Posts Tagged ‘Week in Review’

Week in Review: (May 22 – 28, 2011) The Eye Opener Health, Law and Medicine Blog

Saturday, May 28th, 2011

From the Editor – Brian Nash

Last week’s posts by our blawgers were packed with information about a variety of topics ranging from the medicine you need to know about concussions, living with cancer, cerebral palsy resources and the potential risks of overdosing your child with medications.

On the legal front, we began a series I’m personally excited about. We call it Legal Boot Camp. It will be a series for those in our practice jurisdictions of Maryland and Washington, D.C. Our teacher’s face is on – lesson plans in place. We hope you learn some things about the laws that can affect your lives in the areas of personal injury – particularly medical malpractice law.  Our first class took place with a piece by Sarah Keogh that examines the law in Maryland on the right to claim loss/diminished earning capacity. If you’re wondering if you can have such a claim even if you weren’t working when you were injured, Sarah has some information for you. Check it out. Turn in your class card and have some fun.

We wrapped up the week with a piece by yours truly on a wonderful community outreach program by our local baseball heroes, the Baltimore Orioles. Aptly named – OriolesREACH, this initiative has a number of wonderful events, charities and missions that are worth knowing about. One in particular, Shannon’s Fund, is a great program to help those in need while dealing with the financial burdens while dealing with cancer. It is run by the University of Maryland Medical Center. Read about our challenge to our brethren before the bar in the Greater Baltimore Area.

Without further ado, here are the blogs we posted this past week …. and a sneak peak of the week ahead.

Concussions: The Message of Brian Roberts’ Injury Should Not Go Unheeded

Posted by Brian Nash

Anyone who follows sports is well aware that finally the old school mentality of “gut it out and get back in there” following blows to the head are coming (not too soon) to an end. Committees have been formed, articles written and the national spotlight of the media have finally focused on this issue. Those recommendations, debates and guidelines are beyond the scope of this post. Nevertheless, those involved in sports…Read more >

Children’s Medications: Coming Changes and Tips to Avoid Overdose

Posted by Sarah Keogh

My children are both young; the youngest is now a little past her second birthday. In the last few years, we have had both infant and children medication in the house, liquid and tablets, and I have been very careful to make sure to double-check myself if I ever have to medicate either child to make sure that I am reading the correct dosing matrix for the correct concentration and for the correct child. More often than not, I have found that children need medication when their parents are tired. As parents know – children frequently…Read more >

 

Living With Cancer: What to Expect After the Diagnosis

Posted by Jon Stefanuca

About a million and a half people will be diagnosed with cancer in the U.S. this year. The devastating truth about cancer is that about one-third of these people will die from cancer at some point. For most, the diagnosis is unexpected and completely overwhelming.The cancer does not just affect how one feels, it undermines all sense of security and stability. It changes lifestyles and redefines relationships. So often the emotional trauma is equally shared among family members and loved ones. Read more >

New Blog Series: Legal Boot Camp

Posted by Brian Nash

I’m really pleased to announce a new series we’re starting today. If you’re a reader of our blog, you know that we post numerous times a week on health, safety, medicine and related law topics. That’s what we do in our firm – we represent people who are injured by the negligence of health care providers and those who suffer catastrophic injuries in non-medical settings as well. So, sharing what we believe is some good information about medical, health and safety issues is our mission. We strongly believe that our social networking should be about giving good information, engaging in dialogue about relevant issues – just plain good, old sharing. Read more >

Legal Boot Camp (First Class): The Story of Pam – Maryland’s Law on Loss of Earning Capacity

Posted by Sarah Keogh

A 41-year-old woman, Pam, who was laid off from her job as a swimming instructor and swim coach in December of 2009, has been struggling to find a new position for the last few years. Even though Pam had been working as a swimming instructor full-time for the past 18 years, she felt that she needed to jump into a new career while waiting to find a new position as a swimming instructor and coach. Starting in October of 2010, her father died leaving her a rundown home that he had recently purchased with the intent of renovating it. Pam felt that she could put her physical fitness and knowledge of home aesthetics to work, not to mention the ideas she picked up watching renovations shows while unemployed, by renovating the home her father left… Read more >

Dealing with Cerebral Palsy: A Resource for Parents and Family

Posted by Jason Penn

Today’s society has become increasingly dependent on aggregators. We use a variety of methods to assemble and sort information so that we can easily consume it.  Mint.com and Quicken help with our finances and Google Reader helps to manage our online content. A quick search of the internet suggests that the parents of children withcerebral palsy do not yet have an objective aggregator of information to turn to.  Let’s consider this our attempt to provide parents in the Baltimore and Washington D.C. areas with a place to turn. Read more >

Charity Begins at Home: OriolesREACH Program Hits a Grand Slam with Us!

