss because there is no infant that we have seen and gotten to know. We all recognize the agony of losing an older child. Even if we haven’t experienced it ourselves, we can at least try to understand how sickeningly awful it must be. We can then offer our support and love and condolences to those who have experienced it. With an unborn child, however, it’s different. We have a tendency to minimize the grief associated with losing an unborn child, as if the fact that the child wasn’t yet born makes him or her less real. Even medical providers are guilty of this. I’ve had women tell me that their doctors tend to treat miscarriage or stillbirth as a medical condition, not the loss of a loved one. For the parents of such children, however, the loss is deep and real and long-lasting. Read more

Legal Boot Camp: The Story of Mark and Susan – Common Law Marriage in Maryland

By: Jason Penn

Mark and Susan had been living together in a small apartment in Baltimore for 12 years. Both of their names were on the lease and they share a used car to commute back and forth to their jobs. Both names appeared on the utility bills and although they never had an actual “ceremony,” they always considered themselves to be husband and wife. Mark and Susan always assumed that the state of Maryland would consider their relationship to be a “common law marriage.” Ten months ago, Susan began experiencing unfamiliar stomach pains. Her doctor assured her that she was fine and that no follow-up examinations were necessary. Six months ago, Susan was diagnosed with an aggressive form of cancer. Tragically, Susan died last week. Mark is certain that Susan was the victim of medical malpractice and wants to file an action for medical malpractice. Mark is now concerned that his common law marriage might not be valid.  Is it? Read more

Home Births: Increasingly Popular But Are They Safe?

By: Sarah Keogh

Many little girls grow up fantasizing about what they want to be when they grow up; perhaps they want to be the President, or an artist, or a doctor, or an architect. Others might be daydreaming about being a princess or an astronaut. However, I do not know of many little girls who grow up dreaming about how they would like to bring a child into this world. Yet once these girls grow up into adults, many of them feel strongly about having a birth plan that is just as magical as all of their other dreams. Images of a comfortable labor or a display of womanly strength may play a role; perhaps they want music or a particular image available to them. Some want as few interventions as possible, while others would prefer an epidural at the hospital door. No matter what vision of childbirth a woman has, the desired end result is almost universally a healthy child. Read more ….

Sneak Peak of the Week Ahead

  • Two Sessions (yes, it’s almost summer) of our Legal Boot Camp Series –
  • Parents of children with Cerebral Palsy – Part II
  • Loss of Consortium – some things about this claim you need to understand
  • ….AND even more….

Have a Great Weekend, Everyone!

Summer Vacation Checklist: Add Vaccination to Your List!

Monday, May 30th, 2011

Photo from guardian.co.uk

Ahhh, summer vacation is coming. Passport? Airline tickets? Three 1oz containers? Zipper-lock bag? Sunblock? Camera? Vaccination status?

Summer is typically the busiest time for vacationers to explore new territories, or even old ones. Granted, the economy has replaced some travelers’ grand plans with much more modest ones, but many are still planning trips to Mexico and other foreign destinations. The summer is also a big time for missionary groups to head to underserved areas to provide assistance and medical care. The events of September 11th have forever changed travel for the United States and countries all over the world. There is now a new concern…..your vaccination status!

According to the Centers for Disease Control, the United States is experiencing its largest outbreak of measles in 15 years! USA Today reported a record 118 cases of confirmed measles in the USA between January 1 and May 20 of this year, mostly acquired abroad by unvaccinated individuals and brought back to the States. Measles was reported to have been “eradicated” from the USA as of the year 2000 due mostly to the efforts of immunization, but measles is still prevalent in other parts of the world.

Over 42,000 cases were diagnosed in an outbreak among young adults in Brazil in 1997! Third-world countries are not the only ones affected; over 7,500 cases have been diagnosed in France between January and March of this year, according to the CDC! And the outbreaks continue across most countries of Europe. Failure to vaccinate and receive periodic “booster shots” to provide immunity allows the virus to infect that individual who then gets sick. Since the virus is spread via respiratory droplets (coughing and sneezing), public modes of transportation allow for contact with infected individuals.

Measles is NOT just a rash!

According to the Associated Press, 2 of every 5 of these 118 patients required hospitalization; none died, but measles can have deadly consequences. Worldwide, measles causes nearly 800,000 deaths annually, mostly in small children. Some of the bad consequences include encephalitis characterized by vomiting, seizures, coma and even death; of those who survive this, approximately one-third are left with permanent neurologic deficits.

