Posts Tagged ‘stroke’

FES Equipment Coming to Baltimore’s Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital

Thursday, September 8th, 2011

Author - Sarah Keogh

Back in February, Jon Stefanuca wrote about a study in the Journal of Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair about Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) and the benefits it can provide to those individuals who have suffered spinal cord injuries. He explained how FES is able to provide electrical impulses to stimulate paralyzed muscles. The study’s authors found improvements based on using FES that led them to recommend using stimulation therapy in conjunction with occupational therapy for patients with incomplete spinal cord injuries. This technology is now also being used to help people with a wide range of injuries and illnesses including, stroke, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, and cerebral palsy, in addition to spinal cord injuries. According to the Christopher and Dana Reeves Foundation website, FES works by applying “small electrical pulses to paralyzed muscles to restore or improve their function”. The benefits can be extensive:

FES is commonly used for exercise, but also to assist with breathing, grasping, transferring, standing and walking. FES can help some to improve bladder and bowel function. There’s evidence that FES helps reduce the frequency of pressure sores. From: Christopher and Dana Reeves Foundation website

Improved Technology To Be Locally Available

Since FES was originally developed, the technology improved from being something that was typically integrated into large expensive equipment, such as exercise bikes and wheelchair based equipment, into smaller more portable devices. The good news for individuals with neuro-motor injuries in Baltimore City and the surrounding areas is that this type of FES treatment is about to become more available locally. At the end of August, Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital announced that they have received a “Quality of Life” grant from the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation. The article explains:

The money will help Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital purchase Bioness® equipment for its Adaptive Equipment Rehabilitation Clinic (the clinic). The clinic works with patients with neuro-motor disorders to maximize their movement as much as possible given their physical limitations.

From Bioness.com

The Bioness website explains that they produce a variety of “medical devices designed to benefit people with Stroke, Multiple Sclerosis, Traumatic Brain Injury, Cerebral Palsy, and Spinal Cord Injury. These products use electrical stimulation to help people regain mobility and independence, to improve quality of life and productivity.” While I do not know what particular equipment will be available at the Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital, Bioness makes equipment to assist patients with hand paralysis, foot drop and thigh weakness among other conditions.

MWPH Uses Interdisciplinary Approach Combining FES and Therapy

The article about the grant explains some of the many wonderful things available for patients at the Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital (MWPH):

  • …[an] interdisciplinary approach to the assessment and management of adolescents and children with neuromuscular impairments, paralysis and/or movement disorders
  • … [a] team of 21 experienced specialists in physiatry, occupational therapy, and physical therapy.

The new equipment at MWPH will be used along with the other occupational and physical therapy options available to patients. A study described in US Neurology looked at stroke victims and found the combination of FES and traditional therapies that include repeated motion provide the best results:

Stroke patients with limited voluntary movement could now benefit from technologies such as functional electrical stimulation (fes) combined with necessary repetition of functional tasks (use-dependent plasticity) to enhance the neural repair process and improve outcomes, thus enabling them to begin to overcome their previous limitations and to improve their physical capabilities.

From Bioness.com

The goal at MWPH for children and adolescents is based on a similar idea:

Patients whose muscles can be retrained will require several months of therapy to gain normal range of motion and strength. For those patients with more severe conditions where muscles cannot be retrained, the Bioness® equipment will be used to augment their range of motion. Using these two therapy modalities, patients will acquire greater functionality, range of motion, muscle strength, and the ability to move independently.

This multi-disciplinary approach should allow these children and teens to have the best chances of improved motor use and the most independence in their future lives.

Related Articles:

Coming Soon? Restored Breathing for Spinal Cord Injury Patients

Spinal Cord Injury Updates: More Reasons for Optimism?

New Treatment Holds Promise for Patients With Spinal Cord Injuries

New Microchip Promises to Make Life Much Easier for Paraplegic Patients

New Study Reveals Significant Increase in Pregnancy-Related Strokes

Monday, August 8th, 2011

A new study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association this month reveals that pregnant women have a significantly high risk of developing a stroke. According to the lead author of the study,  Dr. Elena V. Kuklina (senior service fellow and epidemiologist at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)), “the overall rate of women having strokes while they are expecting a baby and in the three months after birth went up 54% in the 12 years leading up to 2006-07.”

