Posts Tagged ‘living with cancer’

Week in Review: (May 22 – 28, 2011) The Eye Opener Health, Law and Medicine Blog

Saturday, May 28th, 2011

From the Editor – Brian Nash

Last week’s posts by our blawgers were packed with information about a variety of topics ranging from the medicine you need to know about concussions, living with cancer, cerebral palsy resources and the potential risks of overdosing your child with medications.

On the legal front, we began a series I’m personally excited about. We call it Legal Boot Camp. It will be a series for those in our practice jurisdictions of Maryland and Washington, D.C. Our teacher’s face is on – lesson plans in place. We hope you learn some things about the laws that can affect your lives in the areas of personal injury – particularly medical malpractice law.  Our first class took place with a piece by Sarah Keogh that examines the law in Maryland on the right to claim loss/diminished earning capacity. If you’re wondering if you can have such a claim even if you weren’t working when you were injured, Sarah has some information for you. Check it out. Turn in your class card and have some fun.

We wrapped up the week with a piece by yours truly on a wonderful community outreach program by our local baseball heroes, the Baltimore Orioles. Aptly named – OriolesREACH, this initiative has a number of wonderful events, charities and missions that are worth knowing about. One in particular, Shannon’s Fund, is a great program to help those in need while dealing with the financial burdens while dealing with cancer. It is run by the University of Maryland Medical Center. Read about our challenge to our brethren before the bar in the Greater Baltimore Area.

Without further ado, here are the blogs we posted this past week …. and a sneak peak of the week ahead.

Concussions: The Message of Brian Roberts’ Injury Should Not Go Unheeded

Posted by Brian Nash

Anyone who follows sports is well aware that finally the old school mentality of “gut it out and get back in there” following blows to the head are coming (not too soon) to an end. Committees have been formed, articles written and the national spotlight of the media have finally focused on this issue. Those recommendations, debates and guidelines are beyond the scope of this post. Nevertheless, those involved in sports…Read more >

Children’s Medications: Coming Changes and Tips to Avoid Overdose

Posted by Sarah Keogh

My children are both young; the youngest is now a little past her second birthday. In the last few years, we have had both infant and children medication in the house, liquid and tablets, and I have been very careful to make sure to double-check myself if I ever have to medicate either child to make sure that I am reading the correct dosing matrix for the correct concentration and for the correct child. More often than not, I have found that children need medication when their parents are tired. As parents know – children frequently…Read more >

 

Living With Cancer: What to Expect After the Diagnosis

Posted by Jon Stefanuca

About a million and a half people will be diagnosed with cancer in the U.S. this year. The devastating truth about cancer is that about one-third of these people will die from cancer at some point. For most, the diagnosis is unexpected and completely overwhelming.The cancer does not just affect how one feels, it undermines all sense of security and stability. It changes lifestyles and redefines relationships. So often the emotional trauma is equally shared among family members and loved ones. Read more >

New Blog Series: Legal Boot Camp

Posted by Brian Nash

I’m really pleased to announce a new series we’re starting today. If you’re a reader of our blog, you know that we post numerous times a week on health, safety, medicine and related law topics. That’s what we do in our firm – we represent people who are injured by the negligence of health care providers and those who suffer catastrophic injuries in non-medical settings as well. So, sharing what we believe is some good information about medical, health and safety issues is our mission. We strongly believe that our social networking should be about giving good information, engaging in dialogue about relevant issues – just plain good, old sharing. Read more >

Legal Boot Camp (First Class): The Story of Pam – Maryland’s Law on Loss of Earning Capacity

Posted by Sarah Keogh

A 41-year-old woman, Pam, who was laid off from her job as a swimming instructor and swim coach in December of 2009, has been struggling to find a new position for the last few years. Even though Pam had been working as a swimming instructor full-time for the past 18 years, she felt that she needed to jump into a new career while waiting to find a new position as a swimming instructor and coach. Starting in October of 2010, her father died leaving her a rundown home that he had recently purchased with the intent of renovating it. Pam felt that she could put her physical fitness and knowledge of home aesthetics to work, not to mention the ideas she picked up watching renovations shows while unemployed, by renovating the home her father left… Read more >

Dealing with Cerebral Palsy: A Resource for Parents and Family

Posted by Jason Penn

Today’s society has become increasingly dependent on aggregators. We use a variety of methods to assemble and sort information so that we can easily consume it.  Mint.com and Quicken help with our finances and Google Reader helps to manage our online content. A quick search of the internet suggests that the parents of children withcerebral palsy do not yet have an objective aggregator of information to turn to.  Let’s consider this our attempt to provide parents in the Baltimore and Washington D.C. areas with a place to turn. Read more >

Charity Begins at Home: OriolesREACH Program Hits a Grand Slam with Us!