Once the spots are gone…

Interestingly, there is a late complication of measles infection, called subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE), that occurs from 5 to 15 years after the acute infection; the virus causes a slow degeneration of the brain and central nervous system long after the initial infection. Measles can also cause bronchiolitis or bronchopneumonia, and it can be associated with secondary bacterial infections due to the depleted immune system that occurs while fighting the virus.

Measles is NOT the only vaccine-preventable disease available for infection!

There have been recent outbreaks of mumps, another viral disease that has potential complications of pancreatitis, orchitis and even meningitis and encephalitis.

There have been outbreaks of Bordetella pertussis (part of the DPT vaccine), otherwise known as “whooping cough.” Pertussis can severely affect young children under 2 years, but it affects adults as well. Since the vaccine does not impart lifelong immunity, adults become a reservoir for this disease, unless a booster shot is given, and the adults spread the disease to unvaccinated children.

Haemophilus influenza type B, known as HIB, can cause typical cases of upper respiratory infections, sinusitis and otitis media (common ear infection); it can also cause epiglottitis, a potentially fatal infection of the epiglottis. The epiglottis is a flap of tissue that acts like a valve, protecting our airway when we eat and swallow food. This “valve” swells up so large from the infection that it can totally obstruct the airway and prevent a child from breathing; it is a medical emergency that can require emergent tracheostomy! An HIB vaccine has been available for years, and this infectious culprit had nearly been eradicated, as well, in the USA. The anti-vaccine movement has produced many children, adolescents and even young adults who have never received this vaccine  - et voila….there is a resurgence of HIB and Haemophilus epiglottitis.

Hepatitis B is a virus (HBV) for which a vaccine has also been available for over 20 years. It is a 3-shot regimen, but it also requires that titers be drawn after vaccination to prove immunity. HBV can be transmitted through sexual contact or any exchange of body fluids, including contaminated food in rare instances. Although the human body can fight some cases of HBV, other cases become chronic and lead to liver failure and/or liver cancer. Wouldn’t you know it? May is “Hepatitis Awareness Month” for the CDC!

There are plenty more vaccines available for a multitude of viral, bacterial and other infectious agents. Additionally, there are immunoglobulin shots that can address other infectious conditions and act as prophylaxis during your time abroad.

The Moral of the Story

Check your own vaccination status first. If you are not sure, your doctor can do blood tests to determine if you are immune to specific infectious agents…even the chicken pox virus! Secondly, take the time to check the CDC website (www.cdc.gov) for infections endemic to the area to which you are traveling. Follow guidelines offered for disease prevention and possible vaccines, medications or immunoglobulins available.

Be aware and be prepared! Protect yourself and those near and dear to you!

 

Week in Review: (May 22 – 28, 2011) The Eye Opener Health, Law and Medicine Blog

Saturday, May 28th, 2011

From the Editor – Brian Nash

Last week’s posts by our blawgers were packed with information about a variety of topics ranging from the medicine you need to know about concussions, living with cancer, cerebral palsy resources and the potential risks of overdosing your child with medications.

On the legal front, we began a series I’m personally excited about. We call it Legal Boot Camp. It will be a series for those in our practice jurisdictions of Maryland and Washington, D.C. Our teacher’s face is on – lesson plans in place. We hope you learn some things about the laws that can affect your lives in the areas of personal injury – particularly medical malpractice law.  Our first class took place with a piece by Sarah Keogh that examines the law in Maryland on the right to claim loss/diminished earning capacity. If you’re wondering if you can have such a claim even if you weren’t working when you were injured, Sarah has some information for you. Check it out. Turn in your class card and have some fun.

We wrapped up the week with a piece by yours truly on a wonderful community outreach program by our local baseball heroes, the Baltimore Orioles. Aptly named – OriolesREACH, this initiative has a number of wonderful events, charities and missions that are worth knowing about. One in particular, Shannon’s Fund, is a great program to help those in need while dealing with the financial burdens while dealing with cancer. It is run by the University of Maryland Medical Center. Read about our challenge to our brethren before the bar in the Greater Baltimore Area.

Without further ado, here are the blogs we posted this past week …. and a sneak peak of the week ahead.