This is a significant finding! To put it in context, consider the following facts about stroke:

  • Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. Over 143,579 people die each year from stroke in the United States.
  • Stroke is the leading cause of serious, long-term disability in the United States.
  • Each year, about 795,000 people suffer a stroke. About 600,000 of these are first attacks, and 185,000 are recurrent attacks.
  • Nearly three-quarters of all strokes occur in people over the age of 65. The risk of having a stroke more than doubles each decade after the age of 55.
  • Strokes can – and do – occur at ANY age. Nearly one quarter of strokes occur in people under the age of 65.
  • Stroke death rates are higher for African Americans than for whites, even at younger ages.
  • Among adults age 20 and older, the prevalence of stroke in 2005 was 6,500,000 (about 2,600,000 males and 3,900,000 females).
  • On average, every 40 seconds someone in the United States has a stroke.
  • Each year, about 55,000 more women than men have a stroke.

“A stroke is an interruption of the blood supply to any part of the brain. A stroke is sometimes called a ‘brain attack.’” The following are well-recognized stroke risk factors: high blood pressures (hypertension), atrial fibrillation, diabetes, heart disease, high cholesterol, increasing age, and a family history of strokes.  Being pregnant is a risk factor in and of itself.

As part of the study, Dr. Kuklina and colleagues used information from 5 to 8 million discharge records from about 1000 hospitals. According to Dr. Kuklina, the increase in the stroke rate during pregnancy and in the 3 months after birth was mainly attributable to high blood pressure and obesity. The study enumerates these specific findings:

  • Pregnancy-related stroke hospitalizations went up by 54%, from 4,085 to 6,293 over the 12 years leading up to 2006- 07.
  • Strokes in pregnancy went up by 47% (from 0.15 to 0.22 per 1,000 deliveries).
  • Strokes recently after giving birth went up by 83% (from 0.12 to 0.22 per 1,000 deliveries).
  • Strokes during delivery did not change (they stayed at 0.27 per 1,000 deliveries).
  • In 2006-07, about 32% and 53% of women who were hospitalized after having strokes in pregnancy and shortly after giving birth respectively had either high blood pressure or heart disease.
  • Increased prevalence of these two conditions over the 12 years up to 2006-07 accounted for almost all the increase in stroke hospitalization after giving birth that occurred in the same period.

It appears that an increasingly larger number of women enter pregnancy with one or more stroke risk factors. This is particularly true with respect to hypertension and obesity. According to Dr. Kuklina, “[s]ince pregnancy by itself is a risk factor, if you have one of these other stroke risk factors, it doubles the risk.” For this reason, it is particularly important to enter pregnancy in relatively good cardiovascular health and to reduce other risk factors, if possible. If you are pregnant or plan on becoming pregnant, talk to your OB/GYN about your stroke risk factors. In collaboration with your physician, implement a plan to manage and reduce your stroke risks before, during, and after pregnancy.

Read these related blogs:

Stroke Warnings: Most People Who Experience Minor Strokes Do Not Recognize Its Symptoms

Strokes – Family History a Significant Risk Factor

Spinal Stroke: An atypical cause of back pain

Brother, will you help me? If you don’t this stroke might kill me.

Landmark NIH Clinical Trial Comparing Two Stroke Prevention Procedures Shows Surgery and Stenting Equally Safe and Effective

Parents – be aware and read this article: Children Don’t Have Strokes? Just Ask Jared About His, at Age 7 – NYTimes.com

To view our collection of educational videos about stroke, visit us at:

http://www.youtube.com/user/nashlawatty#g/c/BDCB5099E7C9F6C4

Acquired Brain Injuries: Causes and Impact

Tuesday, May 17th, 2011

On the heels of Jason Penn’s blog regarding calling “911″ for signs of a possible stroke, I decided to introduce a variety of acquired brain injuries for further discussion in future blogs since damage to the brain results in some of the most catastrophic injuries possibly sustained by the human body with significant “collateral damage” for all of the friends and family involved in the individual’s life.

What is an “acquired brain injury”?

Wikipedia defines acquired brain injury as damage to the brain occurring after birth but not including neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s, that occur later in life.  These injuries can further be divided into traumatic and non-traumatic acquired brain injuries.