Posted by Brian Nash

I recently wrote a post about our local area charities and civic organizations who do so much for so many in our community. With that in mind, as I was happily reading the sports page in the warm glow of the Orioles’ 12th inning victory yesterday (5 in a row – Go O’s), I came across a piece about a new initiative for our military personnel by the Birds. While looking at the details of this worthy program, I noticed (ashamedly for the first time, I admit) a host of community programs being run by the Orioles. The team uses the name OriolesREACH for the community programs they sponsor, promote or fund. Read more >

Sneak Peak of the Week Ahead

Here’s a sampling of what’s coming next week on The Eye Opener: Views and Opinions from the Nash Community:

  • As families prepare for the upcoming holidays and summer vacation, Theresa Neumann has some important medical advice about what else needs to be included in your travel plans.
  • Legal Boot Camp: Prepare for our second class – get those pencils, pens, iPads and whatever else you need out and ready – there could be a pop quiz on next week’s primary on law.
  • What rights do babies-before-birth (fetal rights) have in our legal system? Do parents who lose a child just before birth have any rights of recovery? You’ll find out next week.
  • Home births are on the rise. Is that a good or a bad thing? Sarah Keogh weighs in on that issue in the coming edition of The Eye Opener

And….maybe even more to come…you can never tell….

Have a wonderful and safe Memorial Day Weekend. Best to All of You and Your Families and Friends from All of Us at Nash & Associates

Week in Review (April 16 – 20, 2011) The Eye Opener Health, Law and Medicine Blog

Saturday, May 21st, 2011

From the Editor (Brian Nash)

Another week of great posts (IMHO) by our blawgers. Apparently, I’m not the only one who thinks so since we have now surpassed 21,000 page views in the last 30 days. The number keeps rising. Our sincere gratitude to all our readers!

Our topics were once again quite varied. They spanned the law, health, science and medicine. We even had a piece on a local event – Marathon Kids. This piece is part of our new program to promote charities and civic organizations in our own backyard – Baltimore and Washington.

We try week in and week out to find topics of interest for you, our readers. If you ever have any suggestions for topics of interest to you, please leave a comment or send us an email or fill-out the contact form with your thoughts and suggestions. We’d love to hear from you.

Let’s get to it then. What did we cover this past week that you might be interested in reading? Take a look -

Why early settlement is a win-win for all

By: Michael Sanders

There is an old adage in the law that cases settle on the courthouse steps. There is a reason for that. When the parties are actually walking into court to try their case, they seem to suddenly recognize that there are significant risks to going to trial, and that there is serious money at stake. When you go to trial, only one side can win. The other side goes home a loser. Faced with such a stark outcome, both sides tend to become more reasonable in their assessment of their case and more willing to talk settlement. After all, despite all the years of experience that trial attorneys amass, no one can ever predict what a jury is going to do in any specific case. As one mediator I know likes to tell the litigants, going to court is like going to Vegas:  you roll the dice and you take your chances. Read more….

Milk from Mom: Effective in preventing common infant complication (NEC)

By: Jason Penn

The debate among parents regarding the use of human milk vs. formula wages on, but according to a recent study, you can chalk one up for the human body.  That study, headed by the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, concluded that premature babies fed human donor milk were less likely to develop the intestinal condition necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC).  Both sides has its advocates, willing to do battle at any time. When it comes to NEC, Mom’s milk has the decided advantage. Read more….

H.I.V. treatment advances, but what are the implications of terminating research early?

By: Sarah Keogh

Last week, I read some exciting news about H.I.V. treatment and transmission. A New York Times article reported that a large clinical trial found that “[p]eople infected with the virus that causes AIDS are far less likely to infect their sexual partners if they are put on treatment immediately instead of waiting until their immune systems begin to deteriorate…” The study found that “[p]atients with H.I.V. were 96 percent less likely to pass on the infection if they were taking antiretroviral drugs…” These findings are overwhelmingly positive and the implication for public health is huge. Read more….

A Windy, Rainy but Fabulous Day in Baltimore: Marathon Kids Final Mile Celebration

By: Rachel Leyko

Despite the wind and rain, this past Saturday I volunteered at the Marathon Kids Final Mile Celebration Event at Western Polytechnic High School in Northwest Baltimore.  I learned of the event through the Junior League of Baltimore and to be honest, prior to Saturday, I did not know much about the organization, its purpose or effect on the children it sought to serve.  However, after Saturday’s event, not only was I impressed with the purpose of Marathon Kids, but I saw firsthand the positive effect this program has had on the children who have participated. Read more….

Acquired Brain Injuries: Causes and Impact

By: Theresa Neumann

On the heels of Jason Penn’s blogregarding calling “911″ for signs of a possible stroke, I decided to introduce a variety of acquired brain injuries for further discussion in future blogs since damage to the brain results in some of the most catastrophic injuries possibly sustained by the human body with significant “collateral damage” for all of the friends and family involved in the individual’s life. Read more….


Sneak Peak of the Week Ahead

Some topics we’ll be covering next week…and then some…

  • You or someone you know has been diagnosed with cancer, now you have to deal with the horror. Jon Stefanuca will be writing a piece based on our experiences with a number of clients “living with cancer.”
  • Mike Sanders and I have both recently resolved cases involving families who have lost a child. Mike’s involved the death of a fetus very near term. He’ll share that story and the experience of the case with you.
  • Maybe those of you who have children with special needs are familiar with the local (Maryland and Washington, D.C.) resources to help you and your child. For those who may not be or just want to learn more, Jason Penn will be providing information on this next week.
  • You may have heard the recent news about labeling of certain medications for children. Sarah Keogh will report on this and also delve into some practical problems and issues that parents face every day in terms of medicating their children.
  • We’re going to begin a new series on exactly what is recoverable in our jurisdictions (Washington, D.C and Maryland) under what is known as the Survival Act and the Wrongful Death Act. We’ll be paying particular attention to issues involving what’s known as pecuniary benefits, loss wages and diminished earning capacity. Should be educational. We hope you enjoy it.

