Posts Tagged ‘Social Media’

Week in Review (May 8 – 13, 2011) The Eye Opener Health, Law and Medicine Blog

Saturday, May 14th, 2011

From Brian Nash (Editor)

It was another busy week of blogging at Nash & Associates.

The topics of the week were wide-ranging: special needs kids and man’s best friend; Ovarian Cancer – tips for getting the best care; school’s responsibility for informing parents when a child is in danger from themselves or others; stroke – particularly in the African-American community; and the role of social media in general and in our firm for getting the word out about wonderful charitable and civic organizations.

This past week also saw the posting our a new White Paper by Marian Hogan on a very real problem in many of our nation’s hospitals – patient controlled analgesia (PCA). Marian’s piece explores the risks and benefits of this great form of pain relief for hospital patients. Unfortunately, many of the practices in hospitals raise serious concerns about the level of monitoring of PCA in terms of patient safety.

See what strikes your fancy and then click the blog’s title, photo orread more” to view the entire article. Enjoy – and – as always – thanks for stopping by!

PCA Patient Controlled Analgesia: Is it Safe in Today’s Hospitals?

Author: Marian Hogan

Patients who undergo a surgical procedure in a hospital are often placed on intravenous pain medications after the procedure. These medications, such as morphine or other opioid narcotics, are frequently delivered by a pump mechanism that can be regulated by the patient. This is termed a PCA or patient controlled analgesia pump.

Studies have found that there are roughly one half million or more in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrests (IHCA) in the U.S. every year and that approximately 80% of those patients who suffer an in-house cardiopulmonary arrest do not survive, or sustain permanent and severe brain injury if they do live. Read more>>

 

Dogs a huge help for special needs kids

By:  Mike Sanders

Dogs and kids just seem to go together. Whether it’s running around the yard and roughhousing or just sitting quietly watching TV together on the sofa, dogs seem to gravitate toward kids. For some special needs kids, however, dogs are more than just a friend and play buddy; they are actually a daily caregiver.

The idea of service dogs for disabled children is a little-known yet burgeoning niche in the world of special needs. Everyone knows about service dogs for the blind. I have to admit that until recently, I had never even considered service dogs for other disabilities, let alone children. Then a friend of mine whose son is autistic mentioned that she was thinking about getting an autism service dog for her son. I was puzzled. Her son suffers from sensory processing disorder so I didn’t understand what a dog would be able to do for… read more>>


 

Ovarian Cancer

 

Ovarian Cancer – five tips to make sure you get the medical care you need

By Jon Stefanuca

Did you know that more than 21,000 women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer in the U.S. each year? An astonishing 15,000 women die from ovarian cancer each year. Despite numerous advances in healthcare, the mortality rate for ovarian cancer has not improved in the last 30 years. Simply put, ovarian cancer is the deadliest of all gynecologic cancers. If the cancer is diagnosed in its early stages (i.e. before it spreads to other organs), the five-year survival rate is . . . read more >>

 

School’s Duty to Parents: Is Your Child at Risk?

By: Sarah Keogh

Recently, I have been thinking quite a bit about schools. My son is going to start kindergarten in the fall and my daughter just started preschool last week. While both of my kids are still little, over the years children end up spending many of their waking hours each week at school. The school becomes as much a part of their lives as home for most kids. As parents, we put trust in the school that they will be keeping our children safe and healthy while we are not around to supervise. But do the schools recognize that trust and live up to it?

I was recently made aware of a situation involving a teenager who was having some health concerns. Her parents had first noticed that their daughter… read more >>

 

Brother, will you help me? If you don’t this stroke might kill me

By: Jason Penn

Mother’s Day is in the rearview mirror.  This past Mother’s Day someone told me a story about how their grandmother fell ill.  It was the holiday season, and as she climbed the ladder to decorate the tree, things took a tragic turn. She stumbled, lost her balance and fell.  She seemed “off.” A few short hours later, at the hospital, it was revealed that she had suffered a stroke. Read more >>

 

Social Media and Spreading the Word about Those Who Do So Much Good for Those in Need

By: Brian Nash

Recently my wife and I attended an event held by a newly formed Baltimore organization known as Rebels with a Cause. Frankly, I have to admit, I hadn’t heard of this organization before. According to the event flyer published by the person we are sponsoring, this is a local group of bicycle riders who are joining the Ride for a Feast 140 mile bike ride from Ocean City to Baltimore, MD. (Whew! Glad I’m only a sponsor).