Traumatic brain injuries are a result of some kind of trauma to the cranium/brain, but the actual causes can vary significantly. Trauma, in general, is the leading cause of death in the young-adult age group. An obvious example of a significant head trauma is the gunshot wound to the head sustained by Arizona Representative Gabrielle Giffords earlier this year. Other examples are assaults with blows to the head, falls with blows to the head, car or bicycle accidents with head injuries, sports-related head injuries/concussion, childhood playground head injuries, and even damage sustained during brain surgery. The degree of damage and permanent sequellae obviously varies as well, ranging from fully recoverable within a few days to catastrophic permanent deficits and even death. Interestingly, the amount of external damage (or lack thereof) does not necessarily reflect the damage inside the cranial vault.

Non-traumatic acquired brain injuries, on the other hand, have a wide range of etiologies not related to head trauma that have just as wide of a range of catastrophic effects and recovery times. One of these causes is a stroke, as described by Jason Penn; however, strokes can be either ischemic (blockage of blood flow to the brain by, for example, a blood clot) or hemorrhagic (when a blood vessel in the brain ruptures), and each is treated very differently!  Other possible causes are infections, brain tumors, failure of other body organs (liver, kidney), loss of oxygen delivery to the brain (heart attack, blood clot in lungs), other chemical or drug ingestions with toxic effects, aneurysm rupture, and build-up of carbon dioxide in the blood stream from other lung pathology, including smoking!

A Virtual Tour of the Brain

Described as the most complex organ in the human body, the brain has been the subject of numerous educational videos, which attempt to give the layman a better understanding of the parts and functions of the human brain. YouTube has numerous “brain anatomy” videos for you to peruse. Here’s one from the University of Bristol that does a good job of providing the basics of this incredible organ.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9UukcdU258A

Effects of Brain Damage

The brain is the body’s 3-pound computer that controls every conscious and unconscious function of the body. Different areas of the brain control different cognitive, behavioral and emotional functions as well as the everyday metabolic functions of the body. Damage to specific areas of the brain result in specific functional losses, which is why someone with a “stroke” might experience numbness and weakness of one side of the body or no weakness but loss of balance or loss of vision. Larger injuries result in more brain tissue damage and more functional deficits. The object of “the game” is to rapidly diagnose the problem and rapidly treat the problem in order to minimize the amount of brain damage, and thus, minimize the functional deficits. Many acquired brain injuries progressively worsen due to different “normal” pathophysiologic mechanisms. It is imperative to intervene sooner whenever possible.

A Personal Story

My uncle had a stroke 1 month ago while working in the yard.  ”911″ was called immediately, and he was transported to the closest hospital.  He apparently had an undiagnosed abnormal heart rhythm (atrial fibrillation) that caused a large blood clot to form in the heart. This clot ultimately got pumped out into the carotid artery and lodged itself at the beginning of the middle cerebral artery on right side of his brain.  He was initially unconscious, but he later “came to”, only to deteriorate into unconsciousness again as the brain swelled from the blocked artery and infarcted brain tissue. He was transferred to another hospital that was capable of performing brain surgery, and he had back-to-back brain surgeries on 4/10 and 4/11 to try to minimize the damage. They actually had to remove a large part of his skull to allow for the brain swelling to occur without the brain’s tissue being compressed against the skull so as to prevent herniation of the brain.

He was in a coma for several days, but he is slowly making some recovery. In the meantime, he needed a tracheostomy and feeding tube in his stomach, both of which he still has. His entire left side remains completely paralyzed. It is difficult for him to stay awake, although he does seem to know who is around at any given time. My aunt, God bless her, has spent the last month at the hospital, 8 hours or more every day, and she is just exhausted. It is unclear when he will be going home or even if he will be going home. We are hoping and praying for the best recovery possible, but the future remains uncertain.

Collateral Damage

In addition to the person affected by acquired brain injury being functionally limited, whether temporarily or permanently, there is often collateral damage to himself/herself as well as to friends and family members. Emotional issues often arise, whether through mood disorders like depression and anxiety, or with actual personality changes. Those affected can become more belligerent or difficult, angry, withdrawn, and a host of other characteristics, making it very difficult on the person caring for the affected individual. The physical demands alone can overwhelm the care-provider (like bathing, toileting, feeding, transporting to appointments, etc.) and lead to care-provider stress and mood disorders.  Financially, these injuries are often devastating. Marriages end; relationships among family members suffer; sometimes, physical abuse and neglect can even occur when frustrations become overwhelming.