Have a great weekend, Everyone!

Week in Review (May 2 – 6, 2011): The Eye Opener Health, Law and Just Interesting Stuff Blog

Saturday, May 7th, 2011

From Brian Nash (Editor)

We appreciate your stopping by to see what this past week’s posts covered in the world of law, medicine, health and safety – and then some.

You’ve been told you need to undergo treatment. The doctor tells you (hopefully) the risks and benefits of what’s being proposed. You’re wondering – “Is this my only choice?” In a non-emergency situation you usually have a choice you may not have considered – a second opinion. Theresa Neumann’s piece this past week addresses this usually available but very under-utilized resource for patient’s facing this situation.

Sarah Keogh writes about a topic that makes a lot of sense – when you stop and think about it. Who are the people on a hospital’s medical team that are with you more than anyone else? Your nurses, of course. Just how does a nurse’s working conditions not only affect him or her – how does it affect your health? Read Sarah’s piece and find out.

Asthma affects the lives of 20 million people in America. It does not discriminate since it affects the young, the old and all in between. This past week, Jon Stefanuca, who has been immersed in a case involving a young man who tragically died as a result of asthma shortly after being discharged from a local hospital, shared his “4 tips” to make sure you get the health care you need when you have an asthma problem. If you or someone close to you has asthma, take the time to consider Jon’s suggestions. As always, if there are some suggestions you could share with others, please do in the comments section.

Recently our firm started using QR Codes on our business cards. I’d heard about them but wasn’t quite sure what they were all about. After a little bit of study and discussion, I was amazed at what they can do – you will be too. So many now use their phones and mobile devices as their primary means for connecting with the world via the internet. Just download a free mobile application, snap a picture using the app and the QR Code will whisk (at a blazingly fast speed) you away to more information than you can imagine. Jason Penn, who was the first to get his QR Code business card, was apparently fascinated by this new technology, so he wrote a post this week about it and shares with you some interesting information about some others who have been using it for some time now.

Our Posts of the Past Week

Medical Second Opinions: An Under-utilized Option for Patients

By: Theresa Neumann

Today’s medical world is vast with various technologies, treatments and options.  So, if a patient is diagnosed with a medical condition, and doctor A recommends treatment A, what keeps the patient from seeking a second opinion? This is an interesting phenomenon.  After performing intake summaries and client interviews for quite a while now, it still amazes me how many people have bad outcomes from surgery simply because they never requested a second opinion. Second opinions are not simply reserved for surgery, though; cancer treatment options, medical therapies for chronic conditions like rheumatoid arthritis or inflammatory bowel disease….read more

 

Working Conditions for Nurses Impact Patient Health

By: Sarah Keogh

I suspect that anyone who has spent even as much as one day or night in a hospital knows just how critical the nursing staff is in the , health, care and comfort of a patient. A compassionate and personable nurse can put a patient at ease and help them feel better in ways that go beyond just medicine.

Recently, I wrote about how different schedules impact nurses’ lives and how they cope with shifting from day to night schedules. This week, I was drawn to write about nurses again after seeing an article on medicalnewstoday.com that spoke about a study done by the University of Maryland School of Nursing.  Read more

Having an Asthma Problem: 4 Tips for you to use to get the medical care you need

By: Jon Stefanuca

Did you know that approximately 20 million Americans suffer from asthma?  Every day, about 40,000 of them miss school or work because of this condition. Each day, approximately 30, 000 experience an asthma attack.  About 5000 patients end up in the emergency room. Asthma is also the most common chronic condition among children. Can there by any doubt it is a very serious and potentially deadly medical condition that needs equally serious understanding and attention? The good news is that with proper education and treatment, most asthmatics have active and productive lives.

Bronchospasm and inflammation: the key features of asthma

This chronic airway disease has two primary features: bronchospasm and inflammation. Bronchospasm refers to the mechanism by which airways become narrower. In asthmatic patients, the muscle within the wall of the airway contracts, thus narrowing the lumen (a cavity or channel within a tubular structure) of the airway and causing respiratory obstruction. Inflammation refers to the process by which the wall of the airway becomes thicker in response to inflammation, which also causes the lumen to narrow and produce respiratory obstruction. Bronchospasm is usually treated with….read more

Bar Codes, QR Codes and More: The Intersection of Life and Technology

By: Jason Penn

The business cards I ordered arrived yesterday.  I tore into the package to do the usual inspection.  Is my name spelled correctly?  Is the card stock heavy enough?  Did they use the desired typeface?  Yes. Yes. And Yes.  But I needed to ask one additional question: Does the QR code link correctly?   I know what you are thinking:  What is a QR Code and why is it on your business card?  Let’s try an experiment. Read more…

Don’t forget, however – you can learn about Jason but just using your QR Code reader right now….

Sneak Peak of the Week Ahead

That was it for last week. What’s coming in the week ahead? Here you go -

  • Mike Sanders has a piece about our wonderful canine friends and how they are being used for those with special needs.
  • Sarah Keogh will be investigate the role and responsibility of our schools to warn parents about potential health problems involving their children
  • Jon Stefanuca will be taking a look at ovarian cancer and suggesting some key issues to discuss with your physician
  • Jason Penn will be telling us more about stroke and a very interesting problem that his research has revealed
  • I will be writing about a brand new project we are starting to take our social networking to a whole new level – stay tuned.