Posted by Brian Nash

I recently wrote a post about our local area charities and civic organizations who do so much for so many in our community. With that in mind, as I was happily reading the sports page in the warm glow of the Orioles’ 12th inning victory yesterday (5 in a row – Go O’s), I came across a piece about a new initiative for our military personnel by the Birds. While looking at the details of this worthy program, I noticed (ashamedly for the first time, I admit) a host of community programs being run by the Orioles. The team uses the name OriolesREACH for the community programs they sponsor, promote or fund. Read more >

Sneak Peak of the Week Ahead

Here’s a sampling of what’s coming next week on The Eye Opener: Views and Opinions from the Nash Community:

  • As families prepare for the upcoming holidays and summer vacation, Theresa Neumann has some important medical advice about what else needs to be included in your travel plans.
  • Legal Boot Camp: Prepare for our second class – get those pencils, pens, iPads and whatever else you need out and ready – there could be a pop quiz on next week’s primary on law.
  • What rights do babies-before-birth (fetal rights) have in our legal system? Do parents who lose a child just before birth have any rights of recovery? You’ll find out next week.
  • Home births are on the rise. Is that a good or a bad thing? Sarah Keogh weighs in on that issue in the coming edition of The Eye Opener

And….maybe even more to come…you can never tell….

Have a wonderful and safe Memorial Day Weekend. Best to All of You and Your Families and Friends from All of Us at Nash & Associates

Living With Cancer: What to Expect After the Diagnosis

Wednesday, May 25th, 2011

Alicia Staley - Cancer Survivor - Visual (Image from her site - awesomecancersurvivor.com

About a million and a half people will be diagnosed with cancer in the U.S. this year. The devastating truth about cancer is that about one-third of these people will die from cancer at some point. For most, the diagnosis is unexpected and completely overwhelming.The cancer does not just affect how one feels, it undermines all sense of security and stability. It changes lifestyles and redefines relationships. So often the emotional trauma is equally shared among family members and loved ones.

Needless to say, the original cancer diagnosis marks the beginning of a difficult, frightening and frustrating experience. For this reason, it is critical not to despair. One must always remain hopeful, adjust, and prepare for the way to recovery. A fundamental step in this process is gaining an understanding and familiarity with the impending medical treatment and associated lifestyle changes. A good deal of stress can be avoided by simply understanding what to expect. While cancer treatment varies depending on the type of cancer and the individual characteristics of the patient, the patient should generally be aware of the following:

Chemotherapy

The vast majority of cancer patients will receive some degree of chemotherapy. This may consist of one or more chemotherapy cycles.  Each cycle can be as long as 3-6 months. Chemotherapy involves the administration of various chemical agents called antineoplastic drugs in order to stop cancerous cells from dividing. Antineoplastic drugs are designed to attack and kill cells that divide in an uncontrolled or rapid matter. Antineoplastic drugs, however, are not able to discriminate between cancerous cells and normal cells. Therefore, cells that divide rapidly as part of their normal life cycle are also attacked. Chemotherapy may cure the cancer entirely or control its growth. Many times, chemotherapy is used in conjunction with other treatments. Some associated complications of chemotherapy include:

  • Anemia
  • Hair Loss
  • Lethargy
  • Nausea and loss of appetite
  • Kidney damage
  • Liver damage
  • Heart damage
  • Deterioration of pre-existing medical conditions such as osteoarthritis, among other things.

Radiation Therapy

In addition to chemotherapy, a patient may also receive radiation therapy. Radiation therapy involves exposing cancerous tissue to ionizing radiation (electromagnetic waves), which tends to destabilize the molecular structure of cancerous cells. In essence, the electromagnetic waves will ionize the atoms of the cancerous cells, by displacing electrons within the inherent structure of the atom. In turn, this process destabilizes the molecules of the cancerous cells, causing them to die.

Surgery

In a number of instances, cancer patients will also require surgery to treat their cancer. Often times, the malignant tumor is identifiable and localized (as opposed to metastasized). In such instances, timely surgery is preferred. Chemotherapy of radiation therapy may follow the surgery. The type of surgery  will vary depending on the type of cancer and how advanced it is. For example, a woman with ovarian cancer will likely undergo a total hysterectomy, including the removal of the ovaries. A patient with intestinal cancer may undergo a laparotomy with dissection of the cancerous tissue. Generally speaking, the sooner the cancer is identified, the less extensive the surgery.

Monitoring

After surgery and chemotherapy/radiation therapy, each cancer patient/cancer survivor should establish a systematic and well developed course of monitoring and supportive care with his/her physician. This will often involve a number of other health care providers such as physicians, nurses, and physical therapists. For example, a patient who has undergone treatment for ovarian cancer may require monitoring by an oncologist, a surgical oncologist, an internist (primary care physician), a gynecologist, and even a urologist. One must then factor in the extent to which the cancer treatment resulted in additional complications or the extent to which pre-existing medical conditions deteriorated as a result of the cancer treatment. As such, the patient may require the involvement of additional specialists to address and monitor the side effects of the cancer treatment. It is very important that the patient maintain a healthy nutrition and exercise regimen, if and as prescribed by the physician.

The bottom line is that cancer patients will invariably have a long and difficult road to recovery, which may take months or even years. Drastic lifestyle changes may be necessary, and patience as well as perseverance are essential. A cancer patient must know what to expect and be proactive to create support structures involving health care providers and family members/loved ones.

Helping Others in Need

If you or someone you know is a cancer patient/survivor, I encourage you to share your story with our readers. What helped you most to cope and persevere on your way to recovery?

Related Posts:

Ovarian Cancer: Five Tips to Get the Medical Care You Need

Ovarian Cancer: Early Intervention is Key – What You Must Know…

Breast Cancer: What You Need to Know About Digital vs. Film Mammograms

Warning to Women of Menopausal Age: HRT Linked to Increase in Death From Breast Cancer