Saturday night came and we traveled to Gertrude’s, a restaurant at the Baltimore Museum of Art which provided the venue for a pre-event gathering of this group of dedicated, good-cause-driven riders. Read more >>

 


Sneak Peak of the Week Ahead

Some topics we’ll be covering next week….and then some…

  • the “debate” rages on about breast milk.” Jason Penn takes an interesting look at this issue in light of some recent, fascinating work done at Johns Hopkins.
  • a report of a new HIV study, but what are the possible implications for medical implications under controlled studies
  • acquired brain injury – what is it all about – what is its impact?
  • … and more….

Have a great weekend, Everyone!






Social Media and Spreading the Word about Those Who Do So Much Good for Those in Need

Friday, May 13th, 2011

Recently my wife and I attended an event held by a newly formed Baltimore organization known as Rebels with a Cause. Frankly, I have to admit, I hadn’t heard of this organization before. According to the event flyer published by the person we are sponsoring, this is a local group of bicycle riders who are joining the Ride for a Feast 140 mile bike ride from Ocean City to Baltimore, MD. (Whew! Glad I’m only a sponsor).

Saturday night came and we traveled to Gertrude’s, a restaurant at the Baltimore Museum of Art which provided the venue for a pre-event gathering of this group of dedicated, good-cause-driven riders. A ticket was reasonably priced, but the better news was that all money collected from those attending was being given to Moveable Feast.

Now I had even more “research” to do – what is Moveable Feast (yes, that’s the correct spelling), I wondered. Turns out, it’s a great organization with the following mission:

People with AIDS and other life-challenging conditions often become caught in a vicious cycle of poor appetite and physical weakness that prevents them from providing adequate meals for themselves.

That’s why we’re here – to help. To provide nutritious, free meals and other services to people who are sick and need our support.

The charity’s mission is for those with HIV/AIDS and breast cancer. What a fabulous idea and a worthy cause!

I’m not only writing this piece to let others know about these two organizations, I wanted to share some thoughts about charities, community service programs and social media/the internet.

Yes, there are a vast number of great charities in our country alone. According to one published article, in 2010, there were 1,014,816, of which 507,603 had filed with the IRS. By anyone’s count, that’s a lot of charities. Keep in mind, this is only the number of charities in our country. This doesn’t take into account how many community or social service organizations – that are not charities within the definition of this term – exist throughout our land. I did a quick Google search using the terms “Baltimore community service organizations” and found one site containing 436 directory listings. Granted a number of  these are also “charities,” but not all. I don’t even have a clue how to tabulate the number of such community service organizations there are in this country. Finally, I wondered, what about all of the church-sponsored organizations or hospital-based organizations that offer comfort, assistance and guidance to those in various states of need. You get the idea – the number nationwide must be incredible.

What does this have to do with lawyers on Facebook, Twitter and the Internet?

Just a little over a year ago, our firm ventured into the murky waters of blogging and social media. We fumbled and bumbled around trying to figure out how this was supposed to bring clients to our door so that we represent those with valid cases. As time passed and I started to observe more than tweet and post, I began to realize that social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter are about people connecting with people and those like LinkedIn are wonderful B2B sites.

Having recognized the power of Facebook and Twitter to spread the word on what we know and write about (law, health, medicine, safety, etc.), we stopped posting rehashes of legal rulings, medical malpractice verdicts, and the like and started to publish content loaded with information about “trying to get the word out so you never need a guy like me.” I self-described my social media profile persona as a “Newbie but lover of Blogging on tips n’ tricks (and other stuff) to wisely use healthcare.” Frankly, the readership response has been so rewarding it’s hard to describe. The fact that we are now exceeding 10,000 visitors a month to our site with almost 18,000 pages viewed is beyond our wildest dreams.

Alright – it seems like we may be getting a better idea of the role of social media and how we might be able to “give back” to our community on both a local and national level. As I’ve learned, however, you can’t just “live on the internet.” You need person-to-person contact and involvement.