Again – many thanks to all who stopped by. Take a few minutes, read our posts and maybe have some interesting topics for discussion this weekend after reading last week’s Eye Opener.

Have a great weekend, Everyone!



Week in Review (April 23 – 29, 2011): The Eye Opener Health and Law Blog

Saturday, April 30th, 2011

From the Editor:

Last week was a busy but productive week for our firm’s blawgers – 6 posts – and we actually practiced law a lot! My personal thanks to our writers for taking the time to post some important pieces on health, safety, medicine and law. To our readers, my continued and sincere thanks as well. While it’s great to pull-out our soapbox and write about stuff we do and are passionate about, it’s incredibly rewarding to have you, our readers, take the time to read what we write. To those who left comments, a special thanks. We really enjoy interacting with you!

Now on to the business at hand. What did we write about that you may find interesting? Here you go.

My Pet Peeves About the New Age Mediation Process

Having been inspired by a fellow blawger from New York, Scott Greenfield, who chided legal bloggers (thus the name “blawgers”) for simply rehashing news and not taking a stand on issues, I wrote a piece called Mediation of Lawsuits: The 5 Top Things that Tick Me Off!

Having recently been through a number of mediations that were enough to pull your hair out because of the silliness that people engage in when they claim they are mediating to get cases resolved, I decided that it was time to take a stand and post a personal rant. While perhaps best understood by lawyers, claims adjusters and mediators, this blawg was not intended just for them. I’ve seen what impact foolish approaches and conduct by the participants to mediation can have on my clients, the injured parties. It was time to sound-off; so that’s what I did. I once again invite anyone who has been a party to a lawsuit mediation to do your own personal sound-off and tell us what it was like for you. It’s your turn to tell us just how much you enjoyed the process and what can be done to make it better. Read the horror story told in our Comments section by one of our Canada readers when she went through a domestic mediation process. Share your thoughts and stories as well.

Health Care: Who’s “Voiceless” When It Comes to Being Heard on Capitol Hill

Guess I had too much time on my hands at the beginning of this week (not really!). I couldn’t help but be inspired by a piece Jason Penn had done last week about how families were so adversely affected by the budget cuts that were made when the government shutdown was looming a few weeks ago. As I was going through my Google Reader early this past week, I came across an Op Ed by a doctor, who was complaining or at least suggesting that the president and congress need to hear more what doctors had to say about health care reform. Having read that, Jason’s piece jumped into my mind and the result was my blawg entitled Health Reform: What voice does the patient have in the debate.

The post brings to light the amount of money being spent by the healthcare industry in its lobbying efforts on health care reform. ObamaCare‘s raison d’etre is explored as well since it is ironic, if not sad, how the story behind all this money, lobbying and legislation seems to have been lost in the rhetoric. More affordable, better and available health care for our citizens? Then why were the most needy among us the victims of back room wheeling and dealing when the time came for budget cuts to save the federal government from closing its doors? I ask the question – who’s voice is being heard – but more important – who’s is not?

FDA approves use of “meningitis drug,” Menactra, for younger children

Hopefully you’ll never need to use this information, but if you do, Jason Penn reported on a condition – meningitis – that can affect not only adults and older children, but infants and toddlers as well. Meningitis is generally defined as an inflammation of the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord. Prior to a recent change in position by the FDA, there wasn’t a vaccine available for children under the age of 2. Now, with the FDA’s recent approval, Menactra can be used to vaccinate children from the age of 9 months to age 2.

In addition to this news release, Jason tells parents about the signs and symptoms they should be aware of to spot this condition.

The classic symptoms of meningitis are a high fever, headache and stiff neck. Detection of these symptoms, particularly headache and stiff neck are certainly difficult to detect in infants and toddlers. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, infants with meningitis may appear slow or inactive, have vomiting, be irritable, or be feeding poorly. Seizures are also a possibility.

To learn more about this important topic, read his piece Meningitis & Your Baby: Three Things to Think About.

Why are children still dying because of venetian blinds?

Sarah Keogh wrote what I believe is a very important piece for parents, grandparents or anyone who has a baby in the house. Years ago we all heard about the horror of parents finding their babies dead from strangulation when their necks became entangled in venetian blinds. Years have passed since those stories made the front page. Well, an update on just how well manufacturers and parents have been doing to avoid such tragedies was recently posted in The New York Times.

In her blawg entitled Window Blinds: Why are Children Still Dying, Sarah tells us the sad truth that these deaths and injuries still continue in our country. Find out what you as a caregiver of a young child need to realize about this product. Maybe you’ve put the cords up high and out-of-reach for your baby. Maybe you’ve taken other steps to avoid such a nightmarish event ever happening in your home and in your life. Unfortunately, many who have done so have still suffered this tragedy. Why? What is being done by manufacturers and the government to prevent these injuries and deaths ? Read Sarah’s piece for the answers and some practical advice you can take to make your home safer for your child.