Concussions: The Message of Brian Roberts’ Injury Should Not Go Unheeded

Posted by Brian Nash

Anyone who follows sports is well aware that finally the old school mentality of “gut it out and get back in there” following blows to the head are coming (not too soon) to an end. Committees have been formed, articles written and the national spotlight of the media have finally focused on this issue. Those recommendations, debates and guidelines are beyond the scope of this post. Nevertheless, those involved in sports…Read more >

Children’s Medications: Coming Changes and Tips to Avoid Overdose

Posted by Sarah Keogh

My children are both young; the youngest is now a little past her second birthday. In the last few years, we have had both infant and children medication in the house, liquid and tablets, and I have been very careful to make sure to double-check myself if I ever have to medicate either child to make sure that I am reading the correct dosing matrix for the correct concentration and for the correct child. More often than not, I have found that children need medication when their parents are tired. As parents know – children frequently…Read more >

 

Living With Cancer: What to Expect After the Diagnosis

Posted by Jon Stefanuca

About a million and a half people will be diagnosed with cancer in the U.S. this year. The devastating truth about cancer is that about one-third of these people will die from cancer at some point. For most, the diagnosis is unexpected and completely overwhelming.The cancer does not just affect how one feels, it undermines all sense of security and stability. It changes lifestyles and redefines relationships. So often the emotional trauma is equally shared among family members and loved ones. Read more >

New Blog Series: Legal Boot Camp

Posted by Brian Nash

I’m really pleased to announce a new series we’re starting today. If you’re a reader of our blog, you know that we post numerous times a week on health, safety, medicine and related law topics. That’s what we do in our firm – we represent people who are injured by the negligence of health care providers and those who suffer catastrophic injuries in non-medical settings as well. So, sharing what we believe is some good information about medical, health and safety issues is our mission. We strongly believe that our social networking should be about giving good information, engaging in dialogue about relevant issues – just plain good, old sharing. Read more >

Legal Boot Camp (First Class): The Story of Pam – Maryland’s Law on Loss of Earning Capacity

Posted by Sarah Keogh

A 41-year-old woman, Pam, who was laid off from her job as a swimming instructor and swim coach in December of 2009, has been struggling to find a new position for the last few years. Even though Pam had been working as a swimming instructor full-time for the past 18 years, she felt that she needed to jump into a new career while waiting to find a new position as a swimming instructor and coach. Starting in October of 2010, her father died leaving her a rundown home that he had recently purchased with the intent of renovating it. Pam felt that she could put her physical fitness and knowledge of home aesthetics to work, not to mention the ideas she picked up watching renovations shows while unemployed, by renovating the home her father left… Read more >

Dealing with Cerebral Palsy: A Resource for Parents and Family

Posted by Jason Penn

Today’s society has become increasingly dependent on aggregators. We use a variety of methods to assemble and sort information so that we can easily consume it.  Mint.com and Quicken help with our finances and Google Reader helps to manage our online content. A quick search of the internet suggests that the parents of children withcerebral palsy do not yet have an objective aggregator of information to turn to.  Let’s consider this our attempt to provide parents in the Baltimore and Washington D.C. areas with a place to turn. Read more >

Charity Begins at Home: OriolesREACH Program Hits a Grand Slam with Us!

Posted by Brian Nash

I recently wrote a post about our local area charities and civic organizations who do so much for so many in our community. With that in mind, as I was happily reading the sports page in the warm glow of the Orioles’ 12th inning victory yesterday (5 in a row – Go O’s), I came across a piece about a new initiative for our military personnel by the Birds. While looking at the details of this worthy program, I noticed (ashamedly for the first time, I admit) a host of community programs being run by the Orioles. The team uses the name OriolesREACH for the community programs they sponsor, promote or fund. Read more >

Sneak Peak of the Week Ahead

Here’s a sampling of what’s coming next week on The Eye Opener: Views and Opinions from the Nash Community:

  • As families prepare for the upcoming holidays and summer vacation, Theresa Neumann has some important medical advice about what else needs to be included in your travel plans.
  • Legal Boot Camp: Prepare for our second class – get those pencils, pens, iPads and whatever else you need out and ready – there could be a pop quiz on next week’s primary on law.
  • What rights do babies-before-birth (fetal rights) have in our legal system? Do parents who lose a child just before birth have any rights of recovery? You’ll find out next week.
  • Home births are on the rise. Is that a good or a bad thing? Sarah Keogh weighs in on that issue in the coming edition of The Eye Opener

And….maybe even more to come…you can never tell….