A new project is being announced

We’re just at the initial phase of our new project; however, we got some really involved, dedicated folks here at the firm. Our current plans include identifying some events we can promote and be personally involved with – yes, even if it means we’ve got to get away from the law books and our computers and get “out there” in the non-digital world to lend support and a helping hand when we can.

Soon we’ll be announcing more details of our community (Baltimore and Washington, D.C.) plans for action.

This fall, there’s an event known as the Race for the Cure. We’ll be throwing our hat in the ring and trying to get our own backers so that we can collect money for this worthy cause. We’re working on a project to help the kids in Baltimore in a civic organization that has been around for years. Frankly, there’s a whole list of projects we now have underway. More announcements to come in the weeks and months ahead.

As lawyers we get to help individuals and their families when they have been injured by the fault of others. That’s been one way to give back to our communities. Now we are going to add to those efforts on a broader community scale. We’re excited about all of the projects and look forward to sharing more with you in future posts.

Jann Rosen-Queralt - Our Rebel With a Cause

One final note

A big congratulations is in order for all those many volunteers out there in our communities.

On a personal note, congratulations and good luck to our own Rebel with a Cause, Jann Rosen-Queralt, whom we’re sponsoring in the upcoming Ride for a Feast.

Jann has collected thousands of dollars in sponsorship contributions. She and her group of “Rebels” are wonderfully giving of their time and energy in the promotion of this incredible cause.

We wish her and all the participants in the Ride Good Luck and safe travels.

 





 

Image from: ourladyofpeaceschool.net

Gratitude: We just topped 8,000 monthly readers – Thanks so much!

Saturday, April 16th, 2011

When we started our blog about 15 months ago, we were hoping that someone – other than our relatives and friends – would come and read our posts. I’m sitting at my computer working on a blog for this coming week and decided I would check our Google Analytics to see how we were doing in trying to get our message out there. Well here’s today’s stats -

Nash & Associates stats via Google Analytics - April 15, 2011

The only words that came to mind when I saw that we had just topped 8,000 visits and almost 11, 500 pages viewed by those visitors over the last 30 days were – and are – THANK YOU!

Yes, I fully realize that these are statistics that apply to our website, but a very large number of these visits are due to folks coming to read our blogs and then checking us out or looking at some other other “stuff” on our website. No – we’re not yet ranked among the big boys or women bloggers, but the numbers tell us that we’re not doing too bad a job either. We’ll just liken ourselves to Avis and keep trying harder.

Almost a year ago, I figured out that if we were ever going to increase our website “hits,” we needed to make our blog, which was sitting on WordPress.com, a subdomain of our website. So, with the help of our “website guy,” we moved the blog over to WordPress.org and voila – the visits started growing immediately.

We – as a law firm – wondered how we could not only market our firm but also how we might be able to actually contribute to our community. As I have said in the past, who really wants to connect with lawyers or a law firm on social media channels? As my wife so aptly likened such a venture – “Who wants to connect with a mortician – unless you need one?” Smart person, my wife.

We ventured into the world of social media via Facebook and Twitter. We initially did the standard lawyer stuff of trying to tell our vast following of about 25 people (yes – our relatives and a few invited but brow-beaten friends) just how wonderful we were as a law firm. Then – after reading a ton of posts by social media gurus and blogging experts – we started to figure out the answer. Notice – I did say “started” – we have a long way to go admittedly.

Blogging by lawyers and socializing via channels such as Facebook and Twitter as a group of lawyers has to be about our readers, friends, fans and followers. We’re still working on it – but at least it seems a good number of people – like YOU (since you must be reading this) are looking for information that can help YOU.

We now have over 500 Fans on our Facebook business page, just under 2,500 followers on our firm’s Twitter page and now – as I learned today – over 8,000 monthly visitors to our website – primarily reading our blog! We just want to say THANK YOU to all of you. You have made the hard times of doing blogging and engaging in social media in the midst of a very busy law practice a rewarding, enriching and wonderful experience. Your loyalty and – yes – friendship – have been a fabulous motivating force to keep all of us going.