Hospitals Reporting Methods for “Adverse Events”

We all know by now that if you want to look good to the public, all you have to do is “play with the numbers.” Well, it seems like hospitals have a penchant for doing just that. One of the key “numbers” that advocates of patient health and safety look at is how many “adverse events” take place in any given hospital. An “adverse event,” as you may already know, is – simply put – any harm to a patient as a result of medical care.

In his post this past week, Jason Penn compares some interesting adverse event bookkeeping by hospitals throughout our country. His blawg, The New Enron? Are Hospitals Cooking the Books?, brings to light serious flaws in the way that our medical institutions “count” the number of so-called adverse events taking place within their walls. His research for this piece reveals…

[M]edical errors occur 10 times more than previously thought.Maybe that wasn’t hard hitting enough. Let me try again. How about this: mistakes occur in one out of every three hospital admissions!

Frankly, that strikes me as an astounding and very concerning number. Are the numbers being reported reflecting this? The simple answer is no. Why not? Read Jason’s post and see what reporting systems are in place – or not in place as the case may be. We all remember Enron. Is this the medical version of “making the numbers look good” when they simply are not!

Surgeons and Booze – an Obvious Bad Combination – Who’s Protecting Us?

It doesn’t take a genius to realize that surgeons should not be under the influence when we as patients are “under the knife” What’s not so obvious is just how prevalent this may be in the operating rooms of our country (and throughout the world).

Wondering what the studies have been done by the medical profession to examine this problem? Have any idea what regulations are in place by hospitals to guard against the problem of “hungover surgeons”?

Wonder no more. Jon Stefanuca’s blog this past week, Hungover Surgeons: Watch Out! There’s Nothing Between You and Their Scalpel!,will tell you all you need to know. Jon queries: “Should hospitals regulate for patient safety?” What do you think? Share your comments.

A “Sneak Peak” of the week ahead

Some more good advice is on the way for parents of special needs children. We all know about what a wonderful aide dogs are for the blind. Mike Sanders will share what he’s learned how these canine wonders are being used for kids in need. Suffering from asthma or know someone who is? Jon Stefanuca will be sharing with  you some valuable information on this topic next week. A number of our clients or their now-deceased family members have suffered from this condition. Jon will share a story or two (without revealing protected confidential information) to bring to light just how this medical condition needs to be better recognized and treated by our health care providers before its too late. We all know what a difficult job nursing can be. That being said, Sarah Keogh will be telling us about some very concerning “trends” that are coming to light in this wonderful profession. Stay tuned for this important piece.

We’ll start next week off with a new blawg by our in-house medical specialist, Theresa Neumann. Her post on how important it can be to get a second opinion before you sign-up for a surgery, procedure or test is sitting in the queue just waiting to hit the pages of The Eye Opener – Views and Opinions from the Nash Community.

One Final Note: I wrote in last weekend’s Week In Review that we intended to post a new White Paper by Marian Hogan on a very important topic relating to Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA). It didn’t happen – because of “my Bad.” I fouled-up and sent the wrong draft of Marian’ s piece to our graphic designer. He did a wonderful job – as usual – of getting it ready – it just wasn’t the right version. The problem is fixed, but my mistake will delay the posting of this important White Paper for another week. Public apology: Sorry, Marian! We’ll make it right soon.


Week in Review (April 18 – 22, 2011) The Eye Opener Health and Law Blog

Saturday, April 23rd, 2011

From the Editor:

This past week, our blawgers (guess I’ll use this term now since we are legal bloggers) were busy on their keyboards once again. They covered a number of topics relating to law, medicine, health and patient safety. This week we posted a primer on aortic aneurysms and how they can present as back pain, a blog about “robot” anesthesiology, a disturbing post about how the recent threat of a federal government shutdown was averted but at a cost to those who are in dire need of healthcare, an interesting piece about laughing gas making its way back into the American medical scene for labor and delivery and finally, and a highly read piece on a not-to-often discussed topic but one of potential grave concern – shift switching by nurses and how this might impact patient safety.

Here’s our usual “quick summaries” for you to peruse, click on, read and comment:

Aneurysms – a deadly condition you need to know about!

Our in-house medical specialist, Theresa Neumann, wrote another highly educational and need-to-know piece about a condition that can present as back pain but which has deadly consequences for those who have this condition.

As Theresa’s research made us aware – “1 in every 50 males over the age of 55 have an abdominal aneurysm, this is a more common pathologic diagnosis than some others.  Men also corner the market at an 8-to-1 ratio as compared to women with abdominal aneurysms.”

As is the case with all of Theresa’s writings, we offer through her valuable information from someone who’s “been there” and “done that” in the clinical setting. Don’t miss her post entitled Aneurysms: A Potential Deadly Condition That May Present as Back Pain.

Who’s using remote control and a joy stick to put a breathing tube down your throat?

Mike Sanders brought to our attention a new practice of anesthesiologists – in Canada – that may soon be part of anesthesia management in the United States as well – using robotics to intubate patients. While you can certainly learn about the concept of intubation by reading Mike’s blog, basically, this is placing a small tube down a patient’s airway so that the anesthesiologist can control the airway and provide ventilation to a patient undergoing surgery.

Here’s an except -

Medical News Today is reporting that Dr. Thomas Hemmerling of McGill University and his team have developed a robotic system for intubation that can be operated via remote control.

