Posts Tagged ‘vaginal delivery’

Simulation Labs: Helping Teach Nurses in Baltimore

Tuesday, September 27th, 2011

From nursing.jhu.edu

Any one who has ever had a hospital stay or knows a loved one or friend who has been in the hospital knows that the nurses play a vital role in caring for patients. Nurses do many of the day-to-day activities of caring for patients in hospitals and clinics. They are also often the first ones at the bedside if a problem arises – so -isn’t it essential that nurses be well trained in all forms of emergency procedures? Even when doctors are present, nurses often play vital roles in assisting the doctors in providing life-saving care to patients.

Law and Medicine Intersect Once Again

I have recently been working on a case in which both doctors and nurses were present during an in-hospital delivery that ended with a significant injury to the child. During the delivery, a problem was encountered that has a low incidence rate during deliveries.  In considering this problem, I wondered just how frequently doctors and nurses are able to practice the skills they would need to successfully and calmly deliver a baby in a situation like this.  Faced with this “emergency” situation, how many of the doctors and nurses in the room had not experienced this problem before? For those who had –  just how much “experience” did they bring to the problem they were facing?

Simulations Rooms and Simulation Patients Provide Training Opportunities

Thankfully, technology is making it more feasible for training healthcare providers to practice handling a myriad of clinical situations during their education process that they might otherwise not experience frequently enough for their skills to develop in real world settings. In Baltimore, the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing (JHUSON) has simulation rooms in which nursing students are able to practice a variety of procedures and techniques using simulation patients in rooms that are designed to replicate the real patient areas of the hospital. There is also a whole family of simulators to help. This “sim fam” is not like the lifeless plastic dummies you might be imagining. They are a variety of different types of “…life-like practice manikins, including Sim Man, Vital Sim Man, Noelle with newborn, and Sim Baby [that] give nursing students the hands-on experience without the anxiety of working with actual human beings.”

Harvey the Cardiac Sim, SimNewB and Sim Man 3G  - All New Additions to the “Sim Fam”

From nursing.jhu.edu

Just this year, in March, JHUSON added Harvey to its collection of simulators.  While Harvey is new to JHUSON, he is not exactly new technology:

For almost 40 years Harvey, developed in cooperation between Laerdal Medical Corporation and Miami University Miller School of Medicine, has been a proven simulation system teaching bedside cardiac assessment skills that transfer to real patients, and remains the longest continuous university-based simulation project in medical education.

Harvey’s job is to be able to simulate “nearly any cardiac disease at the touch of a button: varying blood pressure, pulses, heart sounds, and murmurs. The software installed in the simulator allows users to track history, bedside findings, lab data, medical and surgical treatment.”  He joins a collection of other sim patients that enable healthcare providers to learn and practice critical life-saving measures such as CPR, defibrillation, intubation and yes – even the proper checking of vital signs. JHSON has adult, child and baby versions of these simulators. Some of them can even “talk” to the practicing nurses. (I wonder if they are programmed to be cooperative and informative or hostile and combative – hmmm.)

New Family Members Arrived this Past August

Even newer, in August, JHUSON added SimNewB and Sim Man 3G to the family. The SimNewB is:

…a 7 pound, 21 inch female baby, with realistic newborn traits. Students will be able to simulate a wide variety of patient conditions with her, including life-threatening ones. The department’s current Sim baby is the size of a 6 month old and is not as conducive to delivery room procedures.

She is also interactive, though she is not wireless like the Sim Man 3G. Some of the new Sim Man’s traits include “…breath sounds both anteriorly and posteriorly, … pupil reactions, [and] skin temperature changes.”

What about Obstetrics Cases?

So, what about the case I was mentioning that involved obstetrical care? Well, JHUSON also has a pregnant simulator, which is can be used to practice a whole host of obstetrically related procedures. These include “Leopold maneuvers, normal vaginal and instrumented delivery, breech delivery, C-section, and postpartum hemorrhaging, among other functions.” The JHUSON sim family also has the new Sim newborn – SimNewB.

The “Jury” Is Still “Out”

Can there be any doubt that additional hands-on practice opportunities with simulators is a good idea for situations that may not come up very often in everyday practice? Won’t it help healthcare practitioners gain skills and keep those skills up-to-date? Any opinion I might have on these issues is not based on evidence….yet. Luckily, JHSON is “…among 10 nursing schools nationwide collaborating on a landmark study to find out just how well patient simulators—high-tech manikins that respond to a nurse’s care—help prepare the nurses of tomorrow.”  I – for one – will certainly be interested in the outcome of that study.

What about you? Do you think that it makes sense for nurses in training to make use of simulation rooms and simulated patients? Would it be better for them to spend more time in real world situations doing real patient care under the supervision of experienced practitioners? What about techniques that might not come up very often?

If any of the readers of this post have used these sim patients in your training and can give us firsthand information as to how, if at all, it carried-over to make you more “experienced and skilled” when facing similar clinical situations with real patients, your comments would be most welcomed as well.

New Guidelines for Vaginal Births After Cesarean Section – Abandoning the Principle of “Once a Cesarean Always a Cesarean”

Thursday, July 29th, 2010

For decades, expecting mothers were encouraged to deliver via C-section if they had a history of previous C-sections. The maxim “once a cesarean, always a cesarean” became the default approach for many OB/GYNs around the country. This may no longer be the case.

This year, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists issued a number of less restrictive guidelines for vaginal births after C-sections. According to William A. Grobman, M.D. an associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University and co-author of the new guidelines, women with two previous C-sections and no vaginal deliveries, women expecting twins, and women with vaginal scarring from previous C-sections are now acceptable candidates for vaginal deliveries. The new guidelines are supported by two recent studies that examined the risk of complications in women with a history of two previous C-sections who attempted vaginal delivery.

One [study] found no increased risk of uterine rupture in women with one vs. multiple previous C-sections, while the other study found the risk increased from 0.9% to 1.8% in women with one vs. two previous C-sections.

The new guidelines make the following recommendations:

  • Women with more than one previous C-section may be candidates for a trial of labor. … The chance of achieving a vaginal birth after C-section seems similar for women with one or more than one C-sections.
  • Women who have an unknown type of scar from a previous C-section can also be considered for a trial of labor.
  • Women expecting twins can be offered the trial of labor.
  • A trial of labor is not recommended in others, including women who are at high risk for complications, such as women with a previous uterine rupture or extensive uterine surgery.
  • Previous guidelines recommended that resources for emergency C-sections be ”immediately available.” “That was interpreted to mean all staff, literally immediately available,” Grobman says. In the new guidelines, the ACOG recommends that a trial of labor after C-section ideally be done in facilities well staffed to provide immediate emergency care, but that in a facility without immediate staff available, those doctors and patients discuss the resources and staff availability and carefully consider the decision to try labor.

The new guidelines clearly encourage vaginal deliveries for expecting mothers with previous C-sections. However, Grobman and his colleagues were clear that, although the risk appears minimal, trial of labor after C-sections does carry a number of risks, including uterine rupture, hemorrhage, and infection. For this reason, notwithstanding these  new recommendations, the expecting mother and the physician should carefully discuss and consider the decision to try labor. If you meet the criteria, we urge you to fully understand the potential risks, complications as well as the benefits of vaginal birth after Cesarean Section.