There are support groups available many of which can be accessed through local hospitals, associations or your health department.

Locally, you may want to visit the Brain Injury Association of Maryland and the Brain Injury Association of Washington, D.C.

Stay posted for more details on some of these causes of acquired brain injury specifically. In the meantime, do you have a story to tell?

 

Image from neuroskills.com

Week in Review (May 8 – 13, 2011) The Eye Opener Health, Law and Medicine Blog

Saturday, May 14th, 2011

From Brian Nash (Editor)

It was another busy week of blogging at Nash & Associates.

The topics of the week were wide-ranging: special needs kids and man’s best friend; Ovarian Cancer – tips for getting the best care; school’s responsibility for informing parents when a child is in danger from themselves or others; stroke – particularly in the African-American community; and the role of social media in general and in our firm for getting the word out about wonderful charitable and civic organizations.

This past week also saw the posting our a new White Paper by Marian Hogan on a very real problem in many of our nation’s hospitals – patient controlled analgesia (PCA). Marian’s piece explores the risks and benefits of this great form of pain relief for hospital patients. Unfortunately, many of the practices in hospitals raise serious concerns about the level of monitoring of PCA in terms of patient safety.

See what strikes your fancy and then click the blog’s title, photo orread more” to view the entire article. Enjoy – and – as always – thanks for stopping by!

PCA Patient Controlled Analgesia: Is it Safe in Today’s Hospitals?

Author: Marian Hogan

Patients who undergo a surgical procedure in a hospital are often placed on intravenous pain medications after the procedure. These medications, such as morphine or other opioid narcotics, are frequently delivered by a pump mechanism that can be regulated by the patient. This is termed a PCA or patient controlled analgesia pump.

Studies have found that there are roughly one half million or more in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrests (IHCA) in the U.S. every year and that approximately 80% of those patients who suffer an in-house cardiopulmonary arrest do not survive, or sustain permanent and severe brain injury if they do live. Read more>>

 

Dogs a huge help for special needs kids

By:  Mike Sanders

Dogs and kids just seem to go together. Whether it’s running around the yard and roughhousing or just sitting quietly watching TV together on the sofa, dogs seem to gravitate toward kids. For some special needs kids, however, dogs are more than just a friend and play buddy; they are actually a daily caregiver.

The idea of service dogs for disabled children is a little-known yet burgeoning niche in the world of special needs. Everyone knows about service dogs for the blind. I have to admit that until recently, I had never even considered service dogs for other disabilities, let alone children. Then a friend of mine whose son is autistic mentioned that she was thinking about getting an autism service dog for her son. I was puzzled. Her son suffers from sensory processing disorder so I didn’t understand what a dog would be able to do for… read more>>


 

Ovarian Cancer

 

Ovarian Cancer – five tips to make sure you get the medical care you need

By Jon Stefanuca

Did you know that more than 21,000 women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer in the U.S. each year? An astonishing 15,000 women die from ovarian cancer each year. Despite numerous advances in healthcare, the mortality rate for ovarian cancer has not improved in the last 30 years. Simply put, ovarian cancer is the deadliest of all gynecologic cancers. If the cancer is diagnosed in its early stages (i.e. before it spreads to other organs), the five-year survival rate is . . . read more >>

 

School’s Duty to Parents: Is Your Child at Risk?

By: Sarah Keogh

Recently, I have been thinking quite a bit about schools. My son is going to start kindergarten in the fall and my daughter just started preschool last week. While both of my kids are still little, over the years children end up spending many of their waking hours each week at school. The school becomes as much a part of their lives as home for most kids. As parents, we put trust in the school that they will be keeping our children safe and healthy while we are not around to supervise. But do the schools recognize that trust and live up to it?