For more on this fascinating new project by Dr. Hammerling and his team, read Mike’s post entitled Robot Anesthesiologists?

Government Shutdown Avoided – but who will pay the price for the “deals” that were cut?

The newest member of our blogging team, Jason Penn (fast approaching veteran blawger status) did a fascinating piece of the story-behind-the-story of the recent crisis our country faced when the federal government was on the verge of a shutdown. We all know about deals being cut in the back rooms of congress. We all know that the government avoided a shutdown this time around when the senate and house worked out a compromise that resulted in millions of dollars being earmarked for cuts in the budget.

Jason tells us what programs relating to healthcare will suffer as a result of these negotiated cuts. As some wise person once said, “why is it always those who are least represented who bear the burden of budget cuts?” Maybe it’s because they can’t afford lobbyists to protect them like those who need protection the least can.

Read Jason’s eye opening and no-punches-pulled report on just who will be the victims of the deals in his post of this past week Budget Crisis Avoided, But What About the Babies? Can They Live With $504 Million Less in Funding?

Will moms-to-be now be “laughing” their way through labor and delivery?

One of our seasoned blawgers, who every now and then is driven to report on the off-beat issues of law, medicine and healthcare, Jon Stefanuca, stepped up to the plate once again and took a swing at the return of an old-timer to the arsenal of pain relief for mothers-to-be undergoing labor and delivery – laughing gas!

As Jon’s piece in Eye Opener this past week tells us -

It appears that a number of hospitals are now considering making laughing gas available as a pain relief measure for women in labor. A hospital in San Francisco and another in Seattle have been using laughing gas in their labor and delivery units for a while. Hospitals like Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center plan to offer laughing gas to laboring mothers in the immediate future.

For more about this return of laughing gas to our obstetrical units, read Jon’s piece Laughing Gas Making Its Way Back Into the Labor and Delivery Department.

Nursing and Sleep Deprivation: Is it a risk factor for patient safety?

I suspect somewhere along the line you have done “an all-nighter” – whether it was getting ready for a big test, a social event, or for some other reason. Remember how you felt as you made it through that night or the next day? Have you ever done it several nights in the same week? How about doing it a few times one week and then do the same thing the next week and the next…. Well you no doubt get the idea. You’ve been exhausted, right? Well what about nurses, who have to do this for a living?

Nurses have lives too. They have children, home responsibilities and obligations, and some form of social life. What happens when they swap shifts or are asked to do “a double”?

Sarah Keogh was back blogging this past week and wrote a fascinating (and concerning) post entitled Nurses Switching Shifts: Does a Lack of Sleep Put Patients at Risk? We invite you to read Sarah’s piece and share your comments. Are you a nurse who lives this lifestyle? What are your thoughts about nurses being allowed to work multiple shifts or back-to-back shifts in terms of patient safety? Should there be restrictions on nurses’ shifts just as there (finally) are work restrictions on doctors-in-training?

A “Sneak Peak” of the week ahead

As part of our continuing effort to “get the word out there” on issues relating to health, medicine, patient safety and the law, we post from time to time more extensive research pieces called White Papers. Well, the time has arrived for another White Paper to be posted on our website. Marian Hogan has completed her piece on a very important topic – Patient Controlled Analgesia in today’s hospital environment. She examines how some hospitals are now heavily marketing a spa-like environment so you choose them over the competition. Yet lurking in the shadows of these facilities which promote flat screen TV’s, valet parking, in-room safes and the like is a very dangerous practice: placing patients on patient-controlled-analgesia (for pain relief) without vital monitoring devices and patient safety practices. It’s at the “printer” now; we hope to have it online this week.

From our blawgers you can expect reports on a disturbing fight between manufacturers and child safety experts over – blinds! After decades of controversy, you’ll find out where the battle lines are now drawn, who’s winning and who the real losers are in this war. Wonder how healthcare safety is doing since the report To Err is Human was published by the Institute of Medicine over a decade ago? Jason Penn will be providing an updated report card, which you should not miss. Alcohol and surgery – not a good combination! Jon Stefanuca plans on posting a piece that looks deeper in the obvious problems with this potentially deadly combination.

This is just a taste of what’s to come. I better wrap-up now. I’m working on finishing the third installment on Medical Technology and Patient Safety. Oh yeah, if time permits, I might even get to post a piece I’ve been working on this past week – a lawyer’s rant about our modern day love affair with mediation practices and trends.

As always, don’t forget - subscribe to the Eye Opener and tell your friends about us too! …and… don’t forget to join our social networking communities on Facebook and Twitter.

Hope you have a great weekend!

Week in Review: Miss our posts this past week? Catch-up now!

Saturday, April 16th, 2011

From Eye Opener’s Editor, Brian Nash: Another week gone by – where does the time go? Our bloggers this past week, Theresa Neumann, Jon Stefanuca, Jason Penn, Mike Sanders and Sarah Keogh, were – in addition to practicing law – busy on the keyboard blogging away. In case you missed any posts during the week of April 10th through the 15th, here’s your opportunity to catch-up.

The “Medical Home” – find out what it is and why you should have one!

This past week, Sarah wrote two blogs on a concept that frankly I had not heard of before – the Medical Home. Her follow-up piece on how parents in particular are using emergency departments and clinics was posted yesterday, Friday, April 15th.

