Posts Tagged ‘legal’

Skin Cancer Prevention: The Dangers of Tanning Beds

Friday, July 1st, 2011

 

Image from hometanningbed.com

In my last two posts, I have examined the various types of skin cancer, their prevalence and survivability rates, and some prevention methods. Today, I will focus on another major risk factor for skin cancer. The use of tanning beds or “indoor tanning” greatly increases a person’s risk of developing skin cancer. It is a completely voluntary exposure to UV radiation, and yet many people choose to expose themselves despite all of the risks.

Known Dangers of Tanning Beds

Here are just a few statistics about indoor tanning from the Skin Cancer Foundation:

  • “Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is a proven human carcinogen. Currently tanning beds are regulated by the FDA as Class I medical devices, the same designation given elastic bandages and tongue depressors.
  • The International Agency for Research on Cancer, an affiliate of the World Health Organization, includes ultraviolet (UV) tanning devices in its Group 1, a list of the most dangerous cancer-causing substances. Group 1 also includes agents such as plutonium, cigarettes, and solar UV radiation.
  • Frequent tanners using new high-pressure sunlamps may receive as much as 12 times the annual UVA dose compared to the dose they receive from sun exposure.
  • Ten minutes in a sunbed matches the cancer-causing effects of 10 minutes in the Mediterranean summer sun.
  • Nearly 30 million people tan indoors in the U.S. every year; 2.3 million of them are teens.
  • On an average day, more than one million Americans use tanning salons.
  • Seventy-one percent of tanning salon patrons are girls and women aged 16-29.
  • Indoor ultraviolet (UV) tanners are 74 percent more likely to develop melanoma than those who have never tanned indoors.
  • People who use tanning beds are 2.5 times more likely to develop squamous cell carcinoma and 1.5 times more likely to develop basal cell carcinoma.
  • The indoor tanning industry has an annual estimated revenue of $5 billion.”

Internal references omitted

 

Horrifically, it is mainly young people choosing to use these devices despite the greatly increased risk of melanoma and other skin cancers. Given the enormous financial incentive to service young people – the industry cannot be expected to regulate itself. If they can make $5 billion dollars a year in revenue with a largely young female population, why would they stop? (Aside from morality of course…)

How to Protect the Skin – Even if You Don’t Want To

From a social perspective, there need to be some changes to the value our society places on certain skin color and beauty. This is outside of the realm of this post – but what a shame that in this century, men and woman would still rather expose themselves to harmful radiation than live life with their natural coloring (or lack thereof).

From an education perspective, I think that public awareness and an increased focus on education must continue to be one prong to battle this problem. However, clearly warnings alone are not enough. This is exemplified by a recent news story about a now 23-year-old woman who visited tanning salons three to five times a week starting when she was 16 years old.  This young woman, who despite knowing the risks of tanning continued to use tanning beds until 2009, had to endure surgeries, drug therapies and over a year of painful treatment at the age of twenty-one for the advanced melanoma that had spread to her lymph nodes. Luckily, she is now cancer-free, but living with a greatly increased risk of developing another cancer. This is a cautionary tale, but it is also an example of the invincibility thinking of many young people that makes the risks seem lower than they really are to using tanning beds.

Legal Options – Regulation

So what remains? The tanning salon industry has a financial disincentive towards preventing skin cancers, the young patrons of these establishments may not understand the risks and consequences, yet the individuals and society are going to pay the price of devastating illness, high cost medical treatments and people’s lives if the current use of tanning beds continues. That is where the legal side of this post enters. There are a number of states that have started to regulate the use of these tanning beds – at least for minors. Most states do not regulate these very heavily. The National Conference of State Legislatures has compiled regulations from many states on their website. There are a combination of approaches which generally include either banning the use of tanning beds by very young children and teens (typically under 14 or 16 – but few states have an outright ban) and/or requiring parental consent for the use by children below a certain age (typically 18, occasionally 16). Some of these consent statutes require the parent to be present (in person) to provide consent. Others allow written consent or require the parent to be present only one time in the year. Do you think that these statutes are sufficient? Should the requirements involve vivid pictural warnings like the new requirements for cigarrettes?

In Maryland, Howard County is a leader in regulating this industry. In Howard County, minors under 18 years of age are not permitted to use tanning devices without a doctor’s note stating a medical reason and allowed frequency.  These rules are not subject to a parent’s consent. Many states legislators have proposed tougher legislation in the past few years to increase the regulations on this industry across the country, but few have been successful.

Your Thoughts?

What do you think should happen with the tanning industry? Do you think that there should be an outright ban for any minors using these devises? What about adults? There are still lots of tanning customers who are young adults who are over 18. What can be done to protect them from the increased risks of skin cancer? Is public education sufficient? Could it be done better?

Related Posts:

Skin Cancer: Types, Causes and How to Protect Yourself

Skin Cancer Prevention: Will New FDA Rules Help?