I was recently made aware of a situation involving a teenager who was having some health concerns. Her parents had first noticed that their daughter… read more >>

 

Brother, will you help me? If you don’t this stroke might kill me

By: Jason Penn

Mother’s Day is in the rearview mirror.  This past Mother’s Day someone told me a story about how their grandmother fell ill.  It was the holiday season, and as she climbed the ladder to decorate the tree, things took a tragic turn. She stumbled, lost her balance and fell.  She seemed “off.” A few short hours later, at the hospital, it was revealed that she had suffered a stroke. Read more >>

 

Social Media and Spreading the Word about Those Who Do So Much Good for Those in Need

By: Brian Nash

Recently my wife and I attended an event held by a newly formed Baltimore organization known as Rebels with a Cause. Frankly, I have to admit, I hadn’t heard of this organization before. According to the event flyer published by the person we are sponsoring, this is a local group of bicycle riders who are joining the Ride for a Feast 140 mile bike ride from Ocean City to Baltimore, MD. (Whew! Glad I’m only a sponsor).

Saturday night came and we traveled to Gertrude’s, a restaurant at the Baltimore Museum of Art which provided the venue for a pre-event gathering of this group of dedicated, good-cause-driven riders. Read more >>

 


Sneak Peak of the Week Ahead

Some topics we’ll be covering next week….and then some…

  • the “debate” rages on about breast milk.” Jason Penn takes an interesting look at this issue in light of some recent, fascinating work done at Johns Hopkins.
  • a report of a new HIV study, but what are the possible implications for medical implications under controlled studies
  • acquired brain injury – what is it all about – what is its impact?
  • … and more….

Have a great weekend, Everyone!






Spinal Stroke: An atypical cause of back pain

Monday, April 11th, 2011

When one hears the word stroke, what typically comes to mind is a “brain attack” with slurred speech or numbness and weakness of the right or left side of the body. Well, the spinal cord is considered part of the central nervous system and is truly a direct connection to the brain. All of the data received through nerve endings in our bodies passes through the spinal cord to be interpreted in the brain. Likewise, the messages our brain is sending to our bodies, both consciously and unconsciously (e.g. walk, run, write, speak; and digest food, breath, increase heart rate, etc.), travel through the spinal cord to our peripheral nerves.

The spinal cord is a vital structure that has its own blood supply, much like other organs, including the heart and brain. Just like the blood vessels supplying the other organs, the spinal arteries, especially the anterior spinal artery, can become occluded (i.e. blocked) resulting in spinal cord ischemia or infarction. The nerve information can no longer travel to and from the brain or the body freely; it is interrupted. This equates to a “stroke” of the spinal cord with resultant numbness, weakness, paralysis, as well as bowel and bladder dysfunction below the level of the infarction/stroke.

What causes a “spinal stroke”?

The most common cause of spinal stroke is the same as that for brain stroke or heart attack……atherosclerosis, an accumulation of cholesterol plaque in the arterial wall that ultimately blocks the artery. No blood flow means no oxygen or nutrients to the cells and tissues of the spinal cord resulting in them “starving to death.” There are other causes, as well; anything that compresses one of the supply arteries can block blood flow to a region of the cord and result in “stroke.”

Tumors, either primary or metastatic, can compresses blood vessels and other structures as they grow in the spinal region. Anterior disc herniations and disc ruptures or bone fragments from traumatic fractures of the vertebrae can compress blood vessels in the immediate vicinity.

Collections of pus from infectious processes can interrupt the blood supply either by compressing a vessel or disintegrating the blood vessel.  Small pieces of blood clots (called emboli) can break-off from larger clots (called thrombi) and circulate through the bloodstream until they get “stuck” in a smaller vessel somewhere else in the body; the spinal artery is just one location. Other systemic diseases can result in vasculitis, or an inflammation of the blood vessel, that leads to clotting and occlusion of that vessel, and the spinal artery is just one of the vessels that can be affected.

Surgery and spinal stroke

Interestingly, inter-abdominal and spinal surgical procedures can also lead to spinal cord ischemia and stroke. Individuals undergoing repair of an aortic aneurysm or iliac-to-femoral artery bypass often require “cross-clamping” of the aorta above the level of the surgery. The “golden hour” referred to in heart attack victims can also be applied to other vascular ischemic conditions, like spinal artery ischemia; if complications arise and the cross-clamp time is too long, it can result in ischemia from which the patient may never recover, remaining paralyzed for life. Similarly, an aortic dissection can disrupt blood flow to the smaller arteries branching from the aorta to feed the spinal cord leading to ischemia.