We are constantly searching to find new and exciting information in the world of law and medicine. As I wrote in our Twitter profile – I – and my team at Nash & Associates are just -

Lawyer[s] trying to get the word out so you never need [people] like us. Newbie[s] but lover[s] of Blogging on tips n’ tricks (and other stuff) to wisely use healthcare.

That’s why we blog, tweet and post on Facebook. Sure – if you need us (and hopefully you don’t) – we’re here for our local friends, fans and readers in the Baltimore-Washington area. But even more important – we will try to reward your loyalty and friendship with our best efforts to provide you with news, insights, tips and tricks and whatever other good stuff we can muster over the coming weeks, months and years to come.

If at any time you want to drop us a message on what YOU would like for us to write about, we would most certainly appreciate any suggestions you may have. Just drop us a line via Facebook, a direct message on Twitter or through our website’s contact form. Your thoughts and suggestions on how we can accomplish our mission and better connect with you will always be most welcomed and appreciated.

So – again – THANKS to all of you who make and take the time to read what we have to write. Don’t forget to hit the comment button and share YOUR thoughts with us and our other readers as well.

Brian Nash – Editor-in-Chief of Eye Opener – Views and Opinions from the Nash Community

The 22Tweets Interview Experience: An Invaluable Lesson Learned

Friday, November 19th, 2010

Some weeks ago, I was contacted by Lance Godard of The Godard Group, who asked if I would be interested in being interviewed live on 22Tweets at some future date. The concept of the show is for Lance to provide a forum, using the concept of a Twitter mash-up, for lawyers who tweet to tell their story “one tweet at a time.”

We were able to coordinate a date and the interview took place this past Tuesday. As you might expect, the interviewee is presented with twenty-two questions by Lance. The questions and responses are presented in live streaming format on Twitter.

For those of you who are not familiar with Twitter, your message is limited to 140 characters, which is somewhat of an oxymoron – lawyers limiting their world-shaking thoughts to just 140 characters?!

Getting ready for the big day, I studied some of Lance’s interviews with other lawyers. Sweat broke out on my brow. I wondered – how do you answer questions such as these:

  • Tell us about your law practice
  • Tell us about the clients you represent. Who are they?
  • Why do your clients hire you?
  • What do you tell every new client before you start working for them?

If that wasn’t bad enough, I then was queried about the following:

  • Your firm has a blog, Eye Opener (http://bit.ly/bqnokj). Who is it for? Why should they read it?
  • In addition to the blog, you’re active on Twitter and have a Facebook page. What’s your social media strategy?

Try it some time. Figure out what you do, how you do it, and then the biggest question of all – why you do what you do – all in roughly 140 characters!

After the panic subsided, I started to appreciate what a wonderful opportunity this whole process was – no, not just for exposure or for “getting the word out” about our firm, our philosophy and the like. I had to truly reach into the core of our firm, our clients and our soul to answer Lance Godard’s 22 questions.

Fortunately, a few days before going live on 22Tweets, I happened across a video presentation by Simon Sinek on TED entitled How Great Leaders Inspire Action.

Find about 18 minutes of time and watch this inspirational piece. You won’t be disappointed.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u4ZoJKF_VuA

Sinek has created a construct known as the “golden circle.” He asks, why does your organization exist? Why do you get out of bed in the morning? Why should anyone care about your organization? What do Apple, the Wright brothers and Martin Luther King have in common?

He effectively argues that people respond to the why of what you do. People want to do business with those who are able to “communicate from the inside out” – the why is shared with them, and they respond if the why resonates with them. He then warns – if you don’t know why you do what you do, then why would people want to hire you or be inspired by you.

Other gurus in fields such as marketing, branding and the like talk about “defining your goals” and “identifying your niche.” Sounds like the same why question, doesn’t it?

Thankful to people like Simon Sinek, who made me consider the why of what we do, I began my quest to define our why so that I could respond to my upcoming 22 questions.

Lance Godard and 22Tweets were really the ones who forced me to step back and think about issues I should have be contemplating for some time now. I will be forever grateful to him and 22Tweets for doing so. Whether I was able to communicate “our why,” I leave that to others to judge. I only know I will continue to consider some of those 22 questions and try to figure out as best I can – why we do what we do at Nash & Associates. Hopefully we will get a better understanding of ourselves and our clients as we explore and better answer that question.