Skin Cancer Videos

 

New Blog Series:Legal Boot Camp

Thursday, May 26th, 2011

I’m really pleased to announce a new series we’re starting today. If you’re a reader of our blog, you know that we post numerous times a week on health, safety, medicine and related law topics. That’s what we do in our firm – we represent people who are injured by the negligence of health care providers and those who suffer catastrophic injuries in non-medical settings as well. So, sharing what we believe is some good information about medical, health and safety issues is our mission. We strongly believe that our social networking should be about giving good information, engaging in dialogue about relevant issues – just plain good, old sharing.

For well over a year now, we’ve been blogging away on these topics. No, we’re not doctors; we just happen to deal with medical, safety and health issues in our daily law practice. Our experience, which is a combined one of many decades (roughly over 75 years) of litigating personal injury and our sub-specialty of medical malpractice cases has given us some pretty good insights into how law and medicine intertwine.

What’s new then…?

We’ve said this so many times that I’ve lost any realistic count – an informed patient is one who can better serve their own health care and medical needs. Our “tips and tricks” have been designed to make our readers more educated in health and safety issues so that when they have a medical condition or need medical care or suffer serious injuries along the way, they are hopefully better equipped to get involved in dealing with their issues.

Well, now the time has come, we feel, to make our readers more educated in the laws that potentially affect their lives as well. Love lawyers or hate lawyers (or somewhere in between), there’s no escaping the reality that every one of us lives within a social framework of laws – some created by the common law and some by legislation. We want to offer you, our readers, some insights into what some of the laws are that can possibly affect you in the field of personal injury and medical malpractice. A better educated client is our goal and our new add-on mission. We’ll keep trying to put good, new content out there for you about health, medicine and safety. It’s our bread and butter of social networking. Since we’re lawyers, however, we figured – hey, why not share some information and insights about the law with you as well. You won’t even get a tuition bill in the mail – what a deal!

What will be discussing that might interest you?

First I need to be clear on the scope of what we’ll be discussing. Our lawyers are admitted in Maryland and Washington, D.C. Sure, we occasionally will seek permission from courts in other states to appear before them through a procedure known as pro hac vice – (okay – check out the link if you want – you just had your first mini-law-lesson).Those cases are, of necessity, few and far between. We’re pretty darn busy helping people in our own backyard(s)- D.C. and Maryland. So, with that in mind, we’re going to gear our posts for the Legal Boot Camp to legal issues in Maryland and Washington, D.C. If you don’t live in one of these beautiful places, you might want to have a “read” anyway. Needless to say, laws can vary tremendously from one jurisdiction to another. The legal issues, however, are many times common to all. The answers are often what vary. Central to any civil lawsuit for personal injury or medical malpractice case might be issues such as what is a statute of limitations?, or what is a statute of repose?, or what’s the difference between them?, or what damages are recoverable in a personal injury lawsuit, or what is meant by “the standard of care” in a medical malpractice case? or what really is a common law marriage? and on and on and on.

The Disclaimer

Yeah, you had to know one was coming. Hey, we are lawyers!

If you didn’t know, we can’t offer you legal advice in a blog, tweet or Facebook post. We can, however, share some of our knowledge of issues that just might impact you. No, just by reading our posts we do not have an attorney-client relationship. OK…got it? I suspect you do, so let’s move on.

Our “Legal Boot Camp” Format

For those of you who haven’t been to law school, let me start by sharing the typical way a class in law school would go – at least when I was there a few years ago. Yes, we had real, electric lights way back then and were not limited to studying by the glow of a fireplace or candle.

The assignments in whatever class you were taking were pretty much the same. Read a case or two (in torts, contracts, corporations, etc.). When you came to class, be prepared to “present” the following: (a) the facts of the case, (b) the issues of the case and (c) the holding(s) of the case. From there the discussion would take off. Well, since this style of legal education seems to have worked for quite a few of my fellow lawyers, that’s what we’re typically going to do.

The facts….and only the facts…

We’ll be giving you a fact pattern so you can see the issue and the law in a factual context. Politicians now like to give you a story first for their message. Why not us? The facts for our posts will sometimes be from cases we’ve handled or are currently working on (all identifying information will be deleted or modified for a host of reasons). Sometimes we’ll make our fact pattern as a composite from various cases we’ve handled. We hope you’ll find that they’re done in such a way as to make the issues and the legal holdings more understandable.

So, hand in your class attendance card; let’s have some fun!

We’re starting off this series with a post by Sarah Keogh, which I’ll post right after I hit “publish” on this announcement piece. Sarah tells the story of Pam, who was a swimming instructor before she was injured during a simple surgical procedure at a local Maryland hospital. What rights and claims does Pam have for her lost wages – even if she wasn’t making a whole lot, if anything – at the time of her surgery? Does she have any or is she flat out of luck for the rest of her days? Read the facts, figure out the “issue,” and learn some law.

Before you head over to your first class on Maryland law, here’s a tip. If you want to follow the course and would like easy access to our lessons, you can go to our search bar on the main blog page and just type in “Legal Boot Camp.” We’re also going to tag our Twitter posts in this series with the designation #LBC. Ok…now hand in your card and get your free legal education.