In her first piece, Sarah discussed a key issue about continuity of medical care for all of us but particularly our children. While there’s no doubt that there are times when taking your child to an emergency room is the only way to go in a true emergency, is it really the right place for a child to receive primary care? You see a physician or a medical specialist such as a physician’s assistant on a one-time basis. What do they really know about your child’s complete medical history? Do they really address key issues of general health care that is essential to your child’s overall health?

Her second post addresses specifically the topic of how many in this country are using facilities such as in-store clinics and emergency rooms for minor, non-emergency care. While there is no doubt that ED’s and clinics serve a vital role in the providing of healthcare in the United States, are they being used the right way? Are clinics often the only place where many in our country can obtain care for their children? Read Sarah’s posts on What is a medical home? Do your children have one? and her follow-up piece Clinics and Emergency Rooms: Helpful or Barriers to Good Pediatric Care.

A Disturbing Report on Some Area Hospitals and their Complication Rates

Earlier in the week, the new member of our legal team, Jason Penn, wrote about a recent report from the Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission regarding a continuing failure of several local Maryland and DC hospitals to lessen the number of patients who suffer from complications while in these institutions. P.G. Hospital Center won the dubious distinction of being first in class. Jason reports that this institution, which services many of the area’s population, was fined by the state of Maryland for the number of “complications that are unlikely to be a consequence of the natural progression of an underlying disease.” The “list” includes specified complications such as “bed sores, infections, accidental punctures or cuts during medical procedures, strokes, falls, delivery with placental complications, obstetrical hemorrhage without transfusion, septicemia, collapsed lungs and kidney failure.” For information as to how the local jurisdictions deal with these hospitals in the pocketbook and who made the list, read Jason’s blog post entitled Report Card on Failing Hospitals: Prince George’s Hospital Center Tops “Complications” List.

Learn More about Medicine and Your Health

Theresa Neumann, an in-house medical specialist in our firm, posted Spinal Stroke: An atypical cause of back pain this past week. It’s one thing to have lawyers who live and breath medicine and the law write about medical conditions; it’s quite another to have real medical specialists like Theresa educate all of us on medical matters that affect the lives of so many. Theresa brings to the public’s awareness the signs, symptoms, risks and potential treatment alternatives to a catastrophically disabling condition that many just don’t know about – until it’s too late for them.

We’ve all – unfortunately – heard about or know someone who has suffered a stroke in their brain. Well, as Theresa reports, there’s an equally devastating form of stroke that can hit our spinal cord, which can render the victim paralyzed, without control of bowel or bladder, incapable of feeling sensation and a host of other life-altering consequences. We’re always appreciative of the wonderful, educational pieces Theresa brings to our blog. This piece is no exception.

The War against Super Bugs – MRSA and CRKP – are we losing the fight?

There was a time many months ago where we all became aware of the super bug infection known as MRSA. It was in the news over and over again. Have you heard much about it lately? Silence by news media might make one think that our medical institutions have won the war and the threat of this deadly infection is over. As Mike Sanders tells us – not so quick! In his blog of this past week, Deadly Super Bugs on the rise, Mike tells us who’s winning the MRSA war to and about a newcomer in the Super Bug family – CRKP.

The news is simply not good! See what seems to be working against MRSA and don’t miss the update at the end of Mike’s post about a new prevention method using honey.

Law and Medicine

Well we are lawyers – so why not a piece about our specialty area – representing patients and families of patients against healthcare providers? This past week, Jon Stefanuca wrote what we consider to be a very important piece entitled Should you sue a healthcare provider? Some guidelines to help you decide.

Some may just be surprised about the advice Jon gives in this posting. It is not a call to arms against the medical profession or even a call to our law firm so you can sue the b*****ds! Jon offers some very important advice to those who have been through an experience with a healthcare provider and are considering whether or not they have a potential lawsuit for the injuries they have suffered.

We believe this post encapsulates in large part some principles we have been advocating for a long time. Not every bad outcome means malpractice has occurred. However, how would you – as a lay person – be able to make the distinction between what is and what is not a real medical malpractice case? In addition to Jon’s sage advice, this post links to a White Paper we did on Choosing a Lawyer – a Primer. We hope if you have unfortunately found yourself faced with this issue of whether you should sue or not that you will find this blog by Jon informative and helpful in making your decision.

A Sneak Peak of the Week Ahead

As you can see, our bloggers were quite busy last week. Well, this coming week will be no different. The days ahead will be consumed with representing our clients in depositions, investigations, filing pleadings and court appearances….and writing and posting some interesting, important blogs on aneurysms (did you know they can present as back pain?), laughing gas coming back for moms in labor, sleep deprivation for nurses (and how well that plays out in your healthcare) and some other good stuff our writers are busy working on this weekend and during the week ahead.

Stay tuned – stay informed! Read the Eye Opener and tell your friends about us too! …and don’t forget to join our social networking communities on Facebook and Twitter.

Week in Review: If you missed this past week’s blogs – catch up!

Sunday, April 10th, 2011

This past week was a busy one for our bloggers. It was also a very busy week in our law practice. Over the last two months, we have also had two new lawyers join us – Sarah Keogh and Jason Penn. Sarah has contributed a number of posts already. Jason , who just started this past Monday, will soon be sharing his contributions, thoughts and comments with you as well. We’re very happy to have both of them. I’m sure you join us in wishing them a very warm welcome.