I hope you in the legal profession get the opportunity that was afforded to us by Lance Godard of 22Tweets. We will always be thankful to him and his group for that wonderful opportunity to get to know ourselves more so that we can serve our clients better.

A Social Networking Lesson for Parents: Think twice before you hit 'send'!

Wednesday, June 2nd, 2010

It’s amazing how people continue to find new ways to get into trouble with social networking.

Photo by Davin Lesnick

Just a few years ago, a parent might get into trouble with his or her teenager by reading the teenager’s diary. Such domestic misdeeds seem almost quaint by comparison to what some parents are now doing on the Internet.

As reported by the ABA Journal and others, a mother in Arkansas has been convicted of harassing her own teenage son via the popular social networking site Facebook. While the mother and her teenage son had an admittedly difficult relationship before this (the teenager had lived with his grandmother for years), the teen never suspected that his mother would go to such lengths in her ongoing battle with him.

Denise New logged onto her son’s personal Facebook account after the teenager apparently left his account open on his computer. Perhaps many parents can appreciate the temptation of peering into their children’s online activities given such an opportunity. This mother, however, was not motivated by concern over her son’s well-being or even simple curiosity. Instead, Ms. New intended to post phony messages on his site purporting to come from him. For example, after the two got into a physical altercation and the police got involved, the mother posted a message on her son’s Facebook account (again pretending she was her son) essentially bragging that he had intentionally started the fight and called the police on his mother. Cell phone messages played in court corroborated that the mother was posting such phony messages. In other messages left on his site, the mother expressed regret at ever having a child and repeatedly used foul language. Putting all of this together, the court found that this conduct constituted harassment of the teenager. The mother was sentenced to 30 days in jail (suspended) along with probation and parenting classes.

As a reminder to all of us in this new world of social networking, the trial judge offered some sage advice:

“We live in a world now where what used to be said between two people or in a parking lot, now you hit a button and hundreds, maybe millions, of people can hear what you do,” he said. “It makes it maybe even more important for a person to think before they act because the amplification can be tremendous.” (Source: Arkansas Online)

Like it or not, we all now have the ability to broadcast information — even highly personal information — to the world.  Apparently, some of us are still struggling with deciding what information should be broadcast and what should be kept to ourselves.

Social Media and the Attorney-Client Privilege: Waiving Your Privilege – Be Forewarned and Use Common Sense!

Monday, May 17th, 2010

Last week I attended a brown-bag lunch meeting conducted by the Baltimore City Bar Association entitled “Ethical Considerations for Social Networking for Lawyers.” (Yes, you cynics – we do have ethics – most of us do at least.)

As the crowd gathered in the bar library, I was somewhat fascinated by the demographics of the group attending. Many of the attendees were from my generation and beyond. No, I’m not going to make it easy, you can click on the ‘About Brian Nash‘ link on our blog page and figure out my age. Let’s put it this way – I’m not just out of law school.

Initially I was impressed that the older folks even knew what ‘social media’ meant. Well, it turns out many of them have a different definition than we Tweeps, Friends and Followers. Guess they thought it had to do with advertising in the Sears, Roebuck & Co. catalog. (Boy, I hope they’re not reading this! – chances are they are not since it would require a computer.)

Let’s get down to the subject at hand. One of the topics that surfaced during the discussion was the issue of whether or not a client could be found to have waived the attorney-client privilege by communicating with their friends, followers and/or connections on social media networks. Further time was devoted to how ‘those-in-the-know’ have been dealing with this potential nightmarish issue. I want to share some of the group’s thoughts and some of my own on further reflection. My hope is that these ‘tips, tricks and warnings’ will prove to be of some help – not only the public as clients but to my fellow lawyers, who may not have considered these issues before.

The Attorney-Client Privilege:

Let me start by giving the requisite disclaimer: No, you are not my client because we are Friends on Facebook or following each other on Twitter or you are reading this blog. No, this is not legal advice. That’s the short version.