Have a wonderful and safe Memorial Day Weekend. Best to All of You and Your Families and Friends from All of Us at Nash & Associates

Week in Review (April 16 – 20, 2011) The Eye Opener Health, Law and Medicine Blog

Saturday, May 21st, 2011

From the Editor (Brian Nash)

Another week of great posts (IMHO) by our blawgers. Apparently, I’m not the only one who thinks so since we have now surpassed 21,000 page views in the last 30 days. The number keeps rising. Our sincere gratitude to all our readers!

Our topics were once again quite varied. They spanned the law, health, science and medicine. We even had a piece on a local event – Marathon Kids. This piece is part of our new program to promote charities and civic organizations in our own backyard – Baltimore and Washington.

We try week in and week out to find topics of interest for you, our readers. If you ever have any suggestions for topics of interest to you, please leave a comment or send us an email or fill-out the contact form with your thoughts and suggestions. We’d love to hear from you.

Let’s get to it then. What did we cover this past week that you might be interested in reading? Take a look -

Why early settlement is a win-win for all

By: Michael Sanders

There is an old adage in the law that cases settle on the courthouse steps. There is a reason for that. When the parties are actually walking into court to try their case, they seem to suddenly recognize that there are significant risks to going to trial, and that there is serious money at stake. When you go to trial, only one side can win. The other side goes home a loser. Faced with such a stark outcome, both sides tend to become more reasonable in their assessment of their case and more willing to talk settlement. After all, despite all the years of experience that trial attorneys amass, no one can ever predict what a jury is going to do in any specific case. As one mediator I know likes to tell the litigants, going to court is like going to Vegas:  you roll the dice and you take your chances. Read more….

Milk from Mom: Effective in preventing common infant complication (NEC)

By: Jason Penn

The debate among parents regarding the use of human milk vs. formula wages on, but according to a recent study, you can chalk one up for the human body.  That study, headed by the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, concluded that premature babies fed human donor milk were less likely to develop the intestinal condition necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC).  Both sides has its advocates, willing to do battle at any time. When it comes to NEC, Mom’s milk has the decided advantage. Read more….

H.I.V. treatment advances, but what are the implications of terminating research early?

By: Sarah Keogh

Last week, I read some exciting news about H.I.V. treatment and transmission. A New York Times article reported that a large clinical trial found that “[p]eople infected with the virus that causes AIDS are far less likely to infect their sexual partners if they are put on treatment immediately instead of waiting until their immune systems begin to deteriorate…” The study found that “[p]atients with H.I.V. were 96 percent less likely to pass on the infection if they were taking antiretroviral drugs…” These findings are overwhelmingly positive and the implication for public health is huge. Read more….

A Windy, Rainy but Fabulous Day in Baltimore: Marathon Kids Final Mile Celebration

By: Rachel Leyko

Despite the wind and rain, this past Saturday I volunteered at the Marathon Kids Final Mile Celebration Event at Western Polytechnic High School in Northwest Baltimore.  I learned of the event through the Junior League of Baltimore and to be honest, prior to Saturday, I did not know much about the organization, its purpose or effect on the children it sought to serve.  However, after Saturday’s event, not only was I impressed with the purpose of Marathon Kids, but I saw firsthand the positive effect this program has had on the children who have participated. Read more….

Acquired Brain Injuries: Causes and Impact

By: Theresa Neumann

On the heels of Jason Penn’s blogregarding calling “911″ for signs of a possible stroke, I decided to introduce a variety of acquired brain injuries for further discussion in future blogs since damage to the brain results in some of the most catastrophic injuries possibly sustained by the human body with significant “collateral damage” for all of the friends and family involved in the individual’s life. Read more….