Last week our writers covered a number of topics related to health, medicine, child safety, medical technology and patient safety. We started the week off with a piece by Brian Nash on some key facts women need to be aware of when having an epidural for labor, delivery and post-partum pain relief.

Epidurals

There can be no doubt that thousands of epidurals are administered to women every day throughout this country. This form of analgesia (pain relief) has become probably the most popular form of anesthetic management and apparently is generally believed to be essentially risk free. As this week’s piece, Having an epidural when you have your baby? 3 questions to ask the doctor, reports, some literature gives the figure of complications from epidurals as high as 23% - ranging in severity from minor inconveniences, to life-long major disabilities and even death.

This particular piece was written as a result of several cases in which we have been involved when women, who had undergone an epidural, became essentially paralyzed from the waist down. We raise some questions for women to ask the doctor and suggest they just might want to ask those questions before they find themselves in the process of labor or when they are going through the recovery phase of having given birth to their baby. We believe it’s an important piece for women – and frankly for all – to read so that they have a much better idea of what they should expect with an epidural and what the risks and benefits are of this wonderful yet potentially life-altering anesthetic technique.

Shaken-Baby-Syndrome

On Wednesday, Jon Stefanuca again brought to the public’s attention a problem that is probably as old as childbirth. Everyone who has had the experience of taking care of a child – particularly a baby – knows that along with the joy of parenting comes the physical and emotional toll on parents and care-givers. The human condition makes us all susceptible to being less than completely tolerant, forgiving and gentle with little ones when we are under stress, frustrated or just plain exhausted. The response to the persistent crying can simply not be “a good shake.”

Medicine and science (and unfortunately the courtroom) have given a name to a syndrome of injury babies can suffer when that “just a good shake” approach is used. While a parent or care-giver may think it unimaginable to strike a child, they may not realize just now much harm they can do with “just a good shake.” Jon brings this information and some expert tips and tricks on how to deal with these difficult times parents and care-givers face in their everyday lives in his piece Shaken Baby Syndrome – What we all should know to prevent child abuse.

Makena: New Anti-Prematurity Drug

Thursday, Sarah Keogh reported on a relatively new drug called Makena, which has been found to help pregnant women, who have previously had a premature infant. I say “relatively” since according to Sarah’s piece, a compounding pharmacy could and was making this medication prior to the FDA giving K-V Pharmaceutical Company the exclusive rights to manufacture this drug for a period of 7 years.

Read Sarah’s piece, Makena: Drug to fight prematurity leads to major firestorm, and see what the controversy is all about. How could people possible be upset with a drug that can fight premature birth? Prematurity is one of the major causes of significant childbirth injuries such as cerebral palsy. Sarah’s blog makes it all too clear why people are upset and why the March of Dimes withdrew its sponsorship for Makena.

Medical Technology and Patient Safety

The week ended with Part II of my series on medical technology and whether all the new toys, bells and whistles of our modern healthcare system are truly advancing safe, efficient and effective delivery of healthcare. The week’s piece focuses on perhaps one of the largest advances in the healthcare industry – electronic medical records (EMR).

The blog, Medical Technology and Patient Safety – Part II – EMR’s (electronic medical records), brings a lawyer’s perspective to this topic. Much has already been written – and frankly will continue to be written – about EMR’s by the medical profession. Controversy has filed the pages of journals and at times probably slowed traffic on the internet (okay – maybe that’s a bit of an exaggeration) since this new marvelous technological advance was rolled-out in our medical institutions.  Those writing and fighting about it have been the end-users themselves – the medical professionals, who have to deal with the issues and flaws that have surfaced with this wonderful new technology. I thought it was about time to tell you how this plays out by another end-user – the lawyer who now deals with EMR’s. This piece is also intended as the foundation for what we as lawyer have seen play-out in terms of patient safety and health as a result of EMR implementation.

Sneak Peak of the Week Ahead

I anticipate that next week we’ll be seeing Jason Penn with his first blog on a recent report about numerous safety violations by hospitals in our practice jurisdictions – Maryland and Washington, D.C. Mike Sanders will be bringing to our readers aN old but back-in-the-news report on super infections, which still seem to be – unfortunately – thriving in our nation’s hospitals. We’ll start off this coming week with a piece by Theresa Neumann, our highly acclaimed in-house physician’s assistant expert, on spinal stroke. We all know about strokes that can damage the brain. Theresa will be sharing her insights on an equally devastating stroke of the spinal cord. I also suspect – shhh – that we’ll be reading more from Sarah Keogh this coming week. If the practice of law doesn’t get too much in the way, I am also hoping to share with you some real life examples – from a lawyer’s perspective – of just how EMR’s may not be advancing the causes of patient safety and health.

As with all our blogs, we sincerely invite you to not only read our thoughts and comments but to also share yours with us and our readers. Our latest stats show that around 10,000 pages are viewed by our readers and visitors every month! We sincerely thank all of you, who have taken the time out of your busy lives to read our offerings in The Eye Opener – Views and Opinions from the Nash Community. We invite you to share our posts with your friends and colleagues. Don’t forget to sign-up for easy delivery to your email inbox. Last – but certainly not least – come join our social media communities on Facebook and Twitter.