Spinal surgeries take one of two approaches, anterior (going through the belly) or posterior (going through the back). Because of the proximity of all of the vital structures, including the major blood vessels, small errors or retained fragments can lead to occlusion or disruption of the spinal blood supply.

Who is at risk for spinal stroke?

Those individuals with risk factors for heart disease or brain stroke are also at risk for spinal stroke since they share a common etiology. This includes those individuals with poorly-controlled diabetes, high cholesterol or dyslipidemia, abnormal clotting of the blood, peripheral arterial disease or history of aneurysms.

What are the symptoms of a spinal stroke?

Most patients present with sudden, severe pain, much like a heart attack, in either the chest or the back or both. This pain is typically rapidly followed by numbness, or loss of pain sensation and temperature sensation, in the extremities below the level of the stroke. Because of the anatomy of the blood supply, vibration sensation and position sense are maintained in the affected region since the posterior region of the cord has a different blood supply. As the spinal stroke progresses over an hour or so, the extremities affected become weaker and weaker, often experiencing paralysis, and the bowel and bladder lose their innervation leading to dysfunction and incontinence. This is a fairly rapid progression, much different that other myelopathies.

What is the treatment?

Due to the relative rarity of this condition, not many studies have been done regarding treatments. Unlike “heart attack” or “brain attack,” there are no standards of care except for aspirin therapy and (potentially) anti-platelet therapy after the stroke has occurred. More often than not, there is a delay in diagnosing the condition due to the rarity of the condition and the need to confirm the diagnosis by a diffusion-weighted enhanced MRI of the spine, such that “clot-busting” agents are time-excluded from use. Treatments are then focused on preventing additional vascular events, preventing deep vein thromboses in the paralyzed limbs, preventing bladder infections and fecal impactions, preventing decubitus ulcers and soft tissue infections, and preventing the additional morbidity associated with paralysis. This is not a comforting thought!

We are blessed with today’s medical technological advances that allow for so many life-saving procedures and procedures that preserve body function, such as spinal surgery, vascular stenting procedures and epidural injections. Unfortunately, some of these procedures have increased the incidence of spinal strokes due to the nature of the procedures themselves. The current epidemic of obesity and metabolic syndrome is also indicative of more cases of diabetes and atherosclerotic vascular disease which, according to the law of probability, will increase the incidence of this potentially devastating medical condition.

Clinical Trials Underway

Do you know someone who has had a spinal stroke? What was his or her age? What might have precipitated the “attack”? Some individuals have been in their early 20′s when the attack occurred. Needless to say, this is truly devastating! With all of our advanced technology, we should be doing a better job of preventing, diagnosing and treating this condition. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) does offer clinical trials for this condition; please refer to their website for further information. ( http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/spinal_infarction/spinal_infarction.htm)

Image from homebusinessandfamilylife.com

Study reveals “staggering” statistics on Medicare patients who will die or be readmitted within one year of stroke

Wednesday, December 22nd, 2010

Today I came across an excellent post in theheart.org entitled “Death and readmission rates after stroke “staggering” for Medicare Patients.” As a general comment, if you are not familiar with this online journal, I would strongly recommend you register (it’s free). They post a number of excellent pieces on a consistent basis.

Dr. Gregg Fonarow and colleagues did a study examining the outcomes for 91,134 Medicare patients, who had suffered an ischemic stroke between April 1, 2003 and December 31, 2006. The researchers themselves described their findings as “staggering.” Here is the essential finding:

Almost two-thirds of Medicare beneficiaries discharged from the hospital after suffering an ischemic stroke die or are readmitted within a year.

Does the type of hospital make a difference?

While ostensibly not the major focus of the study, Dr. Fonarow’s research team did examine data to determine if the outcomes were significantly better if the patient was seen for the initial acute ischemic stroke at an academic center versus a non-academic (e.g. community hospital). The finding in this regard was not what I expected.

Rates were only slightly lower for academic hospitals than nonacademic centers. “That was surprising,” said Fonarow. “Whether a hospital was academic or bedside or, more important, a joint commission primary stroke center really did not make a large difference in outcomes.”