Sneak Peak of the Week Ahead

Some topics we’ll be covering next week…and then some…

  • You or someone you know has been diagnosed with cancer, now you have to deal with the horror. Jon Stefanuca will be writing a piece based on our experiences with a number of clients “living with cancer.”
  • Mike Sanders and I have both recently resolved cases involving families who have lost a child. Mike’s involved the death of a fetus very near term. He’ll share that story and the experience of the case with you.
  • Maybe those of you who have children with special needs are familiar with the local (Maryland and Washington, D.C.) resources to help you and your child. For those who may not be or just want to learn more, Jason Penn will be providing information on this next week.
  • You may have heard the recent news about labeling of certain medications for children. Sarah Keogh will report on this and also delve into some practical problems and issues that parents face every day in terms of medicating their children.
  • We’re going to begin a new series on exactly what is recoverable in our jurisdictions (Washington, D.C and Maryland) under what is known as the Survival Act and the Wrongful Death Act. We’ll be paying particular attention to issues involving what’s known as pecuniary benefits, loss wages and diminished earning capacity. Should be educational. We hope you enjoy it.

Have a great weekend, Everyone!

H.I.V. treatment advances, but what are the implications of terminating research early?

Wednesday, May 18th, 2011

Scientific Method; image from: scifiles.larc.nasa.gov

Last week, I read some exciting news about H.I.V. treatment and transmission. A New York Times article reported that a large clinical trial found that “[p]eople infected with the virus that causes AIDS are far less likely to infect their sexual partners if they are put on treatment immediately instead of waiting until their immune systems begin to deteriorate…” The study found that “[p]atients with H.I.V. were 96 percent less likely to pass on the infection if they were taking antiretroviral drugs…” These findings are overwhelmingly positive and the implication for public health is huge.

The study details are fascinating, particularly in regards to the results. For example:

The $73 million trial, known as HPTN 052, involved 1,763 couples in 13 cities on four continents. One member of each couple was infected with H.I.V.; the other was not. In half the couples, chosen at random, the infected partner was put on antiretroviral drugs as soon as he or she tested positive for the virus.

In the other half, the infected person started treatment only when his or her CD4 count — a measure of the immune system’s strength — dropped below 250 per cubic millimeter.

In 28 of the couples, the uninfected person became infected with the partner’s strain of the virus. Twenty-seven of those 28 infections took place in couples in which the partner who was infected first was not yet getting treatment.

What I found most interesting, however, was that the study was not completed. The reported findings were the preliminary results from the clinical trials. In fact, the article explained that “[t]he data was so convincing that the trial, scheduled to last until 2015, is effectively being ended early.”

The way these results were discovered and released during the course of the study was what intrigued me. Here’s how the study data was described:

“[U]nblinded” to an independent safety review panel, which is standard procedure in clinical trials. When the panel realized how much protection early treatment afforded, it recommended that drug regimens be offered to all participants. Although participants will still be followed, the trial is effectively over because it will no longer be a comparison between two groups on different regimens.

This means that the clinical trial was stopped before reaching completion so that all of the participating couples could receive treatment.

The implications of ending this trial short are complicated. For the participants, the decision can be nothing but positive since it may provide the study participants with the opportunity to receive treatment that could hopefully lead to a dramatically decreased likelihood of infection with a potentially deadly disease. For many others around the world who have a partner with H.I.V., the implications are likewise a boon for public health. The release of these early results may impact treatment of H.I.V. infected individuals around the world who may now be able to protect their partners from infection. However, the end of this study is not as clear-cut in terms of research and ethical implications as it might seem.

I originally became aware of the idea that clinical studies are sometimes cut short in the mid 1990s. My father, an occupational health doctor who died in 1999, was involved in the CARET studies during the 1990s. This large-scale double blind study was looking at whether beta-carotene and retinyl palmitate would be able to prevent lung cancer in heavy smokers and workers who had been exposed to asbestos.  However, the study was ended prematurely based on interim results that suggested an adverse affect on the study participants. Since I was only a high school student at the time that the trial was ended, I did not know many of the details at the time. I understood the basic idea that if a medical research study was causing harm to the participants, that it must be ended. When I read the recent news about the H.I.V. treatment study, it prompted me to try to learn more about how and when clinical studies are interrupted.

There was an article published called “Stopping the active intervention: CARET” that I found enlightening about how and why the CARET studies were ended.  The article provides an overview that I found helpful in thinking about the current H.I.V. study:

The optimal design of a randomized clinical intervention trial, where the outcome is a disease endpoint, includes a set of criteria for stopping the active intervention before planned. These criteria, called “stopping rules,” guide the review of findings by key study scientists and an independent set of reviewers. If the pattern of outcome, effect or harm, is large enough to be attributed to the intervention, the trial is halted, regardless of the planned completion date or the readiness of staff to end the trial.

