Posts Tagged ‘nutrition’

Week in Review: (June 6 – June 10, 2011) Eye Opener Health, Law and Medicine Blog

Saturday, June 11th, 2011

 

A Word of Special Thanks…

From the Editor:

I am so grateful to my bloggers and friends at the firm for all their hard work this week. I started a  multi-week trial this past Tuesday, but in my absence, the Eye Opener kept rolling right along thanks to them. Special thanks to Jason Penn, who took over the task of making sure the schedule was kept and the blogs got posted.

Brian Nash

 

From Jason Penn -

It is time to take a look back at the week that was.  With the temperatures soaring in the Baltimore-Washington area, the Eye Opener did its best to keep pace with the thermometer.  Five posts, five days.  All while the lawyers prepared for upcoming trials.  Not too shabby, if you ask me.  Without further ado, lets take a look at retrospective look:

The Death of a Baby – Economic Realities

By: Michael Sanders

The loss of a child, particularly an infant, is one of the most difficult and painful horrors anyone could every have to deal with.  Writing about it isn’t much easier.  Nonetheless, on Monday, blawger Michael Sanders’ post provided insight into the economics of lawsuits involving the death of an unborn child.  It is truly a “must read” for anyone that is contemplating taking legal action for the loss of their child.  The interplay between gestation, age of death and so-called “survival actions” is particularly tricky.  Mike lays out Maryland’s law on the topic and gives helpful primer for parent and practitioner alike.  Read more

Can A Simple Image Guide Nutrition?

By: Sarah Keogh

Obesity in America, particularly among our youth is a serious problem.  The problem itself certainly isn’t new but the approaches to promote healthy eating certainly have been. On Tuesday, Sara Keough pulled up to the table and reviewed the new MyPlate image and its impact on America’s unhealthy eating habits.  As I am sure you know, there have been a variety of methods to improve our nation’s eating habits. In most recent memory is the ostracized food pyramid and the First Lady’s “Let’s Move Campaign” (and associated dance moves). Sara provided her perspective on the new eating tool as both an individual and a parent.  I personally am curious: for the parents out there, will this change the way you handle your children’s nutrition?  Read more

Legal Boot Camp (Class Three): Sean and Kristy’s Story – Wrongful Death and Survival Actions

By: Jon Stefanuca

On Wednesday, Jon Stefanuca provided the third installment of our Legal Boot Camp. With class in session, Jon presented the following scenario:  Last month, Sean turned 24.  He and Kristy are married. Their daughter, Kira, is 2-years old. Sean just entered medical school. Kristy’s parents support them, while Sean is in school.  Sean has never held a job.  Kristy is a stay at home mom. A month ago, Sean was driving home when a drunk driver pushed him off the road. In the accident, Sean broke his sternum. He also sustained a number of vascular injuries, which caused internal bleeding. He was rushed to the nearest hospital. Soon after his arrival, Sean underwent surgery to stop the bleeding.

Sean was recovering beautifully. Unfortunately, on his third day in the hospital, he developed rapid breathing, shortness of breath, and his chest pain got worse. A CT scan of the chest revealed that Sean had a pulmonary embolism. The physician ordered 100 mg of anticoagulation medication.  The nurse misread the order and made a mistake in its administration. The overdose caused Sean to have extensive bleeding. Sean was scheduled for discharge within the next 3 days. Instead, he died within a few hours.

What legal action could Kristy take?  Read more

Dealing with Cerebral Palsy: A Resource for Parents and Family (Part II)

By: Jason Penn

On Thursday, Jason Penn provided us with Part II of his series “Dealing with Cerebral Palsy:  A Resource for Parents and Family.”  Part II of the series takes a look at educating children with cerebral palsy.  Children that have special needs that impact his/her ability to learn at school often qualify for an Individual Education Plan.

An IEP is a legal document created to ensure your child’s teacher, staff and administration understands his learning and other limitations and utilizes the best practices to ensure that he gets the education that he/she deserves.  Curious about an IEP?  Read more

How Much Is Your Marriage Worth?

By: Michael Sanders

To finish up the week, Michael Sanders returned, and asked the question: What is Your Marriage Worth?  If you’re married, there is category of damages that you may be able to recover – damage to your marriage. It’s called Loss of Consortium and is an important element of damages in the right circumstances. It is a legal recognition that the marital relationship itself – separate and apart from the injury to the individual – is a protected interest that is deserving of compensation if it has been harmed by the negligence of another person.  Read more…

Sneak Peak of the Week Ahead:

With the weather taking a turn for the better (hopefully), and the local sports teams showing renewed vigor, we are going to keep up the pace. As you finish up this week, and turn to the next, you can look forward to the following:

  • Service dogs for children:  more than just a pet
  • Subdural Hemorrhages – “Man, is my head aching…”
  • HIV Patients:  Increased risk for developing cancer
  • Crib bumpers & safety
  • Legal Boot Camp is back in session and Part III of our Cerebral Palsy tutorial.