What is this privilege? I could quote Black’s Law Dictionary, but in the spirit of the internet, here’s what version 1.0 and 2.0 of the cyberspace’s bible (read: Wikipedia) has to say:

The attorney-client privilege is one of the oldest recognized privileges for confidential communications. The United States Supreme Court has stated that, by assuring confidentiality, the privilege encourages clients to make “full and frank” disclosures to their attorneys, who are then better able to provide candid advice and effective representation.

So how could a tweet, a posting or a comment potentially waive such a sacred and revered protection?

While what constitutes a waiver can at times vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction and certainly from one fact pattern to another, there are some common principles of law that seem to apply.

  • the disclosure must be voluntary and inconsistent with the confidential nature of the attorney-client relationship.
  • the disclosure of the communication with one’s attorney by a client has been made to “unnecessary third parties.”

While law libraries are filled with cases interpreting and ruling on issues of waiver of the privilege, these two elements (intentional disclosure to an unnecessary third party) are sufficient to frame the issue for our discussion.

Does voluntary mean ‘intentional’ – or put another way: “Geez, I didn’t mean to do that.” The short answer (albeit being overly simplistic) is “no, not necessarily.” One of the central issues is – was the disclosure voluntary. Some courts and legal writers suggest that if the disclosure is “inadvertent” (therefore, not voluntary) that this is not a waiver of the privilege. Well, as with most things in the law, there is a laundry list of factors that can be considered to determine if a defense of inadvertent will withstand a challenge to waiver. Some of these might be as follows:

  • the reasonableness (a favorite legal word that can mean anything to anyone) of the precautions taken to prevent inadvertent disclosure
  • the number of inadvertent disclosures
  • the extent of disclosure
  • the delay and measures taken to rectify the disclosure

Well what if you didn’t intend it – or so you say? First of all, I’m not quite sure I want to be standing in front of a judge arguing that when you broadcast a communication you had with your lawyer on Facebook, Twitter or whatever other networking site you live on, you really didn’t intend to type what you typed and then hit ‘enter.’

Can there also be an implied waiver? – another meaningful legal term that keeps all of us lawyers in business. Without getting into a dissertation (more the subject of a law review article) on what constitutes an implied waiver, suffice it to say that this can occur when the client places the communication with their lawyer which goes to the heart of the controversy.

Intent (just like reasonable) generally speaking is one of those fuzzy terms that breeds litigation. For purposes of this article, let’s just focus on whether you intended to put this disclosure out there for your friends and followers. Was the topic you were communicating to your friends/followers (i.e. more than likely defined as “unnecessary third parties”) a confidential communication you had with your lawyer or maybe with your lawyer’s staff?

If it meets these two tests, you will have a difficult if not impossible hurdle to overcome in defending a claim by the opposing lawyer that you waived the attorney-client privilege.

You have now been warned – don’t do it! I know the devil made  your fingers fly over the keyboard when you told your 482 friends about what your lawyer just told you –  about how your case is progressing, or key information your lawyer just discovered, or even your lawyer’s brilliant strategy for getting you a top dollar settlement in your case. The “devil defense” is probably not going to work.

The same goes for lawyers. First of all, the privilege is not the lawyer’s; it belongs in modern jurisprudence to the client. I fully realize that you are just dying to share with your network of legal eagles your most recent brilliant strategy that even Clarence Darrow would never have thought of; however, if you reveal the strategy of a client’s case on such a public forum and it is discovered, you can probably expect a letter from your local attorney grievance commission.

While there are a host of related issues that I will be writing about in the future (e.g. tips and tricks for lawyers during the intake process to identify social media platforms your clients are frequenting, notifications in your fee agreements, and the like), I leave you with one final piece of advice (free at that!!): DON’T DO IT! Keep your communications with your lawyer (clients) off the public social media platforms.

I’m sure you are confident that your user name is so ingenious – LegalBoy528AZ  or imgonnaberichsoon – that you will never get caught. You type away figuring that you’re smarter than any dumb opposing lawyer. Trust me – you don’t want to make that assumption. In fact, in a future blog, I’ll discuss court rulings on this topic of discovery of social media data that may surprise you  - and not in a good way.

To borrow a catchphrase from the TV show Hill Street Blues – “Let’s be safe out there!” I might also add – “Let’s be smart our there!”