The impact on the healthcare system is obvious and alarming

I don’t claim to have any expertise in statistical analysis or application of such data to a system-wide root cause analysis. That being said, does it really take a statistician or mathematician to grasp the import of this “staggering” data? If you or someone you know is on Medicare and has suffered an acute ischemic stroke, there is a 2 out of 3 chance you (or the person you know) will be readmitted or die within one year of suffering that stroke!

The big questions: Why and What can be done?

Dr. Fonarow readily admits that the data he collected does not lend itself to the ultimate answers. What he does note, however, is that while further studies are clearly warranted, since more than one-half of the cases for readmission analyzed involved non-cardiovascular causes, “there’s room for better secondary-prevention efforts.”

“When you looked at causes of readmission, in many cases it was not a recurrent stroke or cardiovascular event but other comorbid conditions, such as pneumonia, falls, and GI bleeds,” he said. “It shows you that when caring for someone after a stroke, managing these comorbid conditions and related risks is going to be critical.”

He added that the period after discharge for an ischemic stroke offers a “window of opportunity” for interventions to reduce the burden of post-ischemic stroke morbidity and mortality.

The information shared by Dr. Fonarow is unequivocally “staggering.” One can only hope that further system-wide studies are performed soon to identify what improvements can and need be made in the delivery of health care to this population to reduce such loss of life and burden on the healthcare system secondary to readmissions.

What’s your reaction to Dr. Fonarow’s study? Are you aware of any data that is known for death and readmission rates in the non-Medicare population? If there is a significant difference in death and readmission rates between Medicare and non-Medicare patients, what is being done in the non-Medicare population that can be adopted for all patient populations?

Image from mountnittany


Stroke Warnings:Most People Who Experience Minor Strokes Do Not Recognize Its Symptoms

Thursday, April 29th, 2010

According to an article published by WebMD, a recent study suggests that most people who experience minor strokes or transient ischemic attacks (TIA’s) do not recognize their symptoms and/or do not seek timely medical attention.A stroke is generally defined as an interruption of blood flow to the brain.

Strokes can be divided into two categories: hemorrhagic strokes and ischemic strokes. TIA is a condition that manifests itself with stroke-like symptoms for less than 24 hours. TIA does not by itself result in lasting neurological damage. However, people who experience TIA episodes often develop strokes. According to the article, one in 20 patients with TIA will develop a major stroke.

After interviewing about 1000 patients, researchers concluded that about 70% of the patients did not recognize TIA or minor stroke symptoms and that less than half of the patients with these conditions sought medical attention within three hours from the onset of symptoms.    

If you are at an increased risk for developing a stroke, ask your doctor for information on TIA and stroke symptoms. Early medical intervention is key in treating stokes. Please take some time to familiarize yourself with some of the TIA/stroke symptoms.


According to the article, people who experience minor strokes may develop one or more of the following:

  • sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arms or legs, especially on one side of the body
  • sudden trouble speaking or understanding
  • confusion
  • sudden vision problems in one or both eyes
  • dizziness, loss of balance, or sudden trouble walking
  • severe headache with no obvious cause

Remember – time is of the essence in getting treatment. Certain therapies (e.g. tPA) simply can not be administered to you if too many hours pass.

Contributing author: Jon Stefanuca

Strokes – Family History a Significant Risk Factor

Tuesday, March 9th, 2010

According to an article published by WebMD, individuals whose parents have had a stroke by age 65 are more likely to have a stroke.

Strokes are generally defined as disturbances of blood flow in the brain as a result of a ruptured blood vessel, a blockage within the lumen of the blood vessel, or some other ischemic process. The ischemic process can cause brain tissue to die, resulting in death or permanent brain injury. In all respects, strokes represent medical emergencies.

Among other things, the following are generally considered to be risk factors for developing a stroke: previous history of strokes, brain trauma, advanced age, increased lipid levels, increased blood pressure, diabetes, atrial fibrillation, and smoking.

The results of the study suggest that a person’s family history of strokes should also be considered in assessing the risk for developing a stroke.

Researchers studied 3,443 people who initially were stroke free and second-generation participants in the Framingham Heart Study. The participants’ parents had reported 106 strokes by age 65, and offspring 128, over the 40-year study. People with a parent who had a stroke by age 65 had twice the risk of having a stroke at any age and four times the risk by 65, after adjusting for conventional risk factors.

Contributing author: Jon Stefanuca