Have a safe weekend, Everyone!

Can a Simple Image Guide Good Nutrition?

Tuesday, June 7th, 2011

Image from www.choosemyplate.gov

Last week, the USDA unveiled the new MyPlate image to replace the outdated food pyramid. When I first saw the new image, I felt a welcome relief at the simplicity of this concept. The plate seemed like the iPhone of the nutrition world. Simply and intuitively designed – replacing a complex chart of recommendations with something that even a busy person could use in their every day lives.

As an individual and as a parent, I have worked hard for the last 5 or more years to dramatically change the buying and eating habits in our household. We buy most of our food, at least during the months from May until November, at the farmer’s markets around town. We try to buy most of our meat, eggs and dairy products from local farms. For the food that we purchase from the supermarket or from restaurants, I make a conscious effort to buy mostly real foods that are not full of preservatives, additives or other unidentifiable ingredients. Despite these efforts, it can still be a challenge to make sure that my meals are nutritionally well rounded.

My favorite feature of the new design MyPlate is that it is accessible even to the youngest children. Most people in this country eat their meals off plates, or at least are familiar with them. The idea of how much food to put on the plate and in what proportions resonates with me. Perhaps this image will also have the secondary effect of acting as a wake-up call to any Americans who are currently eating their meals primarily on the go, in their cars, or as undefined snacks constantly throughout the day (“grazing” as my father used to call it in our house).

Secondary Benefit of the Plate Image? Perhaps People will Focus on Sitting Down to Meals

To me, the take home message in the new image is that the healthiest option is to eat real meals, sitting down, preferably with others. These meals should be loaded with vegetables and fruits, with the addition of grains and protein. I suspect that the new USDA plate does not look like the plates of most Americans today at the average meal. Many, myself included most of the time, eat meals with more grains or proteins covering the plate than vegetables or fruits most of the time. However, this seems like a very achievable change to make. As long as we can help people get access to vegetables and fruits (outside the scope of this post – but there have been plenty of things written about how much easier it is in this country to get cheap meats and carbs than fresh fruits and veggies), then it seems simple with this guide to adjust your plate to be half covered in vegetables and fruits each meal.

Easy Enough for Kids and Busy Parents

Image from Zazzle.com

The other reason I like this image, besides its simplicity, is that it is easy. A child could easily use this as a template to fill their plate. Moreover, there are already a ton of children’s plates on the market that are easily divided…perhaps there should be similar plates for adults – I suspect someone is marketing this as I type. In case you were worried, someone has already developed the “Bacon My Plate” items. But, the point is that if you are a harried parent in today’s busy world, you may be searching for easy healthy foods for your kids. Well, perhaps the answer is here, just make sure that you fill the plate according to the guidelines and voila – dinner is ready.

Entire USDA MyPlate Website Devoted to Tips and Tools

What is less obvious from the media coverage in the last few days about the USDA MyPlate announcement is that the recommendations are not just in the image. The USDA has created a complete website and brochure that detail the recommendations much more thoroughly.  It also includes a number of interactive tools that help you evaluate the food group, calories and other details about particular foods. There are tools to help you plan meals, specific recommendations for toddlers and pregnant/nursing moms, advice for weight loss and other tips. A few of the other tips from the USDA brochure that I found especially important:

  • Make half your plate fruits and vegetables
  • Eat red, orange, and dark-green vegetables
  • Eat fruit, vegetables or unsalted nuts as snacks – they are nature’s original fast foods.
  • Switch to skim or 1% milk.
  • Make at least half your grains whole.
  • Vary your protein food choices.
  • Twice a week, make seafood the protein on your plate.
  • Use a smaller plate, bowl, and glass.
  • Stop eating when you are satisfied, not full.
  • Keep physically active.

These are just a few of the recommendations that accompany the new MyPlate image. There are lots more details available online. One of the recommendations that I was given when my son was a baby, just learning to eat finger foods, was to provide him with a rainbow of foods. Again, I think that the image works! If you feed your children (and yourself) a variety of different colored foods (and I am talking natural colors – think cherries, oranges, yellow peppers, spinach, blueberries, eggplant – not artificial colors…not fruit loops) throughout the day and week, you will provide a natural array of different vitamins and minerals without having to worry about reading labels.

Thoughts?

What are your tips for healthy eating? Do you like this new image? Do you think that it will make any impact on the obesity crisis?

Related Posts:

Does Nutrition Info on Fast-Food Menus Really Make a “Choice” Difference?

Decreasing Obesity Risks in Children: Another Benefit of Breastfeeding

Can Religion Make You Fat?