While in the H.I.V. study, the impact was positive, rather than negative as in the CARET study, the procedure seems to be similar. A procedure in the study allowed for data to be unblinded and examined by an independent panel which then recommended that the trial be stopped early.

However, this does present two potential problems. One is that the study, scientifically speaking, did not reach its full conclusions. It may not provide as much evidence of implications as it might have if it had continued or if the study population had been larger. For example, the New York Times article mentioned the following:

Although the trial was relatively large, there are some limitations on interpreting the data.

More than 90 percent of the couples in the trial, who lived in Botswana, Brazil, India, Kenya, Malawi, South Africa, Thailand, the United States and Zimbabwe, were heterosexual.

“We would have liked to have a substantial number of men as potential study subjects, but they just weren’t interested,” Dr. Cohen said.

Although common sense suggests the results would be similar in the contexts of homosexual sex and sex between people who are not couples, strictly speaking, the results apply only to the type of people studied, Dr. Fauci said.

Another implication is that the results may not be as scientifically accurate if the trials are stopped early.  A study published in JAMA entitled “Stopping Randomized Trials Early for Benefit and Estimation of Treatment Effects: Systematic Review and Meta-regression Analysis” explains:

Although randomized controlled trials (RCTs) generally provide credible evidence of treatment effects, multiple problems may emerge when investigators terminate a trial earlier than planned, especially when the decision to terminate the trial is based on the finding of an apparently beneficial treatment effect. Bias may arise because large random fluctuations of the estimated treatment effect can occur, particularly early in the progress of a trial. When investigators stop a trial based on an apparently beneficial treatment effect, their results may therefore provide misleading estimates of the benefit. Statistical modeling suggests that RCTs stopped early for benefit (truncated RCTs) will systematically overestimate treatment effects, and empirical data demonstrate that truncated RCTs often show implausibly large treatment effects.

(internal footnotes omitted)

So, perhaps, if the trial were continued, the results would not have been as overwhelmingly positive. Perhaps the percentage of partners infected in the two groups would not have been as widely divergent. But perhaps they would – and would you want to gamble with someone’s life?

Have you ever been involved in a clinical research study that has been ended early? Was it for positive or negative results? What should be done to maximize public health and safety while still providing the benefits of full blind research studies?

 

A Windy, Rainy but Fabulous Day in Baltimore: Marathon Kids Final Mile Celebration

Tuesday, May 17th, 2011

Despite the wind and rain, this past Saturday I volunteered at the Marathon Kids Final Mile Celebration Event at Western Polytechnic High School in Northwest Baltimore.  I learned of the event through the Junior League of Baltimore and to be honest, prior to Saturday, I did not know much about the organization, its purpose or effect on the children it sought to serve.  However, after Saturday’s event, not only was I impressed with the purpose of Marathon Kids, but I saw firsthand the positive effect this program has had on the children who have participated.

What is “Marathon Kids”?

Marathon Kids is a fitness and nutrition program aimed at children in grades K through 5 in several cities throughout the country. Currently, Baltimore City is the only east coast location of this program.   Over the course of six months, students are required to run or walk 26.2 miles, eat five fruits and/or vegetables a day and record their progress. The program starts off with a Kick-Off Party and ends with a Final Mile Event. I was told by National Program Director, Marinda Reynolds, that 2300 Baltimore City students were present at the Kick-Off Event.  However, due to the inclement weather on Saturday, only several hundred students came to celebrate their Final Mile.

The Marathon Kids program seeks to fight the rising epidemic of Type II diabetes and obesity by teaching children at an early age how to engage in healthy physical activity and eating.  In talking with some of the parents during the event, I learned that the program had become more of a family activity with parents and children walking and striving to eat healthier foods together.  Impressive!  But most importantly, the kids who have completed this challenge had smiles from ear to ear as they crossed the finish line to get their medals and stickers (t-shirts were mailed to the schools individually).  It was an exciting day filled with lots of cheering and celebration so much so I almost forgot about the rain.

Want to “Kick In”?

One last great aspect of the Marathon Kids program is that it is entirely FREE for all participants thanks to corporate sponsors and donations.  Should you wish to sponsor and/or make a donation to this program, click HERE to donate now.